Foreign travel advice

Slovenia

Important Coronavirus (COVID-19) travel

It is illegal to travel abroad from the UK for holidays. Follow current COVID-19 rules where you live: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

In England, you must have a permitted reason to travel abroad and complete the declaration form.

Some countries have closed borders, and any country may further restrict travel or bring in new social distancing rules with little warning. Check our advice for each country you will visit or transit through.

When you return, follow the rules to enter the UK from abroad (except from Ireland).

Summary

The FCDO advises against all but essential travel to:

  • the whole of Slovenia based on the current assessment of COVID-19 risks.

If you are returning to the UK from Slovenia, you will need to self-isolate on your return (unless you are exempt). Check the latest guidance for England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.The FCDO is not advising you to cut short your visit. You should contact your tour operator or airline if you have any questions about your return journey.

Travel to Slovenia is subject to entry restrictions

The Slovenian authorities have implemented a Red list to determine the requirements for people arriving into Slovenia. If you are arriving into Slovenia from a country on the Red list, you will have to quarantine for 10 days, unless you meet certain criteria. As of 26 October 2020, all of the UK is on the Red list. This means that all arrivals to Slovenia from the UK must quarantine for 10 days, unless they meet one of the criteria or exemptions listed in the Entry requirements section.

If your travel is deemed by the Slovenian authorities to be non-essential, then you may be denied entry by the Slovenian authorities.

See Entry requirements for more information before you plan to travel.

Preparing for your return journey to the UK

If you’re returning to the UK from overseas, you will need to:

If your return journey to the UK transits another country, you should check whether it is subject to a travel ban or any other additional requirements. If so, contact your travel provider.

Check our advice on foreign travel during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and sign up for email alerts for this travel advice.

If you’re planning to travel to Slovenia, find out what you need to know about coronavirus there in the Coronavirus section.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the FCDO’s guidance on foreign travel insurance.

For information about COVID-19 vaccines, see the Coronavirus page.

There are rules about taking food and drink into the EU. See Taking food and drink into the EU for further information.

Around 160,000 British nationals visit Slovenia every year. Most visits are trouble free.

If you’re living in or moving to Slovenia, read the Living in Slovenia guide in addition to this travel advice.

Immigration controls may temporarily be in place at some road and rail border crossing points. Full immigration controls are in place at Slovenia’s border with Croatia. You must carry your passport with you at all times. You should monitor local media and check with your transport provider, the Slovenian Automobile Association (AMZS) or Slovenian Railways websites for updates.

All foreign nationals visiting Slovenia must register with the police within 3 days of arrival or risk paying a fine. Hotels and accommodation providers will usually do this as part of the check in procedures. See Local laws and customs

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Slovenia, attacks can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

To drive on Slovenian motorways, you must buy and display a ‘vignette’. Vehicles over 3.5 tonnes must register for an electronic tolling system. Vehicles must be fitted with winter equipment from 15 November to 15 March. See Road travel

Seek advice on weather and safety conditions before travelling into the mountains. Off-piste skiing is highly dangerous due to the risk of avalanches. See Skiing/mountaineering

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.