Foreign travel advice

Brazil

Important COVID-19: travel is different

To understand the risks in a country, including the latest COVID restrictions (including for entry), follow FCDO Travel Advice.

To prevent new COVID variants from entering the UK, you should not travel to red list countries.

Check what you need to do to travel abroad and return to England, or read travel guidance for Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

Summary

The FCDO advises against all but essential travel to the whole of Brazil based on the current assessment of COVID-19 risks.

COVID-19 entry restrictions for Brazil

Before you travel, check the ‘Entry requirements’ section for Brazil’s current entry restrictions and requirements. These may change with little warning. Monitor this advice for the latest updates and stay in contact with your travel provider.

Preparing for your return journey to the UK

Brazil is on the red list for entering England. Check what you must do to enter England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

If you’re planning travel to Brazil, find out what you need to know about coronavirus there in the Coronavirus section.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the FCDO’s guidance on foreign travel insurance.

For information about COVID-19 vaccines, see the Coronavirus page.

For guidance on how to stay safely in Brazil as a visitor if you are unable to return to the UK, see Coronavirus

Although non-resident foreign nationals are not permitted to enter by air and the Brazilian government is maintaining series of bans on entry by land and sea, there are a few exceptions, including spouses, parents and guardians of Brazilian nationals as well as passengers in transit and aircrew. See Entry requirements

The British diplomatic missions in Brazil are only open for essential business. If you have an urgent consular issue – such as a request for an Emergency Travel Document – you will need to pre-book an appointment online. We are not able to respond to British nationals who visit without a pre-booked appointment.

154,586 British nationals visited Brazil in 2018. Despite high crime levels, most visits are trouble free.

Levels of crime including violent crime are high, particularly in major cities. . You are likely to see a heavy police presence on the streets, particularly in Rio de Janeiro. Bank card fraud including credit card cloning is common. See Crime

The FCDO advise against all travel within 40km of the Venezuela-Brazil border on the Venezuelan side of the border. See FCDO travel advice for Venezuela

Terrorist attacks in Brazil can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

If you’re a single parent or guardian travelling with a child, you may need additional documentation. This applies if one parent is Brazilian, even if your child only holds a British passport. See Entry requirements

Drug trafficking is widespread in Brazil and incurs severe penalties. See Local laws and customs

You should take steps to avoid mosquito bites. UK health authorities have classified Brazil as having a risk of Zika virus transmission and chikungunya, yellow fever and dengue are present. For more information and advice, visit the website of the National Travel Health Network and Centre and check the recommendations for vaccination. See Health

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.

The Money Advice Service can help you to consider the type of insurance you need. It is a free and independent service set up by government.