Foreign travel advice

Morocco

Important COVID-19 travel guidance

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel. Travel to some countries and territories is currently exempted.

This advice is being kept under constant review. Travel disruption is still possible and national control measures may be brought in with little notice, so check our travel guidance.

Safety and security

Political situation

On the 20 March, Morocco entered a State of Health Emergency. Internal movement can be subject to restrictions. See Coronavirus

Protests can occur at short notice across the country and are generally heavily policed. Demonstrations are mostly peaceful but there have been isolated incidents of violence.

You should follow local and international developments in the media and take sensible security precautions. Avoid political gatherings and demonstrations. Always observe instructions given by the local security authorities.

Crime

Incidents of violent crime occasionally occur.

There have been incidents involving the use of knives against tourists in street attacks, thefts and burglaries in the major cities and along beaches, where you should avoid quiet areas and be vigilant at all times, particularly after dark. Don’t carry large amounts of money or valuables around with you.

Petty crime is common, especially in tourist areas like the medina quarter of towns/cities and on beaches. Crimes include pick-pocketing, bag snatching and drive-by motorcycle theft of visible jewellery and handbags. Be vigilant when asking for directions and using ATMs as crime and aggressive begging can occur. Credit card fraud and scams like substituting inferior goods for those that were actually bought are common. You should remain vigilant and alert to potential confidence tricks.

When visiting the medina quarter of a town or city, make sure any guide you use is operating with the agreement of the local tourist authorities, and displays an official badge. Harassment of tourists by people posing as official tourist guides is common.

Women should exercise caution particularly when travelling alone as they could be vulnerable to unwanted attention or harassment by men.

Exercise caution when travelling to Morocco for a relationship initiated via the internet. There have been incidents of marriage fraud and attempted extortion affecting foreign nationals. When travelling for a first visit, make sure you keep your return ticket, passport and personal belongings safe in case problems arise.

Road travel

On the 20 March, Morocco entered a State of Health Emergency and road travel between cities can be subject to restrictions. See Coronavirus

You can drive in Morocco with a valid UK driving licence for up to one year. You can also drive with a valid International Driving Permit for up to one year of your temporary stay in Morocco. From 28 March 2019, you will need to have a 1968 International Driving Permit (IDP) to drive in Morocco. 1949 IDPs previously issued by the UK may no longer be accepted for use in Morocco after this date. From 1 February 2019, you can only get IDPs over the counter from 2,500 UK Post Offices. You will not be able to buy an IDP outside the UK, so get one before you travel.

For any longer periods you need to apply for a Moroccan Driving Licence as per laws and guidelines set by the Moroccan Ministry of Equipment, Transport and Logistics.

If you’re planning to hire a car, check with your car hire company for information on their requirements before you travel.

Morocco has a poor road safety record. In 2018, 3,485 people were killed and approximately 100,000 injured in traffic accidents. The road fatality rate is approximately 9 times higher than in the UK.

Drive carefully, especially in poor weather conditions, on secondary routes and on mountain roads. Driving at night can be particularly hazardous due to poor lighting. Lorries and trucks may be overloaded and you should take extra care around them. It’s common to encounter pedestrians crossing motorways. You should take extra care when overtaking, particularly where there is no hard shoulder. Leave plenty of time to reach your destination and respect speed limits.

If you’re involved in a road accident, you should complete a ‘Constat Amiable’ form, to be signed by both parties. Blank forms are available on arrival at Tangier port from the insurance company booths and from tobacconists in all cities.

If you’re involved in a road accident resulting in a fatality and the Moroccan authorities consider you responsible, you may be detained pending a trial hearing.

If you enter Morocco with a vehicle, the registration number will be recorded. If you’re not in possession of the same vehicle when leaving Morocco, you’ll be refused exit and detained. You’ll need to provide evidence of adequate motor insurance. You should always carry your insurance, licence and registration documents with you.

Public Transport

Public transport may be affected by local restrictions put in place at short notice.

Hiking

If you’re planning to hike on Mount Toubkal or on other mountains in Morocco, seek local advice and take necessary precautions, including safe camp arrangements. Trekking or camping alone can be dangerous, consider joining a group or hiring a registered guide. Crime is also a risk.