Foreign travel advice

Brazil

Important COVID-19 travel guidance

The Foreign & Commonwealth Office currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel. Travel to some countries and territories is currently exempted.

This advice is being kept under constant review. Travel disruption is still possible and national control measures may be brought in with little notice, so check our travel guidance.

Entry requirements

The information on this page covers the most common types of travel and reflects the UK government’s understanding of the rules currently in place. Unless otherwise stated, this information is for travellers using a full ‘British Citizen’ passport.

The authorities in the country or territory you’re travelling to are responsible for setting and enforcing the rules for entry. If you’re unclear about any aspect of the entry requirements, or you need further reassurance, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

You should also consider checking with your transport provider or travel company to make sure your passport and other travel documents meet their requirements.

Entry rules in response to coronavirus

Entry to Brazil

Entry by air

Non-resident foreign nationals are allowed to enter Brazil by air, except at airports in the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Paraiba, Rondonia, Rio Grande do Sul and Tocantins. This is subject to regular entry requirements. Short term travellers staying up to 90 days in Brazil will need to present the airline company proof of travel insurance with complete coverage for the duration of their stay.

Entry by land

Brazil has closed its land borders, except to Brazilian citizens, resident foreign nationals and foreign spouses, children, parents or guardians of a Brazilian national.

Transiting: If you’re in a bordering country and need to cross the land border to board a flight back to your country of residence, you should get in touch with the British Embassy or Consular. You will be permitted to enter Brazil with authorisation from the Federal Police following an official request from the Embassy and on presentation of flight tickets. You should travel straight to the airport once in Brazil.

Sea ports

The Brazilian government has also imposed a ban on foreigners disembarking in any port or other maritime location on Brazilian territory regardless of their nationality. The restriction does not apply to resident foreigners and foreign spouses, children, parents or custodians of a Brazilian national.

Disembarking will only be permitted when medical assistance is required or to catch a connecting flight back to the country of residence.

Transiting Brazil

Passengers are allowed to freely transit as long as they do not leave the international airport area and have a ticket for onward travel. If you intend to transit by land, please read Entry by land.

Visas

Maximum length of stay deadlines, including for tourists, have been temporarily suspended. Any time spent in Brazil after 16 March 2020 will not count towards your maximum permitted length of stay so you will not incur a fine for overstaying.

Regular entry requirements

Visas

British nationals can normally enter Brazil without a visa as a tourist. For further information about visas, see the website of the Brazilian Consulate in London.

Make sure you comply with Brazilian immigration laws on arrival in the country. You must satisfy the Federal Police (the Brazilian immigration authority) of your intended purpose of visit. You will need to be able to demonstrate that you have enough money for the duration of your stay, and provide details of your accommodation and evidence of return or onward travel. Make sure your passport is stamped. If it is not, you may be fined on departure.

If you wish to extend your stay while in Brazil, you should apply to the Federal Police for an extension. If you overstay your visa, you are likely to be given notice to leave the country at your own expense and you may be fined or deported.

Passport validity

Your passport should be valid for a minimum period of 6 months from the date of entry into Brazil.

Dual nationality

The Brazilian immigration authorities often require dual British/Brazilian nationals visiting Brazil to travel on Brazilian (rather than British) passports.  

Travelling with children

There are additional requirements for British-Brazilian dual nationals under 18 entering or transiting through Brazil without their parents or legal guardian, or travelling with one parent only. These requirements don’t usually apply to foreign nationals, but as a precaution and to avoid any possible delays, British nationals under 18 entering or transiting through Brazil without their parents or legal guardian, or travelling with one parent only, are advised to bring a letter of authorisation to travel from any parent(s) not travelling. This applies particularly to children with a Brazilian parent, even if the child only holds a British passport. Contact the Brazilian Consulate in London for more information and advice.

Yellow fever certificate requirements

Check whether you need a yellow fever certificate by visiting the National Travel Health Network and Centre’s TravelHealthPro website.

UK Emergency Travel Documents

UK Emergency travel documents (ETDs) are accepted for entry, airside transit and exit from Brazil. Your ETD must be valid for a minimum period of 6 months from the date of entry into Brazil.