Foreign travel advice

Iceland

Important COVID-19 travel guidance

The Foreign & Commonwealth Office currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel. Travel to some countries and territories is currently exempted.

This advice is being kept under constant review. Travel disruption is still possible and national control measures may be brought in with little notice, so check our travel guidance.

Local laws and customs

Don’t become involved with drugs of any kind. Possession of even small quantities or soft drugs can lead to heavy fines and/or imprisonment. Using or importing khat/qat is prohibited in Iceland.

Smoking in restaurants, bars, public transport and public buildings is prohibited. Anyone caught smoking will be asked to leave the premises and may be fined.

You don’t have to carry your passport with you, but it is sensible to keep some form of ID on you. The British Embassy in Reykjavik deals with a significant - and increasing - number of lost passports by British citizens each year. You should keep your passport somewhere safe at all times and make sure next of kin details are entered into the back of your passport.

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people enjoy progressive rights in Iceland. Same-sex marriage has been legal since 2010 and same-sex couples have had equal access to adoption and IVF treatment since 2006. Reykjavík has a visible gay scene, with at least one gay bar in the downtown area. See our information and advice page for the LGBT community before you travel.

Whale products are available in Iceland but tourists should be aware that its importation into the UK or EU is illegal under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. Any importation of whale products to the UK will result in seizure of the goods, possibly a fine of up to £5,000 and/or a custodial sentence.