Foreign travel advice

Russia

Entry requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Visas

To enter Russia you’ll need a visa before travel. Make sure you apply for the correct type and duration of visa and that you abide by the conditions of your visa. During periods of high demand, you should apply for your visa well in advance. For example, tourist visa applications normally take 10 working days to be processed, but this will be longer during busy periods.

All applicants over the age of 12 will need to visit a visa application centre to submit biometric data (scanned fingerprints). For further information see the Russian embassy website and the website of VFS Global who manage Russian visa applications.

On receiving your visa you should check the details carefully including the validity dates and passport number to make sure they are correct. You should make sure you’re aware of the terms and conditions attached to your visa, for both entry and exit, before you travel. You should adhere to the validity and conditions of your visa.

If you intend to stay longer, you should arrange an extension of your visa before it expires.

Overstaying your visa without authorisation from the Russian migration authorities can result in a delay to your departure from Russia, as well as possible, fines, court hearings, deportation and a ban from re-entry.

According to Russian law, cruise or ferry passengers can stay in Russia for 72 hours without visas if they have booked tours through the companies officially licensed by the Russian government. These companies will supply you with a tour ticket, which is called a blanket visa or booking confirmation. This will let you pass the customs/immigration offices without any other documents except your valid passport and the migration card that you will be given onboard.

This visa-free exception applies only to those who join an organised tour while onshore. Cruise passengers are free to use any authorised local travel agencies (not only cruise ship tour companies) for visa-free shore tours.

Cities where this applies are:

  • St Petersburg
  • Kaliningrad
  • Vladivostok
  • Sochi
  • Vyborg
  • Korsakov (Sakhalin Island)
  • Novorossiysk

If your passport has been lost/stolen while ashore and a replacement Emergency Travel Document is issued, or you plan to continue your journey by air or land, you must get a visa to leave Russia.

The Russian government has announced plans to introduce biometric fingerprinting for all foreign nationals, including British nationals, entering Russia. No dates have been confirmed.

Registration

If you’re staying for more than 7 working days you must register with the local branch of the Main Department for Migration Issues of the Ministry of Interior. Most major hotels will do this automatically. If you’re staying in private accommodation the owner of the property must do this for you.

Passport validity 

Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of 6 months after the expiry date of your visa.

If you’re travelling on a British passport issued since January 2017, you should make sure you’ve signed your passport before you travel. Some British nationals who haven’t signed their new passports have been denied entry into Russia.

Travelling between Russia and Belarus

By air: British nationals flying to Russia from Belarus or to Belarus from Russia are subject to immigration control. If you’re transiting Russia when flying to/from Belarus, please contact the nearest Russian embassy or consulate to check if a transit visa is needed.

By road: There are no legal grounds for foreigners (including British nationals) to cross the land border between Russia and Belarus. If you’re planning on entering Russia by road, you’ll need to take an alternative route through a different country.

By rail: If you’re planning on travelling by rail between the two countries, you should contact your train or tour operator when you make your booking to seek their advice. You should also consider contacting your nearest Russian embassy or consulate for advice on the latest situation for rail travellers.

You should make sure you have all the necessary visas for the duration of your travel.

Access to restricted areas

Access to certain sensitive areas within Russia such as military and border zones are restricted. You must get permission from the local authorities before entering these areas. You can find a list on this website (in Russian).

If you don’t get the necessary permissions you may be arrested, fined, or even deported. If you’re in any doubt about whether a tour or excursion will take you into a restricted area, contact your tour operator or the Russian Embassy in London.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) are accepted for entry, landside transit and exit from Russia only if they contain a valid Russian visa. The Russian authorities will only put a visa for Russia in an ETD in limited circumstances. Contact the nearest Russian embassy or consulate outside Russia or local migration office in Russia to find out if a visa can be issued. You also need to check with the Russian embassy, consulate or migration office on the required length of ETD validity.

UK ETDs without a visa are accepted for airside transit only. You should check with your travel company or airline that transit zones will be available at the airports of your planned route.

Migration cards

On entering Russia you must sign a migration card, which is produced electronically at passport control in the major airports. Some airports may still require you to complete the migration card manually. You must complete a new migration card each time you enter Russia, even if you have a multiple entry visa.

The card is in two identical parts. One part will be retained by the Immigration Officer on arrival. You should keep the other part with your passport. You will need it when you leave Russia as well as if you’re stopped by the police for an ID check during your stay. There are many hotels and hostels that will not check in guests if they don’t have the immigration card with them. If you lose the second part of the card you’ll be fined and your departure from the country could be delayed. 

Dual nationality

Under international law, the British embassy can’t formally intervene with the Russian authorities on behalf of dual Russian/British nationals.

Under Russian law, Russian passport holders must inform the Russian authorities of any other passports they hold. If you hold both British and Russian citizenship you should take legal advice and/ or contact the relevant Russian authority (the nearest Russian embassy or consulate if you’re not in Russia or your local migration office if you’re in Russia) to find out how this affects you. See the Main Department for Migration Issues of the Russian Ministry of Interior (in Russian only) for more details.

Children born overseas and added to their parents’ Russian passports may now have to get their own passport to exit Russia. Check with the Russian Embassy or Consulate before travel to ensure you have the necessary paperwork.

If you come to Russia to renew your Russian international passport, it may take up to 4 months for a new passport to be issued. You won’t be able to leave Russia on your British passport if you entered Russia on your Russian passport, and will therefore have to remain in Russia until your new Russian passport is issued.

Customs

You can import up to 10,000 US dollars (or equivalent) into the country and export foreign currency up to the equivalent of 10,000 US dollars from Russia without declaring it.

If you import over 10,000 US dollars or certain categories of goods like electrical items, jewellery, antiques and valuable musical instruments, you must complete a customs declaration form.

If you wish to import certain advanced electronic items (e.g. Global Positioning System instruments), you must get an operating licence from the Russian authorities before you travel. Check with the embassy or consulate before your departure.

If you complete a declaration make sure the form is stamped by a Customs official at your port of entry, otherwise your foreign currency and non-declared items may be confiscated when you leave Russia and you may be fined.

There are strict regulations governing the export from Russia of antiques, icons, medals, artwork and other items of historical significance. This includes modern art and even posters if they are particularly rare or valuable. You must get approval from the Ministry of Culture.

For further information visit the website of the Russian Federal Customs Service.