Safety and security

Local travel - Syrian border

The FCO advise against all travel to within 10km of the border with Syria. The FCO advise against all but essential travel to the remaining areas of Sirnak, Mardin, Sanlurfa, Gaziantep, Kilis and Hatay provinces. On 20 July, a suicide bomber killed 33 people and injured over 100 others in Suruc, Sanlurfa. On 11 May 2013, 2 car bombs killed 53 people and wounded more than 100 in the town of Reyhanli, Hatay province. In October 2012, 5 Turkish citizens were killed when a shell fell on the town of Akḉakale. Syrian forces continue to target areas close to the Turkish border and there remains a heightened risk of terrorism in the region.

Mortar rounds reportedly fired by ISIL militants in northern Syria landed on the E90 road near Nusaybin in Mardin province, Turkey, on 15 September 2014. There were no casualties. As a result of heavy fighting in northern Syria, there has been a mass influx of refugees into southern Turkey over the past two years.

Local travel – eastern provinces

The FCO advise against all but essential travel to the provinces of Diyarbakir and Tunceli. Since July there has been an intensive period of PKK attacks on Turkish security forces, their premises and vehicles. In some incidents, civilians have been affected.

A temporary Turkish military restricted zone has been imposed for the Mount Ararat area. No permission is being given for parties to enter the area, nor to climb the mountain. Other temporary military restricted zones have been established in eastern provinces. Don’t attempt to enter these zones. There may be some disruption to travel in these areas.


Since Spring 2013, there have been sporadic demonstrations in cities across Turkey, some of which have become violent. In Istanbul previous demonstrations have centered on the area around Taksim Square, on Istiklal Street and in the Besiktas and Kadikoy districts and more recently in Okmeydani. In Ankara, the protests have mainly taken place in the central Kizilay district around the Prime Minister’s office. In Izmir the focus has been in the town centre, near the water front.

Since July, demonstrations have occurred in cities across Turkey, including large demonstrations in Adana and Mersin in September, associated with renewed hostilities between the PKK and Turkish security forces in south-east Turkey. A number of these protests have turned violent.

You should avoid all demonstrations and leave the area if one develops. Police have used tear gas and water cannon extensively to disperse protests. The effects of tear gas can be felt several hundred metres beyond the immediate site of demonstrations. Local transport routes may be disrupted.


Generally crime levels are low, but street robbery and pick-pocketing are common in the major tourist areas of Istanbul. You should maintain at least the same level of personal security awareness as in the UK. Alcohol and drugs can make you less alert, less in control and less aware of your environment. If you are going to drink, know your limit. Drinks served in bars overseas are often stronger than those in the UK. Buy your own drinks and keep sight of them at all times so they are not spiked. Be wary of strangers approaching you offering food and drink (which may be drugged), to change money or to take you to a restaurant or nightclub.

Passports have been stolen from rented villas, even when they have been kept in the villa safe. This is a particular problem in Didim, Kas, Kalkan and the Fethiye/Hisaronu/Ovacik area.

In 2014, 14 cases of sexual assault, including rape, were reported to British consular staff in Turkey. Most of these cases occurred during the summer holiday period in coastal tourist areas. Most were committed late at night by someone the victim met during the evening. There have also been sexual attacks on minors visiting toilet facilities alone. You should be extra vigilant in these situations.

Never accept lifts from strangers. Find a registered yellow taxi and make a note of the registration number before getting in.

Very rarely counterfeit alcohol has been responsible for the death of some tourists. If you have any concerns, seek advice from your tour operator or the Turkish authorities.

Road travel

Take care when travelling by road throughout Turkey, particularly at night. Approach roadblocks slowly and follow the instructions of security personnel. Roads between the major cities are generally in excellent condition, but can be poor in remote, rural areas. Accidents are common and mainly due to poor or reckless driving. According to the Turkish police, there were 1,207,354 road traffic accidents in 2013 which resulted in 3,685 deaths and 274,829 injuries.

If you drive in Turkey, you must have either an International Driving Permit or a notarised copy (in Turkish) of your UK driving licence. Provisional driving licences are not recognised.

You will need an ‘A’ category standard motorcycle licence to hire a motorcycle over 50cc in Turkey. An ‘A1’ category ‘light motorcycle’ driving licence is only suitable for motorcycles below 50cc. By law you must wear a helmet. Failure to do so could result in a heavy fine.

Don’t drink and drive. The police will breathalyse drunk drivers, fine you on the spot and immediately confiscate your licence for 6 months.

Extreme sports

If you participate in extreme sports (including paragliding, parasailing, white-water rafting, off-road driving and hot air ballooning), satisfy yourself that adequate safety precautions are in place. Only use reputable operators and insist on training before use. Make sure your travel insurance covers you for all the activities you want to undertake. British nationals have been injured and in some cases killed participating in extreme sports.

Stray dogs

Most towns and cities have stray dogs. Local authorities take action to control and manage numbers but packs congregate in parks and wastelands and can be aggressive. Take care, remain calm, and avoid approaching stray dogs. If you’re bitten, seek medical advice as rabies and other animal borne diseases are present in Turkey.