Foreign travel advice

Bolivia

Summary

Cases of locally transmitted Zika virus have been confirmed in the last 3 months. You should follow the advice of the National Travel Health Network and Centre and discuss your travel plans with your healthcare provider, particularly if you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant.

Social conflict is common in Bolivia and blockades may occur along the main roads. Public transport can be disrupted at very short notice and strikes may result in widespread road blockades, including on roads to and from airports. You should never try to cross a blockade. See Road travel and Road blockades. You should avoid large crowds and demonstrations.

Road blockades between major cities were lifted on 26 August but could be reimposed at short notice. Check local travel advice before travelling by road, and do not attempt to cross a blockade.

There is a risk of ‘express kidnappings’. Take care when travelling around Bolivia, particularly when you first arrive. If you take a taxi, use a registered company. See Crime

18,300 British nationals visited Bolivia in 2015. Most visits are trouble free.

There is a low threat from terrorism. See Terrorism

Carry a photocopy of your passport, including the personal details, entry stamp and disembarkation card with you at all times in case it is requested by immigration officials or the police. See Local Laws and Customs

Parts of Bolivia, including La Paz are at high altitude. See Health

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before you travel.