Immigration Rules

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Immigration Rules Appendix V: visitor rules

Immigration Rules for visitors.

APPENDIX V: Immigration Rules for visitors

Introduction

A visitor is a person who is coming to the UK, usually for up to six months, for a temporary purpose, for example as a tourist, to visit friends or family or to carry out a business activity.

Visitors cannot work or study in the UK unless this is allowed by the permitted activities that are set out in these Visitor Rules.

Each visitor must meet the requirements of these Visitor Rules, even if they are travelling as, for example, a family group, a tour group or a school party.

Applications are decided based on the information provided by the applicant and any other relevant circumstances at the date of decision.

Definitions of terms and phrases used in these Visitor Rules are in Appendix 1. Defined words are in italics.

PART V1. Entry to the UK

Types of permission to enter the UK

V 1.1 A person who wishes to enter the UK as a visitor must have permission to do so. That permission may be granted as a visit visa or as leave to enter.

Who needs a visit visa

V 1.2 A visa national must obtain a visit visa before they arrive in the UK. Appendix 2 sets out who is a visa national. A visa national who arrives in the UK without a visit visa will be refused leave to enter.

V 1.3 A non-visa national may apply for a visit visa, but is not required to unless they are: (a) visiting the UK to marry or to form a civil partnership, or to give notice of this; or (b) seeking to visit the UK for more than 6 months.

Who can apply for leave to enter on arrival

V 1.4 A non-visa national may apply for leave to enter as a visitor on arrival at the UK border, unless V 1.3 (a) or (b) applies.

Types and lengths of visit visa and leave to enter or remain

V 1.5 There are four types of visitor routes which depend on the purpose of the visit:

  Types of visit visa/Leave to enter or remain Visitors of this type can: The maximum length of stay that can be granted for each type of visitor:
(a) Visit (standard) Do the permitted activities in Appendix 3 except visitors entering under the Approved Destination Status agreement who may only do the activities in paragraph 3 of Appendix 3 to these Rules; up to 6 months, except: (i) a visitor who is coming to the UK for private medical treatment may be granted a visit visa of up to 11 months; or (ii) an academic, who is employed by an overseas institution and is carrying out the specific permitted activities paragraph 12 of Appendix 3, of these Rules, along with their spouse or partner and children, may be granted a visit visa of up to 12 months; or (iii) a visitor under the Approved Destination Status Agreement (ADS Agreement) may be granted a visit visa for a period of up to 30 days.
(b) Marriage / civil partnership visit Visit to marry or to form a civil partnership, or to give notice of this, in the UK, and do the permitted activities in Appendix 3; up to 6 months.
(c) Permitted Paid Engagements (PPE) visit Do the paid engagements in Appendix 4 and do the permitted activities in Appendix 3; up to 1 month.
(d) Transit visit Transit the UK. up to 48 hours, except for leave to enter as a transit visitor under the Transit Without Visa Scheme which may be granted until 23:59 hours on the next day after the day the applicant arrived.

V 1.6 Within the period for which the visit visa is valid, a visitor may enter and leave the UK multiple times, unless the visit visa is endorsed as a single- or dual-entry visa.

PART V2. Making an application for a visit visa

How to apply for a visit visa

V 2.1 An application for a visit visa must be made while the applicant is outside the UK.

  1. V 2.2 To apply for a visit visa the applicant must:
    1. (a) complete the online application process on the visas and immigration pages of the gov.uk website; and
    2. (b) pay any fee that applies; and
    3. (c) provide their biometrics if required; and
    4. (d) provide a valid travel document. Where the online application process is not available, the applicant must follow the instructions provided by the local visa post or application centre on how to make an application.

Date of application

V 2.3 An application for a visit visa is made on the date on which the fee is paid.

V 2.4 Where a fee is not required, the date of application is the date on which the application is submitted online.

V 2.5 Where a fee is not required and an online application is not available, the date of application is the date on which the paper application form is received by the relevant visa post or application centre.

Withdrawing an application and return of a travel document

V 2.6 An applicant may withdraw their application at any time before a decision is made on it. The request must be made in writing or email to the visa post or application centre where the application was submitted. When notice of withdrawal is received no decision will be made on the application and the applicant’s travel document and any other documents will be returned. The fee will not be refunded.

V 2.7 A request from an applicant for return of their travel document after an application has been submitted must be made in writing or email to the visa post or application centre where the application was submitted. It will be treated as a notice of withdrawal of the application, unless the visa post states otherwise.

PART V3. SUITABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL VISITORS

V 3.1 This Part applies to all applications for visit visas, leave to enter, and an extension of stay as a visitor except where explicitly stated otherwise.

Not conducive to the public good: exclusion and deportation

  1. V 3.2 An application will be refused if:
    1. (a) the Secretary of State has personally directed that the applicant’s exclusion from the UK is conducive to the public good; or
    2. (b) the applicant is currently the subject of a deportation order or a decision to make a deportation order.

V 3.3 An application will be refused if the decision maker believes that exclusion of the applicant from the UK is conducive to the public good because, for example, the applicant’s conduct (including convictions which do not fall within paragraph V 3.4), character, associations, or other reasons, make it undesirable to grant their application.

Not conducive to the public good: criminal convictions, etc.

  1. V 3.4 An application (except for an application for an extension of stay as a visitor) will be refused if the applicant has been convicted of a criminal offence for which they have been sentenced to a period of imprisonment of:
    1. (a) at least 4 years; or
    2. (b) between 12 months and 4 years, unless at least 10 years have passed since the end of the sentence; or
    3. (c) less than 12 months, unless at least 5 years has passed since the end of the sentence.
  2. Where this paragraph applies, it will only be in exceptional circumstances that the public interest in maintaining refusal will be outweighed by compelling factors.
  1. V 3.4A An application will be refused if the presence of the applicant in the UK is not conducive to the public good because they are a person to whom the Secretary of State:
    1. (a) has at any time decided that paragraph 339AA, 339AC, 339D or 339GB of these rules applies; or
    2. (b) has decided that paragraph 339AA, 339AC, 339D or 339GB of these rules would apply, but for the fact that (a) the person has not made a protection claim in the UK, or that (b) the person made a protection claim which was finally determined without reference to any of the relevant matters described in paragraphs 339AA, 339AC, 339D or 339GB.
  1. V 3.5 An application will normally be refused if:
    1. (a) within the period of 12 months before the application is decided, the applicant has been convicted of or admitted an offence for which they received a non-custodial sentence or out of court disposal that is recorded on their criminal record (except for an application for an extension of stay as a visitor); or
    2. (b) in the view of the Secretary of State the applicant’s offending has caused serious harm; or
    3. (c) in the view of the Secretary of State the applicant is a persistent offender who shows a particular disregard for the law.

False information in relation to an application

  1. V 3.6 An application will be refused where:
    1. (a) false representations have been made or false documents or information have been submitted (whether or not material to the application, and whether or not to the applicant’s knowledge); or
    2. (b) material facts have not been disclosed, in relation to their application or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party provided in support of their application.

Breaches of UK immigration laws

  1. V 3.7 An application, except an application for an extension of stay as a visitor, will be refused if:
    1. (a) the applicant previously breached UK immigration laws as described at V 3.9; and
    2. (b) the application is made within the relevant re-entry ban time period in V 3.10 (which time period is relevant will depend on the manner in which the applicant left the UK).

V 3.8 If the applicant has previously breached UK immigration laws but is outside the relevant re-entry ban time period the application will normally be refused if there are other aggravating circumstances, such as a failure to cooperate with immigration control or enforcement processes. This applies even where the applicant has overstayed for 90 days or less and left voluntarily and not at public expense.

  1. V 3.9 An applicant, when aged 18 years or over, breached the UK’s immigration laws:
    1. (a) by overstaying (except where this was for 90 days or less and they left the UK voluntarily and not at public expense); or
    2. (b) by breaching a condition attached to their leave; or
    3. (c) by being an illegal entrant; or
    4. (d) if deception was used in relation to an application or documents used in support of an application (whether successful or not).

V 3.10 The duration of a re-entry ban is as follows:

Duration of re entry ban from date they left the UK (or date of refusal of entry clearance under paragraph f) This applies where the applicant and and
(a) 12 months left voluntarily at their own expense. -
(b) 2 years left voluntarily at public expense Within 6 months of being given notice of liability for removal or when they no longer had a pending appeal or administrative review, whichever is later.
(c) 5 years left voluntarily at public expense, more than 6 months after being given notice of liability for removal or when they no longer had a pending appeal or administrative review, whichever is later.
(d) 5 years left or was removed from the UK as a condition of a caution issued in accordance with section 22 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 (and providing that any condition prohibiting their return to the UK has itself expired) -
(e) 10 years was deported from the UK or was removed from the UK at public expense -
(f) 10 years used deception in an application for entry clearance (including a visit visa). - -

V 3.11 Where more than one breach of the UK’s immigration laws has occurred, only the breach which leads to the longest period of absence from the UK will be relevant.

Failure to produce satisfactory identity documents or provide other information

  1. V 3.12 An applicant will be refused where the applicant:
    1. (a) fails to produce a valid travel document that satisfies the decision maker as to their identity and nationality except where paragraph V3.12A applies.
    2. (b) fails without reasonable excuse to comply with a requirement to:
      1. (i) attend an interview; or
      2. (ii) provide information; or
      3. (iii) provide biometrics; or
      4. (iv) undergo a medical examination or provide a medical report.
  2. V3.12A The document referred to in paragraph V3.12(a) does not need to satisfy the decision maker as to nationality where it was issued by the national authority of a state of which the person is not a national and the person’s statelessness or other status prevents the person from obtaining a document satisfactorily establishing the person’s nationality.

Medical

V 3.13 An applicant will normally be refused where, on the advice of the medical inspector, it is undesirable to grant the application for medical reasons.

Debt to the NHS

V 3.14 An applicant will normally be refused where a relevant NHS body has notified the Secretary of State that the applicant has failed to pay charges under relevant NHS regulations on charges to overseas visitors and the outstanding charges have a total value of at least £500.

Litigation costs

V3.14A An applicant will normally be refused where the applicant has failed to pay litigation costs awarded to the Home Office.

Admission to the Common Travel Area or other countries

V 3.15 An applicant will be refused where they are seeking entry to the UK with the intention of entering another part of the Common Travel Area, and fails to satisfy the decision maker that they are acceptable to the immigration authorities there.

V 3.16 An applicant will normally be refused where they fail to satisfy the decision maker that they will be admitted to another country after a stay in the UK.

PART V4. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR VISITORS (STANDARD)

  1. V 4.1 The decision maker must be satisfied that the applicant meets all of the eligibility requirements in paragraphs V 4.2 – V 4.10. The decision maker must be satisfied that the applicant meets any additional eligibility requirements, where the applicant:
    1. (a) is a child at the date of application, they must also meet the additional requirements at V 4.11 – V 4.13; or
    2. (b) is coming to the UK to receive private medical treatment, they must also meet the additional requirements at V 4.14 – V 4.16; or
    3. (c) is coming to the UK as an organ donor, they must also meet the additional requirements at V 4.17 – V 4.20; or
    4. (d) is coming to the UK under the ADS agreement, they must also meet the additional requirements at V 4.21; or
    5. (e) is an academic seeking a 12 month visit visa, they must also meet the additional requirements at V 4.22.

Genuine intention to visit

  1. V 4.2 The applicant must satisfy the decision maker that they are a genuine visitor. This means that the applicant:
    1. (a) will leave the UK at the end of their visit; and
    2. (b) will not live in the UK for extended periods through frequent or successive visits, or make the UK their main home; and
    3. (c) is genuinely seeking entry for a purpose that is permitted by the visitor routes (these are listed in Appendices 3, 4 and 5); and
    4. (d) will not undertake any prohibited activities set out in V 4.5 – V 4.10; and
    5. (e) must have sufficient funds to cover all reasonable costs in relation to their visit without working or accessing public funds. This includes the cost of the return or onward journey, any costs relating to dependants, and the cost of planned activities such as private medical treatment.

Funds, maintenance and accommodation provided by a third party

  1. V 4.3 A visitor’s travel, maintenance and accommodation may be provided by a third party where the decision maker is satisfied that they:
    1. (a) have a genuine professional or personal relationship with the visitor; and
    2. (b) are not, or will not be, in breach of UK immigration laws at the time of decision or the visitor’s entry to the UK; and
    3. (c) can and will provide support to the visitor for the intended duration of their stay.

V 4.4 The third party may be asked to give an undertaking in writing to be responsible for the applicant’s maintenance and accommodation. In this case paragraph 35 of Part 1 of these Rules applies also to Visitors. An applicant will normally be refused where, having been requested to do so, the applicant fails to provide a valid written undertaking from a third party to be responsible for their maintenance and accommodation for the period of any visit.

Prohibited activities

Work

  1. V 4.5 The applicant must not intend to work in the UK, which includes the following:
    1. (a) taking employment in the UK;
    2. (b) doing work for an organisation or business in the UK;
    3. (c) establishing or running a business as a self-employed person;
    4. (d) doing a work placement or internship;
    5. (e) direct selling to the public;
    6. (f) providing goods and services;
    7. unless expressly allowed by the permitted activities in Appendices 3, 4 or 5.

V 4.6 Permitted activities must not amount to the applicant taking employment, or doing work which amounts to them filling a role or providing short-term cover for a role within a UK based organisation. In addition, where the applicant is already paid and employed outside of the UK, they must remain so. Payment may only be allowed in specific circumstances set out in V 4.7.

Payment

  1. V 4.7 The applicant must not receive payment from a UK source for any activities undertaken in the UK, except for the following:
    1. (a) reasonable expenses to cover the cost of their travel and subsistence, including fees for directors attending board-level meetings; or
    2. (b) prize money; or
    3. (c) billing a UK client for their time in the UK, where the applicant’s overseas employer is contracted to provide services to a UK company, and the majority of the contract work is carried out overseas. Payment must be lower than the amount of the applicant’s salary; or
    4. (d) multi-national companies who, for administrative reasons, handle payment of their employees’ salaries from the UK; or
    5. (e) where the applicant is engaged in Permitted Paid Engagements (PPE) as listed at Appendix 4, provided the applicant holds a visa or leave to enter as a PPE visitor; or
    6. (f) paid performances at a permit free festival as listed in Appendix 5.

Study

V 4.8 The applicant must not intend to study in the UK, except as permitted by paragraph 25 of Appendix 3.

Medical

V 4.9 The applicant must not intend to access medical treatment other than private medical treatment or to donate an organ (for either of these activities they must meet the relevant additional requirements).

Marriage or civil partnership

V 4.10 The applicant must not intend to marry or form a civil partnership, or to give notice of this, in the UK, except where they have a visit visa endorsed for marriage or civil partnership.

Additional eligibility requirements for children

V 4.11 Adequate arrangements must have been made for their travel to, reception and care in the UK.

V 4.12 If the applicant is not applying or travelling with a parent or guardian based in their home country or country of ordinary residence who is responsible for their care; that parent or guardian must confirm that they consent to the arrangements for the child’s travel to, and reception and care in the UK. Where requested, this consent must be given in writing.

  1. V 4.13 A child who holds a visit visa must either:
    1. (a) hold a valid visit visa that states they are accompanied and will be travelling with an adult identified on that visit visa; or
    2. (b) hold a visit visa which states they are unaccompanied; if neither applies, the child may be refused entry unless they meet the requirements of V 4.12.

Additional eligibility requirements for visitors coming to the UK to receive private medical treatment

V 4.14 If the applicant is suffering from a communicable disease, they must have satisfied the medical inspector that they are not a danger to public health.

  1. V 4.15 The applicant must have arranged their private medical treatment before they travel to the UK, and must provide a letter from their doctor or consultant detailing:
    1. (a) the medical condition requiring consultation or treatment; and
    2. (b) the estimated costs and likely duration of any treatment which must be of a finite duration; and
    3. (c) where the consultation or treatment will take place.
  1. V 4.16 If the applicant is applying for an 11 month visit visa for the purposes of private medical treatment they must also:
    1. (a) provide evidence from their medical practitioner in the UK that the proposed treatment is likely to exceed 6 months but not more than 11 months; and
    2. (b) if required under paragraph A39 and Appendix T Part 1 of these Rules, provide a valid medical certificate issued by a medical practitioner listed in Appendix T Part 2 of these Rules confirming that they have undergone screening for active pulmonary tuberculosis and that this tuberculosis is not present in the applicant.

Additional eligibility requirements for visitors coming to the UK to donate an organ

V 4.17 An applicant must satisfy the decision maker that they genuinely intend to donate an organ, or be assessed as a potential organ donor, to an identified recipient in the UK with whom they have a genetic or close personal relationship.

V 4.18 The applicant must provide written confirmation of medical tests to show that they are a donor match to the identified recipient, or that they are undergoing further tests to be assessed as a potential donor to the identified recipient.

  1. V 4.19 The applicant must provide a letter, dated no more than three months prior to the applicant’s intended date of arrival in the UK from either:
    1. (a) the lead nurse or coordinator of the UK’s NHS Trust’s Living Donor kidney Transplant team; or
    2. (b) a UK registered medical practitioner who holds an NHS consultant post or who appears in the Specialist Register of the General Medical Council; which confirms that the visitor meets the requirements in V 4.17 and V 4.18 and confirms when and where the planned organ transplant or medical tests will take place.

V 4.20 The applicant must be able to demonstrate, if required to do so, that the identified recipient is legally present in the United Kingdom or will be at the time of the planned organ transplant.

Additional eligibility requirements for visitors coming under the ADS agreement

  1. V 4.21 An applicant under the Approved Destination Status (ADS) Agreement with China must:
    1. (a) be a national of the People’s Republic of China; and
    2. (b) intend to enter, leave and travel within the UK as a member of a tourist group under the ADS agreement.

Additional eligibility requirements for academics

  1. V 4.22 An academic applying for a 12 month visit visa (standard) must intend to do one (or more) of the permitted activities set out in paragraph 12 of Appendix 3; and:
    1. (a) be highly qualified within their own field of expertise; and
    2. (b) currently working in that field at an academic institution or institution of higher education overseas; and
    3. (c) if required under paragraph A39 and Appendix T Part 1 of these Rules, provide a valid medical certificate issued by a medical practitioner listed in Appendix T Part 2 of these Rules confirming that they have undergone screening for active pulmonary tuberculosis and that this tuberculosis is not present in the applicant

Conditions

  1. V 4.23 Visit visas, leave to enter or an extension of stay as a visitor will be subject to the following conditions:
    1. (a) no recourse to public funds; and
    2. (b) no study, except as permitted by paragraph 25 of Appendix 3; and
    3. (c) no work (which does not prohibit the permitted activities in Appendix 3, 4 or 5 as set out in V1.5).

PART V5. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR A PPE VISITOR

V 5.1 An applicant for permitted paid engagements must satisfy the decision maker that they meet the requirements at V 4.2 - V 4.10.

Additional eligibility requirements for a permitted paid engagements visit visa or leave to enter

  1. V 5.2 An applicant must intend to do one (or more) of the permitted paid engagements set out in Appendix 4 to these Rules, which must:
    1. (a) be arranged before the applicant travels to the UK; and
    2. (b) be declared as part of the application for a visit visa or leave to enter; and
    3. (c) be evidenced by a formal invitation, as required by Appendix 4; and
    4. (d) relate to the applicant’s area of expertise and occupation overseas.

V 5.3 An applicant must not be a child.

PART V6. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR A MARRIAGE OR CIVIL PARTNERSHIP VISIT VISA

V 6.1 An applicant for a marriage or civil partnership visit visa must satisfy the decision maker that they meet the requirements at V 4.2 - V 4.10 and must be aged 18 or over.

V 6.2 On arrival in the UK a visitor coming to marry or form a civil partnership, or give notice of this, in the UK must have a valid visit visa endorsed with this purpose and the name of the holder’s fiancé(e) or proposed civil partner.

Additional eligibility requirements for a marriage or civil partnership visit visa

  1. V 6.3 An applicant seeking to come to the UK as a visitor who wishes to give notice of marriage or civil partnership, or marry or form a civil partnership, in the UK during that visit must satisfy the decision maker that they:
    1. (a) intend to give notice of marriage or civil partnership; or
    2. (b) intend to marry or form a civil partnership; and
    3. (c) do not intend to give notice of or enter into a sham marriage or sham civil partnership, within the validity period covered by their visit visa.

PART V7. TRANSIT VISITOR

Transit visitor

V 7.1 A transit visitor is a person who seeks to travel via the UK en route to another destination country outside the common travel area.

V 7.2 Individuals seeking to transit the UK without passing through the UK border may need a Direct Airside Transit Visa. These are provided for by the Immigration (Passenger Transit Visa) Order 2014 (as amended).

V 7.3 This Part does not apply to crew members who are employed in the working or service of their ship, aircraft, hovercraft, hydrofoil or train who fall under section 8(1) of the Immigration Act 1971.

V 7.4 A visa national must either hold a transit visit visa or, if they meet the requirements for admission under the transit without visa scheme in V 7.6 – V 7.8, they may seek leave to enter at the UK border.

Eligibility requirements for a transit visa or leave to enter for transit

  1. V 7.5 An applicant must satisfy the decision maker that they:
    1. (a) are genuinely in transit to another country outside the common travel area, meaning the main purpose of their visit is to transit the UK and that the applicant is taking a reasonable transit route; and
    2. (b) will not access public funds or medical treatment, work or study in the UK; and
    3. (c) genuinely intend and are able to leave the UK within 48 hours after their arrival; and
    4. (d) are assured entry to their country of destination and any other countries they are transiting on their way there.

Transit Without Visa Scheme

V 7.6 To be granted leave to enter under the transit without visa scheme a visa national must meet all the requirements at V 7.7 and one of the requirements at V 7.8.

  1. V 7.7 The applicant must:
    1. (a) have arrived by air and will be departing by air; and
    2. (b) be genuinely in transit to another country, meaning the purpose of their visit is to transit the UK and that the applicant is taking a reasonable transit route; and
    3. (c) will not access public funds or medical treatment, work or study in the UK; and
    4. (d) genuinely intend and be able to leave the UK before 23:59 hours on the day after the day when they arrived; and
    5. (e) have a confirmed booking on a flight departing the UK before 23:59 hours on the day after the day when they arrived; and
    6. (f) be assured entry to their country of destination and any other countries they are transiting through on their way there.
  1. V 7.8 The applicant must also:
    1. (a) be travelling to or from (or on part of a reasonable journey to or from) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the USA and have a valid visa for that country; or
    2. (b) be travelling from (or on part of a reasonable journey from) Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the USA and it is less than 6 months since he last entered that country with a valid entry visa; or
    3. (c) hold a valid permanent residence permit issued by either:
      1. (i) Australia;
      2. (ii) Canada, issued after 28 June 2002;
      3. (iii) New Zealand; or
    4. (d) hold a valid USA, I-551 permanent resident card issued on or after 21 April 1998; or
    5. (e) hold a valid USA I-551 temporary immigrant visa (a wet-ink stamp version will not be accepted); or
    6. (f) hold an expired USA I-551 permanent resident card issued on or after 21 April 1998, provided it is accompanied by a valid I-797 letter authorising extension of the period of permanent residency; or
    7. (g) hold a valid standalone US immigration form 155A/155B attached to a sealed brown envelope; or
    8. (h) hold a valid common format residence permit issued by an EEA state (pursuant to Council Regulation (EC) No. 1030/2002) or Switzerland; or
    9. (i) hold a valid uniform format category D visa for entry to a state in the European Economic Area (EEA) or Switzerland; or
    10. (j) be travelling on to the Republic of Ireland and have a valid Irish biometric visa; or
    11. (k) be travelling from the Republic of Ireland and it is less than three months since the applicant was last given permission to land or be in the Republic by the Irish authorities with a valid Irish biometric visa.

V 7.8.1 Paragraph V 7.8 (a) and (b) shall not apply where the transit passenger is a citizen or national of Syria holding a B1 or B2 category visa for entry to the United States of America.

V 7.9 Electronic versions of any documents listed in paragraph V7.8, such as electronic visas (including printed versions), will not be accepted.

PART V8. EXTENSION OF STAY AS A VISITOR

Who can apply for an extension of stay as a visitor

V 8.1 It is not possible to switch to become a visitor while in the UK where a person is in the UK in breach of immigration laws or has entry clearance or leave to enter or remain for another purpose.

Making an application for an extension of stay as a visitor in the UK

V 8.2 An application for an extension of stay as a visitor must comply with the requirements in paragraphs 34 – 34C of Part 1 of these Rules.

Eligibility requirements for an extension of stay in the UK as a visitor

V 8.3 The applicant must be in the UK as a visitor. Visitors for permitted paid engagements and transit visitors may not apply for an extension of stay as a visitor.

V 8.4 An application for an extension of stay as a visitor must satisfy the decision maker that they continue to meet all the suitability and eligibility requirements for a visit visa.

V 8.5 The applicant must not be in the UK in breach of immigration laws, except that where paragraph 39E of these Rules applies, any current period of overstaying will be disregarded.

  1. V 8.6 If the applicant is applying for an extension of stay as a visitor for the purpose of receiving private medical treatment they must also satisfy the decision maker they:
    1. (a) have met the costs of any medical treatment received so far; and
    2. (b) provide a letter from a registered medical practitioner, at a private practice or NHS hospital, who holds an NHS consultant post or who appears in the Specialist Register of the General Medical Council, detailing the medical condition requiring further treatment.

How long can a visitor extend their stay in the UK

V 8.7 A visitor (standard) and a visitor for marriage or civil partnership, who was granted a visit visa or leave to enter for less than 6 months may be granted an extension of stay as a visitor so that the total period they can remain the UK (including both the original grant and the extension of stay) does not exceed 6 months.

V 8.8 A visitor (standard) who is in the UK for private medical treatment may be granted an extension of stay as a visitor for a further 6 months, provided this is for private medical treatment.

V 8.9 A visitor (standard) who is an academic on sabbatical leave and is in the UK undertaking their own research, or the spouse, partner or child accompanying such an academic, can be granted an extension of stay as a visitor so that the total period they can remain in the UK (including both the original grant and the extension of stay) does not exceed 12 months.

V 8.10 A visitor (standard) may be granted an extension of stay as a visitor for up to 6 months in order to resit the Professional and Linguistic Assessment Board (PLAB) Test, provided they meet the requirements at Appendix 3, paragraph 22(b)(i).

V 8.11 A visitor (standard) who is successful in the Professional and Linguistic Assessment Board Test may be granted an extension of stay as a visitor to undertake an unpaid clinical attachment, provided they meet the requirements of Appendix 3, paragraph 22(a) so that the total period they can remain in the UK (including both the original grant and the extension of stay) does not exceed 18 months.

PART V9. GROUNDS FOR CANCELLATION OF A VISIT VISA OR LEAVE BEFORE OR ON ARRIVAL AT THE UK BORDER AND CURTAILMENT OF LEAVE

Cancellation of a visit visa or leave to enter or remain as a visitor on or before arrival at the UK border

V 9.1 A current visit visa or leave to enter or remain as a visitor may be cancelled whilst the person is outside the UK or on arrival in the UK, if any of paragraphs V 9.2 – V 9.7 apply.

Change of circumstances

V 9.2 Where there has been such a change in the circumstances of the case since the visit visa or leave to enter or remain was granted that the basis of the visitor’s claim to admission or stay has been removed and the visa or leave should be cancelled.

Change of purpose

V 9.3 Where the visitor holds a visit visa and their purpose in arriving in the United Kingdom is different from the purpose specified in the visit visa.

False information or failure to disclose a material fact

  1. V 9.4 Where:
    1. (a) false representations were made or false documents or information submitted (whether or not material to the application, and whether or not to the applicant’s knowledge); or
    2. (b) material facts were not disclosed, in relation to the application for a visit visa or leave to enter or remain as a visitor, or in order to obtain documents from the Secretary of State or a third party provided in support of their application.

Medical

V 9.5 Where it is undesirable to admit the visitor to the UK for medical reasons, unless there are strong compassionate reasons justifying admission.

Not conducive to the public good

V 9.6 Where the criteria in V 3.2 - V 3.5. apply.

Failure to supply information

V 9.7 Where the person is outside the UK and there is a failure to supply any information, documents, or medical reports requested by a decision maker.

Curtailment

V 9.8 A visit visa or leave to enter or remain as a visitor may be curtailed while the person is in the UK if any of paragraphs V 9.9 – V 9.13 apply.

False information or failure to disclose a material fact

  1. V 9.9 Where:
    1. (a) false representations were made or false documents or information were submitted (whether or not material to the application, and whether or not to the applicant’s knowledge); or
    2. (b) material facts were not disclosed, in relation to any application for an entry clearance or leave to enter or remain, or for the purpose of obtaining either a document from the Secretary of State or third party required in support of the application, or a document from the Secretary of State that indicates the person has a right to reside in the UK.

Requirements of the Rules

V 9.10 If the visitor ceases to meet the requirements of the Visitor Rules.

Failure to comply with conditions

V 9.11 If the visitor fails to comply with any conditions of their leave to enter or remain.

Not conducive to the public good

  1. V 9.12 Where either:
    1. (a) the visitor has, within the first 6 months of being granted a visit visa or leave to enter, committed an offence for which they are subsequently sentenced to a period of imprisonment; or
    2. (b) in the view of the Secretary of State the applicant’s offending has caused serious harm; or
    3. (c) in the view of the Secretary of State the applicant is a persistent offender who shows a particular disregard for the law; or
    4. (d) it would be undesirable to permit the visitor to remain in the UK in light of their conduct, character, associations, or the fact that they represent a threat to national security.

APPENDICES TO THE IMMIGRATION RULES FOR VISITORS

VISITORS APPENDIX 1. DEFINITIONS AND INTERPRETATIONS

1 For the purposes of these Visitor Rules the following definitions and interpretations apply:

accredited institution in relation to permitted study, this means an institution which is: (a) the holder of a Tier 4 sponsor licence; or (b) the holder of valid accreditation from Accreditation UK, the Accreditation Body for Language Services (ABLS), the British Accreditation Council (BAC), or the Accreditation Service for International Colleges (ASIC); or (c) the holder of a valid and satisfactory full institutional inspection, review or audit by the Bridge Schools Inspectorate, Estyn, Education Scotland, the Independent Schools Inspectorate, Office for Standards in Education, the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, the Schools Inspection Service or the Education and Training Inspectorate Northern Ireland; or (d) an overseas higher education institution offering only part of its programmes in the UK, holding its own national accreditation and offering programmes that are an equivalent level to a UK degree.
ADS Agreement means the Memorandum of Understanding on visa and related issues concerning tourist groups from the People’s Republic of China to the United Kingdom as a approved destination, signed on 21 January 2005.
application centre means a commercial partner who has been authorised by the Secretary of State to accept entry clearance applications or British Diplomatic Mission or Consular Post overseas where entry clearance applications can be made.
biometrics has the same meaning as in section 15 of the UK Borders Act, for example, fingerprints.
child means a person under the age of 18 years.
Common Travel Area the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man and the Republic of Ireland collectively form the common travel area.
condition means any condition of leave to enter or remain under section 3(1) (c) of the Immigration Act 1971, such as a prohibition on employment or study.
control zone means a control zone for the time being as defined by article 2(1) of, and Schedule 1 to, the Channel Tunnel (International Arrangements) Order 1993 (SI 1993/1813) and article 2 of the Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 (Juxtaposed Controls) Order 2003 (SI 2003/2818).
convicted of a criminal offence means a conviction for a criminal offence in the UK or any other country providing that where the offence was committed and the person was convicted outside the UK, the offence would, if it was committed in the UK (or any part of the UK) also constitute a criminal offence in the UK.
deception means making false representations or submitting false documents or information (whether or not material to the application), or failing to disclose material facts.
decision maker means an entry clearance officer, immigration officer or the Secretary of State as the case may be.
end of the sentence means the end of the sentence imposed whether or not all of it has been served in prison.
extension of stay means leave to remain as a visitor granted under the Immigration Act 1971.
fee means any fee payable under regulations made in exercise of the powers conferred by sections 68 and 69 of the Immigration Act 2014.
guardian means a person appointed according to local laws to take care of a child.
illegal entrant has the same meaning as in section 33(1) of the Immigration Act 1971.
leave to enter has the same meaning as in section 3 of the Immigration Act 1971.
medical inspector means a medical inspector appointed under Schedule 2 to the Immigration Act 1971.
non-custodial sentence means a sentence other than a sentence of imprisonment.
non-visa national means a person who does not require a visit visa under Appendix 2 to these Visitor Rules.
notice of liability for removal has the same meaning as in paragraph 6 of these Rules
out of court disposal means a penalty imposed for an offence without prosecution, e.g. a caution.
overstayed or overstaying means the applicant has stayed in the UK beyond the time limit attached to the last period of leave granted (including any extension of that leave , or under sections 3C or 3D of the Immigration Act 1971).
parent includes (a) the stepfather of a child whose father is dead and the reference to stepfather includes a relationship arising through civil partnership; (b) the stepmother of a child whose mother is dead and the reference to stepmother includes a relationship arising through civil partnership and; (c) the father as well as the mother of an illegitimate child where he is proved to be the father; (d) an adoptive parent, where a child was adopted in accordance with a decision taken by the competent administrative authority or court in a country whose adoption orders are recognised by the UK or where a child is the subject of a de facto adoption in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 309A of these Rules.
pending appeal has the same meaning as in section 104 of the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.
period of imprisonment means a period of imprisonment in the UK or outside the UK (subject to the matters mentioned in section 38(2) of the UK Borders Act 2007).
private medical treatment means treatment provided by a private health provider, or by the NHS where there is a reciprocal arrangement in place with another country by which certain nationals may receive NHS treatment.
public expense in relation to a person’s departure from the UK, means directly or indirectly at the expense of the Secretary of State.
public funds means (a) housing under Part VI or VII of the Housing Act 1996 and under Part II of the Housing Act 1985, Part I or II of the Housing (Scotland) Act 1987, Part II of the Housing (Northern Ireland) Order 1981 or Part II of the Housing (Northern Ireland) Order 1988; (b) attendance allowance, severe disablement allowance, carer’s allowance and disability living allowance under Part III of the Social Security Contribution and Benefits Act 1992;, income support, council tax benefit and housing benefit under Part VII of that Act; a social fund payment under Part VIII of that Act; child benefit under Part IX of that Act; income based jobseeker’s allowance under the Jobseekers Act 1995, income related allowance under Part 1 of the Welfare Reform Act 2007 (employment and support allowance) state pension credit under the State Pension Credit Act 2002; or child tax credit and working tax credit under Part 1 of the Tax Credits Act 2002; (c) attendance allowance, severe disablement allowance, carer’s allowance and disability living allowance under Part III of the Social Security Contribution and Benefits (Northern Ireland) Act 1992;, income support, council tax benefit and, housing benefit under Part VII of that Act; a social fund payment under Part VIII of that Act; child benefit under Part IX of that Act; income based jobseeker’s allowance under the Jobseekers (Northern Ireland) Order 1995 or income related allowance under Part 1 of the Welfare Reform Act (Northern Ireland) 2007; (d) Universal Credit under Part 1 of the Welfare Reform Act 2012 or Personal Independence Payment under Part 4 of that Act; (e) Universal Credit, Personal Independence Payment or any domestic rate relief under the Northern Ireland Welfare Reform Act 2013; (f) a council tax reduction under a council tax reduction scheme made under section 13A of the Local Government Finance Act 1992 in relation to England or Wales or a council tax reduction pursuant to the Council Tax Reduction (Scotland) Regulations 2012 or the Council Tax Reduction (State Pension Credit) (Scotland) Regulations 2012. Paragraphs (6A), (6B) and (6C) of the Immigration Rules also apply.
recreational course means a course undertaken purely for leisure purposes, for example, pottery or horse riding.
relevant NHS body means a) in relation to England- (i) a National Health Service Trust established under section 25 of the National Health Service Act 2006, (ii) a NHS foundation trust. b) in relation to Wales- (i) a Local Health Board established under section 11 of the National Health Service (Wales) Act 2006, (ii) a National Health Service Trust established under section 18 of the National Health Service (Wales) Act 2006, (iii) a Special Health Authority established under 22 of the National Health Service (Wales) Act 2006. c) in relation to Scotland- (i) a Health Board or Special Health Board established under section 2 of the National Health Service (Scotland) Act 1978 (c. 29), (ii) the Common Services Agency for the Scottish Health Service established under section 10 of that Act, (iii) Healthcare Improvement Scotland established under section 10A of that Act. d) in relation to Northern Ireland- (i) the Regional Health and Social Care Board established under the Health and Social Care (Reform) Act (Northern Ireland) 2009, (ii) a Health and Social Care trust established under the Health and Personal Social Services (Northern Ireland) Order 1991 (S.I. 1991/194 (N.I. 1)) and renamed under the Health and Social Care (Reform) Act (Northern Ireland) 2009.
relevant NHS regulations means (i) The National Health Service (Charges to Overseas Visitors) (Amendment) (Wales) Regulations 2004 (2004 No 1433); (ii) The National Health Service (Charges to Overseas Visitors) (Scotland) Regulations 1989 as amended (1989 No 364); (iii) The Health and Personal Social Services (Provision of Health Services to Persons not Ordinarily Resident) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2005 (2005 No 551); or (iv) The National Health Service (Charges to Overseas Visitors) Regulations (2011 No 1556).
sham marriage & sham civil partnership this has the same meaning as in sections 24(5) and 24A(5) of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999.
specified application form means a form which is posted on the visa and immigration pages of the GOV.UK website.
supplementary control zone means the supplementary control zone within the meaning of Article 2(1) and Schedule 1 to the Channel Tunnel (International Agreements) Order 1993 (SI 1993/1813).
travel document means a valid passport or other document that allows the holder to travel internationally and which (i) complies with international passport practice; (ii) is not issued by a territory that: is not recognised by Her Majesty’s government as a state; or is not dealt with as a government by them; or does not accept valid UK passports for the purpose of its own immigration control.
UK border means immigration control at a UK port and a control zone in France or Belgium or a supplementary control zone in France as defined by Article 2(1) and Schedule 1 to the Channel Tunnel (International Arrangements) Order 1993 (SI 1993/1813) and Article 3 of the Nationality Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 (Juxtaposed Controls) Order 2003 (SI 2003/2818).
UK Higher Education Institution means a body that receives public funding as a UK Higher Education Institution from the: - Department for Employment and Learning in Northern Ireland; - Higher Education Funding Council for England; - Higher Education Funding Council for Wales; or - Scottish Funding Council. And Richmond, the American International University in London.
visa national persons specified in Appendix 2 to Appendix V: Visitors who need a visa for the United Kingdom for a visit or for any other purposes where seeking entry for 6 months or less.
visa post means a British Diplomatic Mission or Consular Post overseas or other office nominated by the Secretary of State where entry clearance applications are considered. Applicants can find the relevant local application centre on gov.uk.
visit visa means an entry clearance for the purpose of a visit under section 33 of the Immigration Act 1971. It is normally a vignette in the holder’s passport. It includes entry clearances for visitors that were issued under paragraphs 40-56, 56D-56J, 56N-56Z, 75A-75M of these Rules and Appendix V.

APPENDIX 2. VISA NATIONAL LIST

  1. 1 People who meet one or more of the criteria below need a visa in advance of travel to the UK as a visitor or for any other purpose for less than six months, unless they meet one of the exceptions set out in this Appendix:
    1. (a) Nationals or citizens of the following countries or territorial entities (a “*” indicates there are exceptions in paragraphs 2 - 19):
     
Afghanistan Laos  
Albania Lebanon  
Algeria Lesotho  
Angola Liberia  
Armenia Libya  
Azerbaijan Macedonia  
Bahrain* Madagascar  
Bangladesh Malawi  
Belarus Mali  
Benin Mauritania  
Bhutan Moldova  
Bolivia Mongolia  
Bosnia Herzegovina Montenegro  
Burkina Faso Morocco  
Burma Mozambique  
Burundi Nepal  
Cambodia Niger  
Cameroon Nigeria  
Cape Verde Oman*  
Central African Republic Pakistan  
Chad Peru  
People’s Republic of China* Philippines  
Colombia Qatar*  
Comoros Russia  
Congo Rwanda  
Cuba Sao Tome e Principe  
Democratic Republic of the Congo Saudi Arabia  
Djibouti Senegal  
Dominican Republic Serbia  
Ecuador Sierra Leone  
Egypt Somalia  
Equatorial Guinea South Africa*  
Eritrea South Sudan  
Ethiopia Sri Lanka  
Fiji Sudan  
Gabon Suriname  
Gambia Swaziland  
Georgia Syria  
Ghana Taiwan*  
Guinea Tajikistan  
Guinea Bissau Tanzania  
Guyana Thailand  
Haiti Togo  
India Tunisia  
Indonesia* Turkey *  
Iran Turkmenistan  
Iraq Uganda  
Ivory Coast Ukraine  
Jamaica United Arab Emirates*  
Jordan Uzbekistan  
Kazakhstan Venezuela  
Kenya Vietnam*  
Korea (North) Yemen  
Kosovo Zambia  
Kuwait * Zimbabwe  
Kyrgyzstan    

(b) Stateless people. (c) People travelling on any document other than a national passport, regardless of whether the document is issued by or evidences nationality of a state not listed in (a), except where that document has been issued by the UK.

Exceptions to the list of visa nationals

Holders of specified travel documents

  1. A2 It is not necessary for a transit visitor to hold a visa before they travel to the UK if they are travelling on an emergency travel document issued by, and evidencing the nationality of, a state not listed in paragraph 1(a) and the purpose of their transit visit is to travel to the state in which they are ordinarily resident.
  1. 2 Subject to paragraph 3, the following people do not need a visa before they travel to the UK as a visitor:
    1. a) nationals or citizens of the People’s Republic of China who hold a passport issued by the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region; or
    2. b) nationals or citizens of the People’s Republic of China who hold a passport issued by the Macao Special Administrative Region; or
    3. c) nationals or citizens of Taiwan who hold a passport issued by Taiwan that includes in it the number of the identification card issued by the competent authority in Taiwan; or
    4. d) people who hold a Service, Temporary Service or Diplomatic passport issued by the Holy See; or
    5. e) nationals or citizens of Oman who hold a diplomatic or special passport issued by Oman; or
    6. f) nationals or citizens of Qatar who hold a diplomatic or special passport issued by Qatar; or
    7. g) nationals or citizens of the United Arab Emirates who hold a diplomatic or special passport issued by the United Arab Emirates; or
    8. h) nationals or citizens of Turkey who hold a diplomatic passport issued by Turkey; or
    9. i) nationals or citizens of Kuwait who hold a diplomatic or special passport issued by Kuwait; or
    10. j) nationals or citizens of Bahrain who hold a diplomatic or special passport issued by Bahrain; or
    11. k) nationals or citizens of South Africa who hold a diplomatic passport issued by South Africa; or
    12. l) nationals or citizens of Vietnam who hold a diplomatic passport issued by Vietnam; or
    13. m) nationals or citizens of Indonesia who hold a diplomatic passport issued by Indonesia.
  1. 3 Paragraph 2 does not apply where a person is :
    1. 1. visiting the UK to marry or to form a civil partnership, or to give notice of this; or
    2. 2. seeking to visit the UK for more than 6 months.

Exception to visa nationals where the applicant holds an Electronic Visa Waiver Document (Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and United Arab Emirates passport holders only)

Objective

  1. 4 Subject to paragraph 5A, under the Electronic Visa Waiver (EVW) scheme, holders of a valid EVW document (i.e. a document which meets the validity requirements in paragraphs A8 – 13 of this Appendix) do not need to obtain a visit visa, or a visa for entry for six months or less where there is no mandatory entry clearance requirement, in advance of arrival in the UK, but can instead apply for leave to enter at the UK border.
  2. 5 Only passport holders of Kuwait, Oman, Qatar or the United Arab Emirates can hold and use an EVW document.
  3. 5A Holders of a EVW Document will need to obtain a visa where the EVW Document is not used in the manner specified in paragraphs 14-18 of this Appendix (meaning that they will normally be refused entry to the UK).
  4. 6 An EVW Document relates to one person and may only be used for one application for leave to enter the UK or, where applicable, one crossing of the land border from the Republic of Ireland.

Obtaining an Electronic Visa Waiver Document

7 To obtain an EVW, a person mentioned in paragraph 5 of this Appendix must provide the required biographic and travel information at the website established by the UK Government at https://www.electronic-visa-waiver.service.gov.uk/

Electronic Visa Waiver Document validity requirements

  1. A8 The biographic details on the EVW Document must match those of the holder’s passport.
  2. 8 The EVW Document must specify the flight, train or ship on which the holder intends to arrive in the UK, including the port of departure and arrival, and the scheduled date and time of departure and arrival, unless paragraph 9 or 10 of this Appendix applies.
  3. 9 Where the holder of an EVW Document is seeking to arrive in the UK by entering a control zone in France or Belgium or supplementary control zone in France, the EVW must specify the train or ship on which they intend to arrive in the UK, including:
    1. (a) the railway station or port where the holder intends to enter the control zone or supplementary control zone and from which the holder intends to depart for the UK; and
    2. (b) the railway station or port at which the holder intends to leave the train or ship after arrival in the UK; and
    3. (c) the scheduled date and time of departure from, and arrival at, the specified railway stations or ports.
  4. 10 Where the holder of an EVW Document intends to cross the land border from the Republic of Ireland to the UK by train, car or any other means, the EVW must specify the place at which it is intended to cross the border and the intended date and time of arrival in the UK.
  5. 11 When the EVW Document is issued it must be printed in a legible form and in English.
  6. 12 An EVW Document is only valid if the required information has been submitted at least 48 hours before the holder departs on a flight, train or ship to the UK or crosses the UK land border from the Republic of Ireland by train, car or any other means.
  7. 13 An EVW Document may not be issued more than 3 months before the date of the holder’s scheduled departure to the UK as specified on the EVW Document or, where the holder intends to cross the land border with the Republic of Ireland, before the intended date of the holder’s arrival in the UK as specified on the EVW Document.

How an Electronic Visa Waiver Document must be used

  1. 14 The holder must present the EVW Document to an Immigration Officer on request upon the holder’s arrival at the UK Border or, where the holder is seeking to arrive in the UK by entering a control zone in France or Belgium or a supplementary control zone in France, upon arrival in that zone.
  2. 15 The EVW Document must be surrendered to an Immigration Officer upon request.
  3. 16 The holder must travel on the flight, train or ship specified on the EVW Document unless 18 or 19 applies.
  4. 17 If the holder travels on a different flight, train or ship this must depart from the same port or railway station and arrive at the same UK port or railway station as specified on the EVW Document; and either
    1. (a) depart after the departure time specified on the EVW Document and arrive in the UK no more than 8 hours after the arrival time specified on the EVW Document; or
    2. (b) if the holder is seeking to arrive in the UK by entering a control zone in France or Belgium or a supplementary control zone in France, arrive no more than 8 hours after, the departure time specified on the EVW Document.
  5. 18 If the holder is seeking to arrive in the UK by crossing the land border from the Republic of Ireland, the holder must cross at the time specified on the EVW Document or no more than 8 hours after the time specified on the EVW Document.

VISITORS APPENDIX 3. PERMITTED ACTIVITIES FOR ALL VISITORS (EXCEPT TRANSIT VISITORS)

  1. 1 All visitors are permitted to undertake the activities listed in paragraphs 3 – 27 of this Appendix provided they meet the requirements at V 4.5- V 4.8. Visitors coming to the UK under the ADS agreement may only do activities in paragraph 3 of this appendix.
  2. 2 Visitors may only receive payment where allowed by V 4.7.

Tourism and leisure

  1. 3 A visitor may visit friends and family and / or come to the UK for a holiday.

Volunteering

  1. 4 A visitor may undertake incidental volunteering (i.e. the main purpose of the visit is not to volunteer), provided it lasts no more than 30 days in total and is for a charity that is registered with either the Charity Commission for England and Wales; the Charity Commission for Northern Ireland; or the Office of the Scottish Charity Regulator.

Business – general activities

  1. 5 A visitor may:
    1. (a) attend meetings, conferences, seminars, interviews;
    2. (b) give a one-off or short series of talks and speeches provided these are not organised as commercial events and will not make a profit for the organiser;
    3. (c) negotiate and sign deals and contracts;
    4. (d) attend trade fairs, for promotional work only, provided the visitor is not directly selling;
    5. (e) carry out site visits and inspections;
    6. (f) gather information for their employment overseas;
    7. (g) be briefed on the requirements of a UK based customer, provided any work for the customer is done outside of the UK.

Business – corporate

Intra-corporate activities

  1. 6 An employee of an overseas based company may:
    1. (a) advise and consult;
    2. (b) trouble-shoot;
    3. (c) provide training;
    4. (d) share skills and knowledge; on a specific internal project with UK employees of the same corporate group, provided no work is carried out directly with clients.
  2. 7 An internal auditor may carry out regulatory or financial audits at a UK branch of the same group of companies as the visitor’s employer overseas.

Prospective Entrepreneur

  1. 8 A visitor who can show support from:
    1. (a) one or more registered venture capitalist firms regulated by the financial conduct authority; or
    2. (b) one or more UK entrepreneurial seed funding competitions which is listed as endorsed on www.gov.uk/government/publications/entrepreneurs-setting-up-in-the-uk/entrepreneurs-setting-up-in-the-uk; or
    3. (c) one or more UK Government Departments; may come to the UK for discussions to secure funding from one of the above sources which they intend to use to join, set up or take over a business in the UK.

Manufacturing and supply of goods to the UK

  1. 9 An employee of a foreign manufacturer or supplier may install, dismantle, repair, service or advise on equipment, computer software or hardware where it has a contract of purchase or supply or lease with a UK company or organisation.

Clients of UK export companies

  1. 10 A client of a UK export company may be seconded to the UK company in order to oversee the requirements for goods and services that are being provided under contract by the UK company or its subsidiary company, provided the two companies are not part of the same group. Employees may exceptionally make multiple visits to cover the duration of the contract.

Business – specific sectors

Science, research and academia

  1. 11 Scientists and researchers may:
    1. (a) gather information and facts for a specific project which directly relates to their employment overseas;
    2. (b) share knowledge or advise on an international project that is being led from the UK, provided the visitor is not carrying our research in the UK.
  2. 12 Academics may:
    1. (a) take part in formal exchange arrangements with UK counterparts (including doctors);
    2. (b) carry out research for their own purposes if they are on sabbatical leave from their home institution;
    3. (c) if they are an eminent senior doctor or dentist, take part in research, teaching or clinical practice provided this does not amount to filling a permanent teaching post.
  1. 13 An expert witness may visit the UK to give evidence in a UK court. Other witnesses may visit the UK to attend a court hearing in the UK if summoned in person by a UK court.
  2. 14 An overseas lawyer may advise a UK based client on specific international litigation and/or an international transaction.

Religion

15 Religious workers may visit the UK to preach or do pastoral work.

Creative

  1. 16 An artist, entertainer, or musician may:
    1. (a) give performances as an individual or as part of a group;
    2. (b) take part in competitions or auditions;
    3. (c) make personal appearances and take part in promotional activities;
    4. (d) take part in one or more cultural events or festivals on the list of permit free festivals in Appendix 5 (where payment is permitted).
  1. 17 Personal or technical staff or members of the production team of an artist, entertainer or musician may support the activities in paragraph 16 of this Appendix or paragraph 1(e) of Appendix 4, provided they are attending the same event as the artist, entertainer or musician, and are employed to work for them outside of the UK.
  2. 18 Film crew (actor, producer, director or technician) employed by an overseas company may visit the UK to take part in a location shoot for a film or programme that is produced and financed overseas.

Sport

  1. 19 A sports person may:
    1. (a) take part in a sports tournament or sports event as an individual or part of a team;
    2. (b) make personal appearances and take part in promotional activities;
    3. (c) take part in trials provided they are not in front of a paying audience;
    4. (d) take part in short periods of training provided they are not being paid by a UK sporting body;
    5. (e) join an amateur team or club to gain experience in a particular sport if they are an amateur in that sport.
  2. 20 Personal or technical staff of the sports person, or sports officials, may support the activities in paragraph 19 of this Appendix or in paragraph 1(e) of Appendix 4, if they are attending the same event as the sports person. Personal or technical staff of the sports person must be employed to work for the sports person outside the UK.

Business - overseas roles requiring specific activities in the UK

  1. 21 Individuals employed outside the UK may visit the UK to take part in the following activities in relation to their employment overseas:
    1. (a) a translator and/or interpreter may support a business person in the UK, provided they will attend the same event(s) as the business person and are employed by that business person outside of the UK;
    2. (b) personal assistants and bodyguards may support an overseas business person in carrying out permitted activities, provided they will attend the same event(s) as the business person and are employed by them outside the UK. They must not be providing personal care or domestic work for the business person;
    3. (c) a driver on a genuine international route delivering goods or passengers from abroad to the UK;
    4. (d) a tour group courier, contracted to a company with its headquarters outside the UK, who is entering and departing the UK with a tour group organised by their company;
    5. (e) a journalist, correspondent, producer or cameraman gathering information for an overseas publication, programme or film;
    6. (f) archaeologists taking part in a one-off archaeological excavation;
    7. (g) a professor from an overseas academic institution accompanying students to the UK as part of a study abroad programme, may provide a small amount of teaching to the students at the host organisation. However this must not amount to filling a permanent teaching role for that institution.
  1. 22 Overseas graduates from medical, dental or nursing schools may:
    1. (a) undertake clinical attachments or dental observer posts provided these are unpaid, and involve no treatment of patients. The visitor must provide written confirmation of their offer to take up this post and confirm they have not previously undertaken this activity in the UK;
    2. (b) take the following test/examination in the UK:
      1. (i) the Professional and Linguistic Assessment Board (PLAB) test, where the visitor can provide written confirmation of this from the General Medical Council; or
      2. (ii) the Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) for overseas, where the visitor can provide written evidence of this from the Nursing and Midwifery Council.
  1. 23 Employees of an overseas company or organisation may receive training from a UK based company or organisation in work practices and techniques which are required for the visitor’s employment overseas and not available in their home country.
  2. 24 An employee of an overseas based training company may deliver a short series of training to employees of a UK based company, where the trainer is employed by an overseas business contracted to deliver global training to the international corporate group to which the UK based company belongs.

Study

  1. 25 Visitors may carry out the following study:
    1. (a) educational exchanges or visits with a UK state or independent school; or
    2. (b) a maximum of 30 days study on:
      1. (i) recreational courses (not English language training);
      2. (ii) a short-course (which includes English language training) at an accredited institution;
  2. provided that the main purpose of the visit is not to study.

Medical treatment

  1. 26 An individual may receive private medical treatment provided they meet the additional eligibility requirements at V 4.14 – V 4.16.
  2. 27 An individual may act as an organ donor or be assessed as a potential organ donor to an identified recipient in the United Kingdom, provided they meet the additional eligibility requirements at V 4.17 – V 4.20.

VISITORS APPENDIX 4. PERMITTED PAID ENGAGEMENTS

  1. 1 The following are permitted paid engagements:
    1. (a) an academic who is highly qualified within his or her field of expertise may examine students and/or participate in or chair selection panels, if they have been invited by a UK Higher Education Institution or a UK based research or arts organisation as part of that institution or organisation’s quality assurance processes.
    2. (b) An expert may give lectures in their subject area, if they have been invited by a UK Higher Education Institution; or a UK based research or arts organisation provided this does not amount to filling a teaching position for the host organisation.
    3. (c) An overseas designated pilot examiner may assess UK based pilots to ensure they meet the national aviation regulatory requirements of other countries, if they have been invited by an approved training organisation based in the UK that is regulated by the UK Civil Aviation Authority for that purpose.
    4. (d) A qualified lawyer may provide advocacy for a court or tribunal hearing, arbitration or other form of dispute resolution for legal proceedings within the UK, if they have been invited by a client.
    5. (e) A professional artist, entertainer, musician or sports person may carry out an activity directly relating to their profession, if they have been invited by a creative (arts or entertainment) or sports organisation, agent or broadcaster based in the UK.

VISITORS APPENDIX 5. PERMIT FREE FESTIVALS

  1. 1 An artist, entertainer or musician visiting the UK to perform at one or more of the following permit free festivals may receive payment to do so:
    1. (a) Aberdeen International Youth Festival
    2. (b) Aldeburgh Festival
    3. (c) Barbican Festivals (Only Connect - Nils Frahm’s Marathon, Summer Festival, Autumn 1 – Transcender, Autumn 2 – New York Philharmonic Residency)
    4. (d) Belfast International Arts Festival
    5. (e) Bestival
    6. (f) Billingham International Folklore Festival of World Dance
    7. (g) Boomtown Fair
    8. (h) Breakin’ Convention
    9. (i) Brighton Festival
    10. (j) Brighton Fringe
    11. (k) Brouhaha International Street Festival
    12. (l) Cambridge Folk Festival
    13. (m) Camp Bestival
    14. (n) Celtic Connections
    15. (o) Cheltenham Festivals (Jazz/Science/ Music/Literature)
    16. (p) City of London Festival
    17. (q) Cornwall International Male Voice Choral Festival
    18. (r) DaDa Festival International
    19. (s) Dance Umbrella
    20. (t) Download
    21. (u) Edinburgh Festival Fringe
    22. (v) Edinburgh International Festival
    23. (w) Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival
    24. (x) Glasgow International Jazz Festival
    25. (y) Glastonbury
    26. (z) Glyndebourne
    27. (aa) Greenbelt
    28. (bb) Hay Festival
    29. (cc) Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival
    30. (dd) Latitude
    31. (ee) Leeds Festival
    32. (ff) LIFT
    33. (gg) Llangollen International Musical Eisteddfod
    34. (hh) London Jazz Festival (EFG)
    35. (ii) Norfolk and Norwich Festival
    36. (jj) Reading Festival
    37. (kk) Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo
    38. (ll) Salisbury International Arts Festival
    39. (mm) Snape Festival
    40. (nn) T in the Park
    41. (oo) V Festivals
    42. (pp) Wireless
    43. (qq) WOMAD