Entry requirements

This page has information on travelling to Italy. Check what you must do to return to the UK.

This page reflects the UK government’s understanding of current rules for people travelling on a full ‘British Citizen’ passport from the UK, for the most common types of travel.

The authorities in Italy set and enforce entry rules.

All travellers

From 1 May travellers will no longer be required to complete a passenger locator form (EU PLF) to enter or travel through Italy as a visitor.

As of 1 June, COVID-19 restrictions on entering Italy have been lifted. Italy does not require any proof of vaccination, a negative test result, or a COVID-19 recovery certificate to enter the country, regardless of your vaccination status.

All passengers entering Italy by ferry, train or coach must wear an FFP2 mask in order to enter the country. Masks are no longer required on flights in, to or from Italy.

Further information on entry requirements from the UK and other countries can be found on the Ministry of Health website and the Italian Government’s online questionnaire.

If you’re fully vaccinated

Entry requirements for Italy are the same for all travellers, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status.

Proof of vaccination status

You don’t need to provide your vaccination status for entry to Italy.

If you’re not fully vaccinated

Entry requirements for Italy are the same for all travellers, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status.

If you’ve had COVID-19 in the past year

Entry requirements for Italy are the same for all travellers, regardless of whether you have tested positive for COVID-19 in the past year.

Children and young people

There are no specific requirements for children and young people.

If you’re transiting through Italy

Transiting is when you pass through one country on the way to your final destination. Italy’s land borders are open. You should check travel advice for any countries you plan to travel through ahead of your journey and should ensure that you have the necessary tests for each country you transit as well as Italy.

Transiting Italy by Air

Check with your airline before departing.

Passengers who remain within the airport transit area are not required to complete a Passenger Locator Form for transit through Italy and should follow the rules of the country of your final destination.

If the airport does not have transit facilities or you have booked connecting flights with different airlines, you will need to pass through Immigration. You may be asked to show proof of onward travel or proof of accommodation and funds if you intend to break your journey in Italy. You may need to complete a Passenger Locator Form from Italy to the country of your final destination.

Transiting Italy by Land or Sea

You should follow the rules of the country of your final destination, including whether you need to complete a Passenger Locator Form.

Consult the Italian Government’s online questionnaire (in English) for more advice and the Re-open Europe website for transit regulations.

Exemptions

Full information and instructions on exemptions can be found on the Ministry of Health website and the Italian Embassy in London’s update page.

Check your passport and travel documents before you travel

You should check with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Passport validity

If you are planning to travel to an EU country (except Ireland), or Switzerland, Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Andorra, Monaco, San Marino or Vatican City, you must follow the Schengen area passport requirements.

Your passport must be:

  • issued less than 10 years before the date you enter the country (check the ‘date of issue’)
  • valid for at least 3 months after the day you plan to leave (check the ‘expiry date’)

You must check your passport meets these requirements before you travel. If your passport was issued before 1 October 2018, extra months may have been added to its expiry date.

Contact the embassy of the country you are visiting if you think that your passport does not meet both these requirements. Renew your passport if you need to.

Visas

You can travel to countries in the Schengen area for up to 90 days in any 180-day period without a visa. This applies if you travel as a tourist, to visit family or friends, to attend business meetings, cultural or sports events, or for short-term studies or training.

If you are travelling to Italy and other Schengen countries without a visa, make sure your whole visit is within the 90-day limit. Visits to Schengen countries within the previous 180 days before you travel count towards your 90 days.

To stay longer, to work or study, for business travel or for other reasons, you will need to meet the Italian government’s entry requirements. Check which type of visa and/or work permit you may need with the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before booking an appointment through the Italian consulates in London or Edinburgh.

If you are travelling to Italy for work, read the guidance on visas and permits.

If you stay in Italy with a residence permit or long-stay visa, this does not count towards your 90-day visa-free limit.

British citizens who are unable to return to the UK before the expiry of their visa/permit or the end of their visa-free limit due to COVID-19 restrictions should contact their local immigration office (questura)

Passport stamping

At Italian border control, you may need to:

  • show proof of your accommodation, for example, a hotel booking confirmation or proof of address if visiting your own property (e.g. second home)
  • show proof of insurance for your trip. Please check the guidance on travel insurance
  • show a return or onward ticket
  • you should also be able to prove that you have enough money for your stay. The minimum amount required depends on your accommodation
  • your host must inform the local immigration office (questura) in writing within 48 hours after you arrive at their property. They could be fined if they fail to comply with this Italian immigration law

Check your passport is stamped if you enter or exit the Schengen area through Italy as a visitor. Border guards will use passport stamps to check you’re complying with the 90-day visa-free limit for short stays in the Schengen area. If relevant entry or exit stamps are not in your passport, border guards will presume that you have overstayed your visa-free limit.

You can show evidence of when and where you entered or exited the Schengen area, and ask the border guards to add this date and location in your passport. Examples of acceptable evidence include boarding passes and tickets.

If you are entering from a Schengen Area country (e.g. France) you are required to declare your presence to the local immigration authority (questura) within 8 days of arriving (‘dichiarazione di presenza’). The questura will provide a form to complete. This requirement is not applicable if you are staying in a hotel or a B&B property.

Further information is provided on the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website.

If you are resident in Italy, read our Living in Italy guide for passport stamping information.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency Travel Documents (ETDs) are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Italy.

Returning to the UK

Check what you must do to return to the UK.