Foreign travel advice

Solomon Islands

Important COVID-19 travel guidance

The Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel. Travel to some countries and territories is currently exempted.

This advice is being kept under constant review. Travel disruption is still possible and national control measures may be brought in with little notice, so check our travel guidance.

Summary

Travel to Solomon Islands is subject to entry restrictions

  • Entry into Solomon Islands is extremely restricted.
  • Effective 10 June new arrangements are in place for passengers arriving into Solomon Islands on the (very) limited number of Solomon Airlines charter flights

See Entry requirements for more information before you plan to travel.

Return travel to the UK is subject to self-isolation requirements

If you’re returning to the UK, you will need to:

  • provide your journey and contact details
  • self-isolate for 14 days

Check the guidance on entering or returning to the UK.

Check our advice on foreign travel during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and sign up for email alerts for this travel advice.

If you’re planning travel to Solomon Islands, find out what you need to know about coronavirus there in the Coronavirus section.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the FCDO’s guidance on foreign travel insurance.

As of 21 March, most non-essential staff and dependents in the British High Commission Honiara have been relocated to Australia, where they continue to deliver critical work including consular assistance, and remotely supporting core staff in Honiara.

Mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue fever are wide-spread across Solomon Islands. You should follow the advice of local authorities, the National Travel Health Network and Centre, and avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

UK health authorities have classified Solomon Islands as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For information and advice about the risks associated with Zika virus, visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

Earthquakes are common in Solomon Islands. To learn more about what to do before, during and after an earthquake, see the New Zealand government’s GetReadyGetThru website. If a major earthquake or landslide occurs close to shore, you should follow the instructions of local authorities, bearing in mind that a tsunami could arrive within minutes.

The tropical cyclone season normally runs from November to May. You should monitor local and international weather updates and follow the advice of the local authorities. See Natural disasters

Most visits to Solomon Islands are trouble free.

The Royal Solomon Islands Police Force has limited resources and response times to calls for help can be slow. There have been reports of robberies involving violence, handbag snatching, pick-pocketing, distraction thefts and harassment, particularly around the central market in Honiara.

Fresh and salt water crocodiles and sharks are common. Large crocodiles have been seen offshore at beaches near Honiara. See Dangerous wildlife

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in the Solomon Islands, attacks can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

Medical facilities are very basic throughout Solomon Islands, including in Honiara. Contact local health providers for further advice. See Health

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.