Summary

The Foreign and Commonwealth Office advise against all but essential travel to Vanuatu.

A state of emergency has been declared in the aftermath of Tropical Cyclone Pam. An informal curfew is in place between the hours of 6pm to 6am. Initial reports suggest extensive and widespread damage to buildings and infrastructure across the country including the capital, Port Vila, where an estimated 90% of buildings have been destroyed or damaged. If you choose to remain in Vanuatu you should follow the instructions of the local authorities.

There are water and power shortages and communications outside Efate are limited. Food supplies have also been affected.

Water borne diseases are reported to be increasing. See Health

There are flight disruptions, although a limited number of commercial flights are now operating. Many hotels have suffered damage. Check for updates with your airline or travel company. If you’re in Vanuatu and need emergency assistance you should contact the New Zealand High Commission in Port Vila.

Cyclone season in Vanuatu is from November to April. Throughout this period there’s a high risk of strong winds and heavy rains with associated flooding, landslides and road closures. See Tropical cyclones

There is no British diplomatic mission in Vanuatu. The British High Commission in Honiara, Solomon Islands provides consular assistance for British nationals in Vanuatu. In an emergency the New Zealand High Commission in Port Vilamay also be able to help.

Vanuatu lies on the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’ and regularly experiences seismic and volcanic activity, with over 2,000 seismic events reported each year. See Earthquakes

There is a low threat from terrorism. See Terrorism

Cyclone season in Vanuatu is from November to April. Throughout this period there is a high risk of strong winds and heavy rains with associated flooding, landslides and road closures. See Tropical Cyclones

Take out comprehensive travel and medical insurance before you travel.