Foreign travel advice

Iceland

Important COVID-19 Travel

Under current UK COVID-19 restrictions, you must stay at home. It is illegal to travel abroad for holidays or leisure purposes. Check the rules in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Do not travel unless you have a legally permitted reason to do so. In England, from 8 March you must complete a declaration form for international travel (except for travel to Ireland).

Check our advice for all the countries you will visit or transit through. Some countries have closed borders, and any country may further restrict travel or bring in new rules with little warning.

To enter or return to the UK from abroad (except from Ireland), you must follow all the rules for entering the UK. These include providing your journey and contact details, and evidence of a negative COVID-19 test before you travel. When you arrive, you must quarantine and take additional COVID-19 tests. This will take place in a managed quarantine hotel if you enter England from a red list travel ban country, or enter Scotland.

Summary

If you are arriving in the UK from Iceland on or after 4am on 18 January you will need to self-isolate on your arrival, unless you have a valid exemption. Check the latest guidance for England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.

Travel to Iceland is subject to entry restrictions

  • Due to COVID-19 restrictions, from 1 January all non-essential travel by British citizens from the UK/other non EU/EEA country to Iceland is not permitted, unless you are resident in Iceland or fall under their exempt category of traveller
  • Most passengers flying into Iceland must present a negative PCR taken within 72 hours of their time of departure to Iceland. Followed by two COVID-19 tests, one on arrival and another 5-6 days later. Children born in 2005 or later are exempt from testing but will be required to self-isolate along with their parents or guardians on arrival.

See Entry requirements for more information before you plan to travel.

Preparing for your return journey to the UK

If you’re returning to the UK from overseas, you will need to:

If your return journey to the UK transits another country, you should check whether it is subject to a travel ban or any other additional requirements. If so, contact your travel provider.

Check our advice on foreign travel during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and sign up for email alerts for this travel advice.

If you’re planning travel to Iceland, find out what you need to know about coronavirus there in the Coronavirus section.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the FCDO’s guidance on foreign travel insurance.

For information about COVID-19 vaccines, see the Coronavirus page.

Approximately 298,000 British nationals visited Iceland through Keflavik airport in 2018. Most visits are trouble-free.

If you’re living in or moving to Iceland, read the Living in Iceland guide in addition to this travel advice.

Iceland is volcanically and seismically active. You should monitor the Icelandic Met Office website for the latest updates and follow the advice of the local authorities. In case of an emergency, the Department of Civil Protection and Emergency Management in Iceland will send out text messages to anyone located in the vicinity. See Natural disasters

Weather conditions can also be severe and change rapidly. In order to receive the latest updates and alerts, you should monitor the Safe Travel website, Icelandic Road and Coastal Administration website and Icelandic Met Office reports.

If you need to contact the emergency services, call 112.

If you’re travelling around Iceland, download the 112 Iceland app and leave your travel plans with Safe Travel in case you need assistance from the Icelandic emergency services. Keep mobile phones switched on and always follow the advice of the local authorities.

Terrorist attacks in Iceland can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.