Foreign travel advice

Peru

Important COVID-19 travel guidance

The Foreign & Commonwealth Office currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel. Travel to some countries and territories is currently exempted.

This advice is being kept under constant review. Travel disruption is still possible and national control measures may be brought in with little notice, so check our travel guidance.

Summary

Travel to Peru is subject to entry restrictions

  • Entry to Peru is prohibited except for Peruvian nationals repatriated to Peru
  • If you’re eligible to enter Peru, you will need to self-isolate for 14 days

See Entry requirements for more information before you plan to travel.

Return travel to the UK is subject to self-isolation requirements

If you’re returning to the UK, you will need to:

  • provide your journey and contact details
  • self-isolate for 14 days

Check the guidance on entering or returning to the UK.

Check our advice on foreign travel during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and sign up for email alerts for this travel advice.

If you’re planning travel to Peru, find out what you need to know about coronavirus there in the Coronavirus section.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the FCO’s guidance on foreign travel insurance.

Around 70,000 British nationals visit Peru every year. Most visits are trouble free.

If you enter Peru without an entry stamp, you’re required by law to apply for a new entry stamp at the nearest immigration office. See Entry requirements

The rainy season in Peru runs from November to April. It can rain and snow heavily in the Andes and there have been occasions of torrential rains in some parts of the country. See Natural disasters

Demonstrations are common in Peru and can turn violent quickly. See Local travel

If you are in Peru or planning to travel, monitor local news closely and follow the authorities’ advice. For specific advice on conditions in the different regions of Peru, in English or Spanish, visit the Iperu website (the official source of information for tourists in Peru) or call them on +511 574 8000 (option 2 for English).

Drug trafficking is a serious crime and drug smugglers face long terms of imprisonment. See Local laws and customs

There may be a higher risk to your safety in areas where there is organised crime and terrorism linked to the production of drugs. See Local travel

There are risks involved in flying over the Nazca Lines. See Nazca Lines

There’s risk of robbery by bogus taxi drivers, especially to and from the airports and at bus terminals. See Crime

Driving standards are poor. Crashes resulting in death and injury occur frequently. See Road travel

Terrorist attacks in Peru can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

UK health authorities have classified Peru as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For information and advice about the risks associated with Zika virus, visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.