Summary

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The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advise against all travel to within 80 km (50 miles) of the Colombian border and 40 km (25 miles) of the Brazilian border. Drug traffickers and illegal armed groups are active along the border area with Colombia and Brazil and there is a risk of kidnapping. See Crime

The FCO advise against all but essential travel to the remaining areas of Venezuela, due to ongoing crime and instability. If you’re in Venezuela, you should keep your departure options under review. If the political situation worsens, the British embassy may be limited in the assistance that it can provide.

You should remain vigilant and informed. Avoid protests and demonstrations, which can turn violent with little warning. During and ahead of demonstrations, there’s often travel disruption as a result of road closures. The authorities often use tear gas and buckshot/plastic pellets to disperse protests. In case of renewed prolonged protests, you should take precautions by securing several days’ worth of food and water provisions. See Political situation

Consular support is not available in parts of Venezuela. We cannot provide any support in the areas where we advise against all travel and our support is limited in other parts of the country.

You should take particular care to check the local situation ahead of any travel to Canaima National Park and the Gran Sabana area of Bolívar State. Recent protests by locals have led to the closure (sometimes for days) of Canaima airport and main roads (eg parts of Road 10 between El Callao and the Brazilian border); and there are particular shortages of fuel and other essentials in the area.

The Venezuelan government has ordered the temporary closure of the border with Colombia (open to foot traffic only). Contact your tour operator before you travel for more information.

There’s a high threat from violent crime and kidnapping throughout Venezuela. Take care at all times, including when arriving in the country. During 2017 there were major, unpredictable outbursts of violence in several cities, including Caracas, Barquisimeto, Valencia, Maracay and Ciudad Guayana. Smaller incidents (including looting) have occurred in 2018. Law enforcement presence in these cities is low and incidents of violent crime are on the rise. Criminality and security incident rates rise sharply during December. Increase your vigilance and remain alert at all times See Crime

Power cuts are common and you may find yourself without water or electricity from short to extended periods of time. See Electricity and Water

There are intermittent shortages of fuel for cars throughout Venezuela, including in Caracas. See Road travel

Banknote shortages have led to increased pressure on Venezuela’s card payment processing infrastructure. Debit or credit card transactions may take longer than expected, or require several attempts.

There have been recent reports of bribes being solicited by authorities at Maiquetia (Caracas) International Airport. See Air travel

UK health authorities have classified Venezuela as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For information and advice about the risks associated with Zika virus, visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

Terrorist attacks in Venezuela can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before you travel.