Corporate report

Health Service Ombudsman and the Local Government Ombudsman report: Care and support provided to a person with Down's syndrome

This document contains the following information: Health Service Ombudsman and the Local Government Ombudsman report: Care and support provided to a person with Down's syndrome.

Documents

A report by the Health Service Ombudsman and the Local Government Ombudsman about the care and support provided to a person with Down's syndrome: thirteenth report of the Health Service Commissioner for England session 2010-12 - Full Text

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This document contains the following information: A report by the Health Service Ombudsman and the Local Government Ombudsman about the care and support provided to a person with Down’s syndrome: thirteenth report of the Health Service Commissioner for England session 2010-12.

This report tells the story of Mr J, who was an active, outgoing and sociable man. He had Down’s syndrome. He lived independently in rented accommodation with his wife. Newcastle City Council, latterly through the Coquet Trust, provided day-to-day support to Mr J and his wife to help maintain their independence.

In 2005, owing to concerns about a significant deterioration in his skills and health, Mr J was admitted to hospital for a five to six week assessment. Mr J remained in hospital for seven months, some five of those after he had been declared ready for discharge.

Mr J was discharged into inappropriate locked accommodation, which he only left following his death 10 months later. Mr J was 53. Mr J’s brother, Mr K, complained about the care provided to Mr J.

This joint investigation with the Local Government Ombudsman found significant failings on the part of both Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust and the Council. They are to compensate, and apologise to, the family. The NHS Trust and the Council will also prepare, share and update progress on an action plan showing what they have done (or will do) to prevent recurrence of their failings.

This paper was laid before Parliament in response to a legislative requirement or as a Return to an Address and was ordered to be printed by the House of Commons.

Published 23 November 2011