Summary

On 21 August 2018 Trinidad and Tobago experienced an earthquake in excess of magnitude 6.7. Initial reports indicate damage to some buildings and communication networks. If you’re in the area you should monitor local media, exercise caution and follow the advice of the local authorities. Aftershocks in the same area are possible.

Over 30,000 British nationals visit Trinidad and Tobago every year. Most visits are trouble-free.

There are high levels of violent crime in Trinidad, including murder, especially in parts of the capital Port of Spain. See Crime

Terrorists are very likely to try to carry out attacks in Trinidad and Tobago. Attacks could be indiscriminate, including in crowded spaces and places visited by foreigners. See Terrorism

There is a risk of mosquito-borne illnesses in Trinidad and Tobago from dengue and chikungunya fever. You should take steps to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes. See Health

UK health authorities have classified Trinidad and Tobago as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For information and advice about the risks associated with Zika virus, visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

Trinidad and Tobago is rarely affected by hurricanes, but severe tropical storms can occur, which can result in localised flooding and landslides. See Hurricanes

You can contact the emergency services by calling 999 (police), 811 (ambulance) or 990 (fire).

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before you travel.