Research and analysis

Aspects of school workforce remodelling: strategies used and impact on workload and standards

Research looking at the different strategies used by schools to implement the specific aspects of the national agreement.

Documents

Aspects of school workforce remodelling: strategies used and impact on workload and standards

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Aspects of school workforce remodelling: strategies used and impact on workload and standards - summary

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Detail

The national agreement, Raising Standards and Tackling Workload (2003), signed by the then DfES and its social partners in January 2003, had two aims: to raise standards and reduce teacher workload. It outlined a series of changes to teachers’ contracts, which have subsequently been incorporated into the School Teachers Pay and Conditions Document (STPCD).

This research report explores the different strategies used by schools to implement the specific aspects of the National Agreement (Raising Standards and Tackling Workload) and the impact of these changes on standards and workload.

A national survey was undertaken of headteachers, teachers and support staff in primary, secondary and special schools. Qualitative case studies were carried out in 19 schools selected from the survey responses to illustrate a variety of practice. In each case study, the headteacher, teachers, support staff who took responsibility for whole classes and administrative support staff were interviewed.

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