Guidance

Controlled drugs and precursor chemicals: licence fees

Controlled drugs and precursor chemicals licensing fees information for individuals and companies.

Controlled drug domestic licences: application fees for new controlled drug domestic licences

Licensable activity Application fee
Possess controlled drugs £3,133
Supply, or offer to supply, controlled drugs £3,655
Produce preparations containing controlled drugs £4,178
Produce controlled drugs £4,700
Cultivate cannabis with THC content not exceeding 0.2% (for fibre and seed use only of EU approved seed varieties £580
Cultivate cannabis (all other cultivation types) £4,700

Renewal of an existing controlled drug domestic licence of any type

Compliance visits Licence renewal fee
No visit required £326
Visit required £1,371

Precursor chemical domestic licences: application fees for new precursor chemical domestic licences

Licensable activity/activities Licence application fee
Category 1 licence £3,655
Category 2 registration £435
Category 3 registration £435

Renewal/replacement of an existing precursor chemical domestic licence of any type

Visit is required/not required Licence renewal fee
Category 1 licence, where no compliance visit is required £326
Category 1 licence, where a compliance visit is necessary £1,371
Category 2 or category 3 registration, where no compliance visit is required £109
Category 2 or category 3 registration, where a compliance visit is necessary £1,153

Import or export drug licences

Licence type Application fee
Single consignment export licence £24
Single consignment import licence £24

Replacement of a lost, defaced or damaged licence

Lost, defaced or damaged £45

How to pay licence fees

Usually all fees are invoiced for domestic controlled drugs and precursor chemicals licences once a decision has been made on an application. Licences will not be issued until full payment is received and without a licence you have no authority to handle controlled substances. All licence invoices are emailed to the invoicing contact on the application form.

Occasionally, you may be asked to pay in full when we receive your application, and this payment may be required before your application is considered further. If this is applies to your application, you will be informed by email as soon as possible. If you want to withdraw your application at this stage, you will not be charged.

If we refuse your licence application, any fees already paid will be refunded.

All fees for import and export controlled drug licences are invoiced in arrears at the end of the month. If fee invoices for import-export licences are not promptly settled we will not process further import-export licence applications until all outstanding invoices are paid.

If your organisation or company requires a purchase order (PO) number, please ensure that you quote this when you submit your application or when the invoice is raised. PO numbers can also be emailed to: dflu.fees@homeoffice.gov.uk.

You can pay by:

  • Bankers Automated Clearing Service (BACS)
  • Clearing House Automated Payment System (CHAPS)
  • cheque
  • credit or debit card by calling Shared Service Connected Limited on 08450 100 125
  • payment online at: Pay Home Office. This service will allow you to pay the Home Office by credit / debit card, Apple Pay or Google Pay. You will need to quote your Invoice number (found on your invoice and beginning with IE, DLCD or DLPC).

When paying, make sure your invoice number is included, either on the cheque or in the reference section of your bank transfer. Payments made without the correct reference may delay or prevent your payment being allocated correctly. This could lead to you being contacted again to request payment or a delay to the issue of your licence.

Please send any remittance advice to:

Shared Service Connected Limited HO Box 5003 Newport NP20 9BB

Contact details

Licensing fees

Email dflu.fees@homeoffice.gov.uk

or call 020 7035 8972

This address deals with fees, invoices and billing queries for drugs licensing, domestic and import/export.

Published 16 August 2019