Guidance

Coronavirus: MOTs due up to 29 March 2020

What to do if your car, van or motorcycle’s MOT expiry date was on or before 29 March 2020.

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This page tells you what to do if your vehicle’s MOT expired on or before 29 March 2020.

It will be updated if anything changes.

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If your vehicle’s MOT expired on or before 29 March 2020, you must book an MOT as usual unless either:

  • you or someone you live with has coronavirus symptoms
  • you’re extremely vulnerable from coronavirus

You must stay at home (self-isolate) if either of these situations apply - do not take your vehicle for its MOT.

There are different rules if your MOT expiry date is on or after 30 March 2020. The rules are different because the law changed on 30 March. The new rules could not apply to MOTs due before the law changed.

You or someone you live with has symptoms of coronavirus

You must not take your vehicle for its MOT if you or someone you live with has coronavirus symptoms.

You have to stay at home if you or someone you live with has coronavirus symptoms. This is called ‘self-isolation’.

The Department for Transport (DfT) is working with insurers and the police to make sure you are not unfairly penalised for not being able to get an MOT.

If your vehicle tax is due to run out before you can get an MOT

Register your vehicle as off the road (SORN) if all of these apply:

  • your MOT has expired
  • your vehicle tax is due to run out
  • you cannot get your vehicle tested because you’re self-isolating

You need to do this because you need a valid MOT (unless your vehicle is exempt) to renew your vehicle tax.

When you no longer need to self-isolate

You must not drive your vehicle before you take it to its MOT.

  1. Book your MOT test at an open centre. MOT centres and garages are still allowed to stay open.

  2. Tax your vehicle when it has passed its MOT. Only do this if you had to register it as off the road.

The MOT centre will not give you a paper copy of your MOT certificate. This is to help prevent the spread of coronavirus. You can download a copy when you check your vehicle’s MOT history after the test.

You are extremely vulnerable from coronavirus

You must not take your vehicle for its MOT if you’re extremely vulnerable from coronavirus.

You should stay at home at all times and avoid any face-to-face contact if you’re extremely vulnerable from coronavirus. This is called ‘shielding’.

DfT is working with insurers and the police to make sure you are not unfairly penalised for not being able to get an MOT.

If your vehicle tax is due to run out while you’re being shielded

Register your vehicle as off the road (SORN) if all of these apply:

  • your MOT has expired
  • your vehicle tax is due to run out
  • you cannot get your vehicle tested because you’re being shielded

You need to do this because you need a valid MOT (unless your vehicle is exempt) to renew your vehicle tax.

When you no longer need to be shielded

You must not drive your vehicle before you take it to its MOT.

  1. Book your MOT test.

  2. Tax your vehicle when it has passed its MOT. Only do this if you had to register it as off the road.

You’re not self-isolating or extremely vulnerable

Book your MOT test if you’re not self-isolating or extremely vulnerable from coronavirus.

MOT centres and garages are allowed to stay open for you to do this. You can use any open MOT centre.

You should only get your vehicle’s MOT done if you need to use it:

  • to shop for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • for any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid or escape risk of injury or harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • to travel for work purposes (but only where you cannot work from home)

The MOT centre will not give you a paper copy of your MOT certificate. This is to help prevent the spread of coronavirus. You can download a copy when you check your vehicle’s MOT history after the test.

Driving if your MOT or vehicle tax has run out

You must not drive your vehicle on the road if the MOT or vehicle tax has run out. You can be prosecuted if caught.

The only exceptions are if you are driving it:

  • to or from somewhere to be repaired
  • to a pre-arranged MOT test
Published 25 March 2020