Foreign travel advice

Greece

Important COVID-19 travel guidance

The Foreign & Commonwealth Office currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel. Travel to some countries and territories is currently exempted.

This advice is being kept under constant review. Travel disruption is still possible and national control measures may be brought in with little notice, so check our travel guidance.

Summary

From 4 July, Greece is exempt from the FCO advice against all non-essential international travel. This is based on the current assessment of COVID-19 risks.

Travel is subject to entry restrictions

  • If you travel to Greece, you will need to complete a Passenger Locator Form (PLF) at least 24 hours before travel. Failure to do so in advance may result in your carrier not allowing you to travel, a 500 Euro fine on arrival or the Greek authorities not allowing you to enter the country.
  • Every traveller, including children, must have their details included on a PLF. If you’re travelling with others outside of your household, you should all complete your own form. If you’re travelling together as a household, the Greek authorities ask for you to complete one form with all adults and children included. You can add additional members of your household at the top of the form before you submit.
  • Some airlines may require individual PLFs for every traveller over the age of 18 within the same household. You should check directly with your airline what you will need to show in order to be allowed boarding.

See Entry requirements for more information before you plan to travel.

Preparing for your return journey to the UK

If you’re returning to the UK from overseas, you will need to:

Check our advice on foreign travel during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and sign up for email alerts for this travel advice.

If you’re planning travel to Greece, find out what you need to know about coronavirus there in the Coronavirus section.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the FCO’s guidance on foreign travel insurance.

British nationals usually make over 3 million visits to Greece annually. Most visits are trouble-free, but you should take sensible precautions to protect yourself and your belongings. See Crime

In early March large numbers of migrants and refugees gathered at multiple locations along the Greek-Turkish border. Protests, including some violent clashes, broke out, primarily on the Turkish side of the border. There is potential for further unrest on both sides of the border. Avoid crowds and demonstrations and follow instructions from the local authorities. If you are in affected areas, monitor the local media for information.

There were incidents of unrest and violence on the Eastern Aegean islands of Lesvos, Chios and Samos in response to an increase in arrivals of migrants from Turkey in March. It is possible that further incidents may arise. If you’re on these islands, you should remain vigilant, avoid any demonstrations or related large gatherings, keep up to date with developments and follow the advice of the local authorities.

The UK has left the European Union. The rules on travel to EU countries will stay the same until 31 December 2020 while the UK and EU negotiate additional arrangements. This page will be updated with country-specific information for travellers to Greece as things change. Sign up for email alerts and view the latest updates for UK nationals travelling to and living in Europe.

If you’re living in or moving to Greece, visit our Living in Greece guide in addition to this travel advice.

There are regular strikes, sometimes called at short notice that can cause disruption to public transport (including air travel and ports), as well as road networks and borders. You should avoid all demonstrations and follow the advice given by local security authorities. See Strikes and demonstrations

Localised or severe weather extremes, including wildfires, can affect areas of Greece over the extended summer period. See Natural disasters

Terrorist attacks in Greece can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

The Greek police won’t accept rowdy or indecent behaviour, especially where excessive drinking is involved. Greek courts impose heavy fines or prison sentences on people who behave indecently. Your travel insurance may not cover you after drinking. See Local laws and customs

The emergency services number in Greece is 112. Calling 999 from a UK mobile in Greece will automatically transfer you to the Greek emergency services.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.