Guidance

Export products made from endangered animals: special rules

You must get a certificate to export products made from endangered animals.

Use the Species+ tool to search for the animal that the product is made from. Check which annex (A, B, C or D) it’s classified as under EU wildlife trade regulations.

What you need to do depends on whether you’re exporting within the EU or outside the EU.

If Species+ says the animal is banned, you can’t export the product. There are special rules for ivory, rhino horn and certain other animal products.

Within the EU

If the animal is classed as B, C or D, you don’t need to do anything.

If it’s classed as Annex A, you must apply for an Article 10 certificate unless any of the following apply:

  • your goods are antiques made before 1947
  • you’re giving your goods away
  • you’re using or displaying goods for non-commercial reasons like scientific research or in an educational display

Apply for an Article 10 certificate

Fill in either:

You can use the guidance notes (PDF, 329KB, 9 pages) to help you. If you’re re-exporting a species, include its CITES import permit to prove it legally entered the EU.

Email the completed form to wildlife.licensing@apha.gsi.gov.uk or post it to the APHA Centre for International Trade Bristol.

Include any supporting documents that show you acquired the product legally, for example:

  • a copy of the import permit
  • a previous Article 10 certificate (use the yellow copy)

The certificate costs £31.

You should get your certificate within 15 working days.

Outside the EU

If it’s classed as A, B or C, you need a CITES export permit.

If it’s classed as D, check the animal’s CITES listing in the Species+ tool. If it’s in Appendix III, you’ll need a CITES export permit. Otherwise, you don’t need to do anything.

Apply for a CITES export permit

Fill in either:

You can use the guidance notes (PDF, 154KB, 10 pages) to help you.

Email or post the completed form to the APHA Centre for International Trade Bristol.

A permit costs £63 (or £37 to re-export). You should receive it within 15 working days.

If you regularly travel with musical instruments made from endangered animals (for example ivory piano keys) that you intend to bring back to the UK, you may not need a permit. Contact the APHA Centre for International Trade in Bristol to check.

Ivory, rhino horn and other animal products with special rules

There are special rules for products made with elephant ivory, rhino horn, tigers and their parts and derivatives, bear bile, bear paws and gallbladders, and eggs of native British birds. They can only be exported in special cases like for scientific research, if they’re family heirlooms or valuable artworks.

Check with APHA to find out if you can export these products. You could be fined or imprisoned for up to 7 years if you break the rules.

If you need help

Contact the APHA Centre for International Trade in Bristol if you need any help.

Published 7 November 2016