Safety and security

Crime

Crime levels are generally low, but pickpockets and bag-snatchers operate in crowded areas mainly around Copenhagen.

Be aware that thieves can use a variety of methods to distract you, particularly when getting on and off from crowded public transport. Thieves are also known to operate opportunistically around hotel lobby areas and in cafes and restaurants.

Keep your personal belongings, including passports and money secure. You should also keep an eye on luggage, including in the overhead baggage compartment when travelling on trains to and from the airport.

This kind of crime is more common at the central station, Nørreport Station and on the main shopping street called Strøget and other areas popular with tourists such as Christiania, Nyhavn and Kongens Nytorv. Pickpockets are also known to operate inside Kastrup airport.

You should take extra care in Christiania and Nørrebro, particularly late at night. There have been a number of disturbances in these areas with instances of violence between gangs and minority groups. These have included stabbings and shootings, although they tend to be localised, and often gang related. You should take extra care in these areas, particularly late at night.

Local travel

Public transport is generally of a very high standard. You can buy bus, train and metro tickets at train station kiosks and some supermarkets.

There are outlets across many Danish cities that hire out quality bicycles for a reasonable fee.

Bicycles are widely used in Denmark and cycle lanes are commonplace. Many accidents occur when pedestrians don’t give the right of way to bicycles. Guides on cycling in Denmark have been published in English on the websites of Visit Copenhagen and Cyklistforbundet (Danish Cyclists’ Federation).

Ferries are available to transport you to Denmark’s many islands.

Road travel

Road conditions in Denmark are good and driving standards are fairly high. In 2016 there were 215 road deaths in Denmark (source: Department for Transport). This equates to 3.8 road deaths per 100,000 of the population and compares to the UK average of 2.8 road deaths per 100,000 of population in 2016.

Always wear seatbelts. You must drive with dipped headlights at all times and they should be masked with special European opaque material available from most garages in the UK and Ireland. It is now law in Denmark to indicate before changing lanes on a motorway. You should carry a warning triangle in case of breakdowns.

Driving offences committed in Denmark may be reported to the UK authorities. Sanctions for speeding have become tougher. Those caught driving 100 kmh in a 50 kmh zone or past road works with a 50 kmh restriction may immediately lose their licence.

You must give due consideration to the many cyclists present in Danish cities. Cyclists often have the right of way. It is particularly important that you check cycle lanes before turning right. See the European Commission,AA and RAC guides on driving in Denmark.

Employment

You should check carefully whether any offers of employment for asphalting or seasonal work are genuine, as there have been examples of people being misled.