Guidance

School inspection data summary report (IDSR) guide

This guide provides an overview of the inspection data summary report (IDSR) for primary and secondary schools, including schools with a sixth form and gives guidance on interpreting the data.

Applies to England

Overview of the Ofsted IDSR

This guide is for primary and secondary schools, including those with a sixth form.

The IDSR is a web-based page for Ofsted inspectors to use when preparing for and during inspection. It is intended as a tool for inspectors, which summarises and analyses available data about that school to support the inspection. The IDSR is also designed to align with our school inspection handbook, to inform inspection conversations. It is not intended to be an exhaustive profile of the school or to, in itself, provide any judgement or assessment of a school.

The IDSR can contain sensitive information about schools and colleges. It is your responsibility to ensure that the IDSR is stored and shared appropriately. Please see our IDSR conditions of use and storage statement.

For phonics, key stage 1 and key stage 2 data, the standards have been kept consistent between 2022 and 2023 data; therefore, it is possible to compare data across these years. However, the IDSR will not directly compare data across years. For key stage 4 and 16 to 18, due to a different grading approach in 2022, it is not possible to make direct comparisons between 2022 and 2023. As with primary data, the IDSR does not make direct comparisons across years. Instead, the IDSR contains arrows that indicate whether the school value compared with the national value each year has changed. There are further details about how the arrows are calculated later in this document.

Anonymised IDSRs

These anonymised IDSRs are examples for a primary school and a secondary school with a sixth form:

IDSR reports are dynamically generated based on school data and can differ from school to school.

Access your school’s Ofsted IDSR

As a web page through our website

You can access it directly through our new Ofsted IDSR service or from the Department for Education (DfE)’s Analyse School Performance (ASP) service. You will need a DfE Sign-in account and associated permissions for the school(s). We recommend that users with more than 1 school use our direct link.

Ofsted can’t give or take away access or add schools within DfE Sign-in. But the approver for your school/organisation will be able to help. To find out your approver, please login to your DfE Sign-in account and click on the ‘Services’ tab. Then click on ‘See approvers at an organisation’.

Sign-in: IDSR service

Download and use offline

If you want to use the IDSR offline, you have several options.

Option 1 – click the ‘download this page’ button located at the top of the web page. This will download the HTML page automatically to your downloads folder. You do not need an internet connection to view and share it.

Option 2 – click the ‘print this page’ button. This will take you to the print configuration page where you can print as a hard copy document.

Option 3 – click the ‘print this page’ button. This will take you to the print configuration page where under printer you can select ‘save as PDF’. This will convert the page into a PDF which can then be saved and shared. (Please note that this is reliant on you having the correct up-to-date software. Older versions may not support this functionality.)

Ofsted IDSR 2023

As outlined in the school inspection handbook, inspectors will gather evidence of the impact of the quality of education from various sources. This includes nationally generated performance information about pupils’ progress and attainment. The IDSR can only provide a starting point, however. Inspectors want to see first-hand the quality of education as experienced by pupils and understand how well leaders know what it is like to be a pupil at the school.

The Ofsted IDSR has been designed to:

  • reduce the time spent preparing for an inspection

  • provide interpretation of the data for inspectors

  • minimise the focus on small groups that distract the conversation away from meeting the needs of all pupils

Where applicable, the Ofsted IDSR contains:

  • School characteristics – based on 2023, 2022 and 2021 data

  • Ethnicity – based on 2023 data

  • Prior attainment – based on 2023 prior data

  • SEND characteristics – based on 2023 data

  • Staffing – based on 2022, 2021 and 2020 data

  • Links to alternative provision and other providers – based on 2023 data

  • Absence – based on 2022/23 (2 term) and 2021/22 data

  • Suspensions and permanent exclusions – based on 2021/22, 2020/21 and 2019/20 data

  • Pupil movement – based on movement between Jan 2022 and Jan 2023 census, Jan 2021 and Jan 2022 census

  • Progress and attainment at key stages 1 and 2 – based on 2023 data

  • Subject entries at key stage 4 – based on 2023, 2022 and 2021 data

  • Progress and attainment at key stage 4 – based on 2023, 2022 and 2019 data

  • Destinations at key stage 4 – based on 2020/21, 2019/20 and 2018/19

  • 16 to 18 qualification types – based on 2023, 2022 and 2019 data

  • 16 to 18 retention – based on 2022 and 2019 data

  • Subject entries at 16 to 18 – based on 2023, 2022 and 2021 data

  • Attainment at 16 to 18 – based on 2023, 2022 and 2019 data

  • Destinations 16 to 18 – based on 2020/21, 2019/20 and 2018/19

  • Pupil groups data – based on 2023 (primary), 2023 (secondary) and 2022/23 (2 term absence)

Reporting data issues

The data in the IDSR is largely provided by the Department for Education (DfE). If your query relates to issues with values displayed, such as Progress 8 score or cohort, have you checked if the IDSR matches data presented in the ‘Analyse School Performance and ‘Compare School and College Performance in England’ sites? If the IDSR data matches what has been published, then please contact DfE. If your query relates to bespoke calculations only used in the IDSR, for example percentile ranks, please email the IDSR team and we will aim to respond as soon as possible. 

If applicable, the Ofsted IDSR service will provide a link to a predecessor or successor provider to view. Some providers with a predecessor will not have a link. This is because we decided not to include predecessors where there was no data on the predecessor school.

School details

The school details information at the beginning of the report comes from the DfE’s ‘Get information about schools (GIAS)’ service. This data is correct as of the release date on the IDSR.

Report information

The Ofsted IDSR will always show which release of performance data the report is based on. It will also show the date that the report was last released.

For example:

Release information: Provisional 2023 Phonics, Provisional 2023 KS1, Provisional 2023 KS2, Provisional 2023 KS4, Provisional 2023 16 to 18

Release date: 15 November 2023

Trust information

This expandable section provides information about the trust to which the school belongs. Only schools that are part of a multi-academy trust (MAT) will get this section of the report.

It will have information about the number of schools in the trust and the latest overall effectiveness grades of the schools within the trusts.

The grade profile of schools within a MAT will display the judgements a school has received under its current URN. It will display the latest inspection outcome, which could be either graded or ungraded. If a school received a grade before joining the MAT, then the school will be counted in the ‘not yet inspected’ section until it is inspected as part of the MAT.

The information in this section comes from the Department for Education’s Get Information About Schools data, apart from the overall effectiveness which is Ofsted data.

School and local context

School characteristics

The chart shows school-level information, based on the annual January school census, for 2021, 2022 and 2023. If a school has a sixth form, a separate row will appear that shows the context for Years 12, 13 and 14, where applicable.

The chart contains the following measures:

  • the number of pupils on roll

  • the percentage of pupils in receipt of free school meals (FSM) at the time of the January census; these pupils are those who are/have been eligible for FSM and have claimed them some time in the last 6 years (Reception to Year 11); FSM data is not collected for sixth forms

  • the percentage of pupils with SEND who do not have an education, health and care (EHC) plan (SEND support)

  • the percentage of pupils with SEND and who have a statement of SEND or EHC plan

  • the percentage of pupils whose first language is not English or is believed to be other than English

  • the stability percentage for the school

  • the school deprivation level

  • the pupil deprivation level

For each measure, school figures will show for each year. The quintile boxes compare the latest year to the national distribution for all schools. Text and shading are displayed depending on what quintile the school’s value resides in:

  • well above average (blue shading)

  • above average

  • close to average

  • below average

  • well below average (orange shading)

Special schools are compared with secondary school national values.

Except for the school location deprivation measure, schools are compared with the national by phase: primary (or middle deemed primary) or secondary (or middle deemed secondary).

Stability is a measure of the percentage of students who were admitted to the school at the standard time of admission. The stability percentage is calculated by dividing the number of pupils who meet the stability criteria by the number of all eligible pupils (pupils in Years 1 to 11 with a single or main dual registration at the school at the time of the January school census). The stability measure is not available for school sixth forms.

A pupil is counted as stable if they:

  • joined the school in or before September in Year 1

  • joined the school in or before the month by which at least 5% of the year group had also joined the school

  • joined the school in a month/national curriculum year combination in which at least 40% of the year group joined the school (the 40% must equate to at least 10 pupils in primary schools or 20 pupils in secondary schools)

  • joined the school in a month/national curriculum year combination in which at least 10% of the year group joined the school (the 10% must equate to at least 10 pupils in primary schools or 20 pupils in secondary schools) and the same month/national curriculum year combination met these criteria in at least 1 other year group within the school

The school deprivation level is about the level of deprivation in the local area in which the school is situated. The pupil deprivation level shows aggregated information about the deprivation of pupils who attend the school. Each deprivation indicator is based on the income deprivation affecting children index (IDACI). The IDACI is based on 2019 English Indices of Deprivation.

The IDACI measures the proportion of all children aged 0 to 15 living in income-deprived families. It is a subset of the income deprivation domain, which measures the proportion of the population in an area experiencing deprivation relating to low income. The definition of ‘low income’ we use includes both those people who are out of work and those who are in work but who have low earnings and who satisfy the respective means tests.

Information about a school’s local area is based on the 2011 lower layer super output area (LSOA) in which it resides. LSOAs are a geographic hierarchy designed to improve the reporting of small area statistics in England and Wales. They comprise between 400 and 1,200 households and have a usually resident population between 1,000 and 3,000 persons.

You can read further information about the data used for the local area deprivation.

Sentences below the table will highlight where a year group is markedly different from the others for the following measures:

  • the percentage of pupils in receipt of FSM at the time of the January census; these pupils are those who are or have been eligible for FSM and have claimed them some time in the last 6 years (Reception to Year 11)

  • the percentage of pupils who speak English as an additional language

Information is based on the 2023 January school census.

For 16 to 18 (where applicable), there are different rules that the DfE uses to allocate students to the different measures. The year group characteristics are based on the census data, so there may be students that are no longer on roll but still allocated to the provider for accountability purposes.

Ethnicity

Ethnicity information comes from the January 2023 school census. The chart displays those ethnic groups within the school that represent 5% or more of the overall cohort.

There are 17 possible ethnic groups:

  • White British

  • White Irish

  • White Traveller of Irish Heritage

  • White Gypsy/Roma

  • White Any other White background

  • Mixed White and Black Caribbean

  • Mixed White and Black African

  • Mixed White and Asian

  • Mixed Any other Mixed background

  • Asian or Asian British Indian

  • Asian or Asian British Pakistani

  • Asian or Asian British Bangladeshi

  • Asian or Asian British Any other Asian background

  • Black or Black British Caribbean

  • Black or Black British African

  • Black or Black British Any other Black background

  • Chinese

For this section, ‘Any other ethnic group’, ‘Parent/pupil preferred not to say’ and ‘Ethnicity not known’ are included, so may appear in the top 5 largest groups.

The corresponding national value for each group is displayed on its respective bar.

Bars are displayed for the whole school and sixth form (where applicable).

Prior attainment

The prior attainment table presents how pupils in school performed at the previous key stage in relation to their year group.

For 2023 prior attainment:

  • there is no prior attainment data for Years 8 and 9 because of the COVID-19 pandemic

  • it is based on those achieving the expected standard at key stage 2 for Years 7, 10 and 11

Shading indicates whether the pupils in this school were above or below national. This is triggered if the school value is 1 or 2 standard deviations from the national value. If pupils were in line with the national value, a dash is shown. If the number of pupils was 10 or below, an ‘X’ is shown.

There was no data available for 16 to 18 prior attainment in 2022. This is because these pupils did not take key stage 4 exams in 2020, because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Prior attainment for Years 1 to 6 are no longer displayed in the IDSR. This is due to a lack of data in 2023 and in future years.

SEND characteristics

The January 2023 census provides data for this table. The table displays the number of pupils in the school who have SEND and what the need category is. The 2 halves of the table represent pupils who have SEND support and pupils who have an EHC plan.

It also shows what year the pupil is in. The section above the tables displays if the school has any resourced provision. This could be a SEND unit, resourced provision or both. The capacity will represent the capacity of the provision displayed. The type of SEN provision will list, where applicable, the type of special educational need provided for. This section also displays how many pupils with SEND have been in receipt of FSM at any time during the last 6 years and/or are children looked after (in the care of the local authority for a day or more or who have been adopted from care).

SEND units are special provisions within a mainstream school. These units contain separate classes to teach pupils with SEND. These units:

  • receive extra funding from the local authority

  • cater for a specific type or types of SEND (for example, autistic spectrum disorders)

  • are usually for pupils with statements or EHC plans (but this is not required)

Resourced provision refers to the places reserved at a mainstream school for specific pupils with SEND. The pupils learn within mainstream classes but require some specialist facilities.

Resourced provision:

  • receives extra funding from the local authority

  • caters for a specific type or types of SEN, for example specific learning difficulties

  • is usually for pupils with statements or EHC plans, but this is not required

The resourced provision, capacity and type of SEN provision information comes from the DfE’s GIAS service.

The capacity of the SEND unit and/or resourced provision will also be displayed alongside the type of SEN provision.

Staffing

The staffing section of the IDSR presents information on several areas relating to staffing.

The proportion of education support staff relative to teaching staff

This sentence is based on data from the Department for Education’s School Workforce Census (November 2022). It reports on the proportion of education support staff relative to teaching staff in the latest year and, where applicable, the 2 previous years.

Example sentence

The proportion of education support staff relative to teaching staff was in the lowest 20% of all schools in 2022, 2021 and 2020.

This sentence highlights areas of high and low expenditure in the latest year, when compared with similar schools, relating to the following staffing-related areas:

  • agency supply teaching staff

  • education support staff

  • educational consultancy

  • staff development and training

  • supply teaching staff

  • teaching staff

Example sentence

Per pupil spending was in the lowest 20% of similar schools in 2021/22 for: education support staff.

Expenditure on teaching staff includes:

  • costs for teachers employed directly by the school, including supernumerary/peripatetic teachers on short-term contracts

  • all contracted full-time and part-time teachers paid within the scope of the Education Act 2002

  • gross pay, including allowances, maternity pay and the employer’s contributions to national insurance and teachers’ pensions

  • teaching and learning responsibilities (TLR)

It excludes:

  • any teachers employed casually and directly, for example supply teachers

  • any teachers not employed directly by the school, for example agency staff

Expenditure on salaries and wages for supply teaching staff consists of gross pay including allowances, maternity pay and the employer’s contributions to national insurance and superannuation.

This applies to staff employed directly by the school who are covering absence for:

  • curriculum release

  • long-term absence

  • sickness absence

  • training absence

It excludes supply teachers not employed directly by the school (that is, paid through an agency or another third party), regardless of the period of cover.

Expenditure on agency supply teaching staff relates to the money paid to an agency for teaching staff that have been brought in to cover teacher absence.

This includes cover of any period and for all reasons including illness, absence for training and any leave.

It excludes supply teachers employed directly by the school.

Expenditure: similar schools comparator 

By default, schools are compared against the 30 schools most statistically similar in the same sector (academy or maintained). These are based on pupil characteristics. Initially, a school is matched to the 60 schools most statistically similar. From that long list, schools in the same region are automatically selected for the final list of 30, with the rest of the group then made up by prioritising the most statistically similar schools.

The 30 default schools that make up this comparator group have been selected based on similarities in pupil characteristics:

  • school phase or type

  • region

  • boarding or non-boarding type

  • number of pupils

  • percentage of pupils eligible for free school meals

  • percentage of pupils with SEND, or proportion of various SEND provisions for special schools

Teacher absence

A sentence shows the percentage of teachers with at least 1 period of sickness absence versus the national rate for the latest 2 years.

Another sentence reports on the average number of days lost to teacher sickness absence in the latest year only.

Example sentences

  • The percentage of teachers with at least 1 period of sickness absence was significantly above national in 2021/22.

  • 2 days on average were lost to teacher sickness absence in 2021/22. This was in the lowest 20% nationally.

Sickness absence data collected in the November 2021 census relating to the 2020/21 year is affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

It is not possible to draw accurate comparisons with previous time periods due to factors including partially limited school openings, delivery of education through virtual means in some cases, and potential differences in the recording of sickness absence. The figures relate to sickness absence only and do not include non-attendance due to, for example, isolation and shielding.

Data on school workforce attendance during the pandemic has been collected through the DfE’s education settings survey.

Staff retention

Example sentences

  • At the time of the November 2021 census, there was 1 full-time vacant teacher post in the school.

  • Staff turnover was in the lowest 20% in 2019.

Information on staff turnover as at the 2020 school workforce census is calculated using the number of full time equivalent (FTE) turnover leavers and the total FTE staff at the school. A school will be highlighted as having high staff turnover if the turnover rate was in the highest 20% in any of the latest 3 years. Low staff turnover is not highlighted. Special schools are compared with primaries.

It is worth noting that turnover and leavers at a school level can be very volatile year to year. Further, when looking at rates of leavers and turnover it is important to be conscious of school size because this has a big impact on rates, particularly for small schools.

The DfE’s published school workforce information provides data for the vacant post measures as at November 2022.

The DfE also supplies the staff turnover source data.

The first sentence shows how many pupils (where applicable) moved into state-funded alternative provision and whether they remained there.

Example sentence

Since January 2021, 9 pupils have moved into state-funded alternative provision from this school. All pupils were still in a pupil referral unit at the time of the January 2023 census.

This section also provides information about other schools and alternative provision providers that pupils in this school were dual registered at according to the January 2022 census. The number of pupils at the school is shown in brackets.

Example sentence

According to the January 2022 census, pupils at this school were also registered at the following providers:

  • Primary – School A – URN XXXXXX (1)

Absence

Absence

Absence data is based on 2 terms for 2022/23 (autumn and spring) and 3 terms for 2021/22. A table shows when the school percentage of absence or persistent absentees was in the highest or lowest 20% for all schools or for similar schools. Similar means the same phase of education and with a similar level of deprivation (in the same IDACI quintile). Special schools are compared with the national value for secondary schools.

Absence is the aggregated total of all authorised and unauthorised absences. A pupil enrolment is identified as a persistent absentee if they miss 10% or more of their possible sessions.

Suspensions and permanent exclusions

Service children’s education provider IDSRs only have suspensions and permanent exclusions data for the latest academic year available.

The whole school measure includes all year groups in the school.

Whole school

This section is divided into 2 parts:

  • A table providing information about the school percentage of pupils with 1 or more suspensions and pupils with 2 or more suspensions.
  • Supporting sentences about pupils with 2 or more suspensions, reasons for suspensions, and the number of and reasons for permanent exclusions, where applicable. Example sentences are shown below.

The table displays the school percentage of pupils with 1 or more suspensions and 2 or more suspensions, which are calculated by dividing the number of pupils suspended by the number on roll. These percentages have been calculated for the last 3 years and are displayed in the ‘School %’ row of the table. For each year of data, we have also profiled the school’s suspensions against national comparators, indicating whether the school is in the highest 20%. This is represented in the following rows of the table:

  • ‘Comparison to all schools’ -  this profiles the school against all schools with the same phase of education. Special schools are compared with the national rate for secondary schools.

  • ‘Comparison to all schools with a similar level of deprivation’ – this profiles the school against all schools with the same phase of education and with a similar level of deprivation (in the same quintile for the income deprivation affecting children index (IDACI)). This row will not be visible for primary schools – we do not produce the comparison due to very low suspension rates.

The number of pupils with a permanent exclusion is provided for up to the last 3 years. The national average, profiled by phase of education, is included for the latest year. Special schools are compared with the national average for special schools.

The numbers and proportions of pupils with suspensions or permanent exclusions are often very small. These should be interpreted with caution, particularly when making comparisons over time. Additionally, the COVID-19 pandemic started during the 2019/20 reporting period. We are aware that rates of suspensions and permanent exclusions generally dropped during this year as a result. The suspensions and permanent exclusions data is 1 year behind. For example, 2019/20 data was published in July 2021. Suspensions and permanent exclusions data is for cohorts before the one shown on the context page and the number on roll may have changed.

Further information on pupil exclusion statistics is in the DfE’s pupil exclusion statistics methodology publication.

Suspensions

For schools with at least 1 pupil with a suspension in 2021/22, a sentence details the prevalence of repeat suspensions. For schools with between 1 and 10 pupils receiving a suspension, the sentence states how many received more than 1. If any pupils received more than 1, the sentence also states how many received 10 or more. The same applies to schools with more than 10 pupils receiving a suspension. However, the sentence quotes proportions rather than numbers of pupils.

Example sentences

Of the 7 pupils with 1 or more suspensions in 2021/22, 4 were suspended on 2 or more occasions and 1 received 10 or more suspensions during the year.

Of the 56 pupils with 1 or more suspensions in 2021/22, 34% were suspended on 2 or more occasions and 10.7% received 10 or more suspensions during the year.

For schools with at least 1 pupil with 1 or more suspensions in 2021/22, a sentence states the number of suspensions and any reasons accounting for 10% or more of the school’s suspensions, with their frequency.

Example sentence

Of the 13 suspensions in 2021/22, the following reasons each accounted for more than 10%: verbal abuse/threatening behaviour against a pupil (5), racist abuse (3), physical assault against an adult (2).

Permanent exclusions

A sentence appears for each school stating the number of permanent exclusions in each of the last 3 years, if data is available. The sentence includes the national average for the latest year, profiled by phase.

Example sentence

There was 1 permanent exclusion in 2021/22. The national average for this year was close to zero. There were none in 2020/21 but there were 2 in 2019/20.

For schools with at least 1 pupil who received a permanent exclusion, a sentence states the total number of permanent exclusions and the reasons for these, with their frequency.

Example sentence

Of the 2 permanent exclusions in 2021/22, both were for theft.

16 to 18

16 to 18 in this section relates to Years 12, 13 and 14 where applicable.

National averages for both suspensions and permanent exclusions are profiled by phase; special schools are compared with the secondary national value.

The DfE supplies the source data for this section.

Suspensions

Due to the low number of suspensions and permanent exclusions nationally in sixth forms, it has not been possible to make the same comparisons as with the whole school measure (highest 20%). Instead, we have presented suspensions in the same way as exclusions and display the school number and national number. For this same reason, the IDSR does not show students with 2 or more suspensions for sixth forms or comparisons to schools with similar levels of deprivation.

A sentence will appear stating the number of students at 16 to 18 with 1 or more suspensions in 2021/22, if there were any. The sentence will also state the national average number for the latest year. If there were also suspensions in 2020/21 and 2019/20, this information will also be presented.

Example sentence

There were 2 students at 16 to 18 with 1 or more suspensions in 2021/22. The national average for this year was 1. There were also 2 in 2019/20 but none in 2018/19.

Subsequent sentences will appear that state the reason for the suspension(s) in 2021/22.

Example sentence

Of the 2 suspensions at 16 to 18 in 2021/22, the following reasons each accounted for more than 10%: physical assault against a pupil (1), physical assault against an adult (1).

Permanent exclusions

A sentence appears for each school stating the number of permanent exclusions in each of the last 3 years, if data is available. The sentence includes the national average for the latest year.

Example sentence

There was 1 permanent exclusion at 16 to 18 in 2021/22. The national average for this year was 1. There were also 3 in 2020/21 and 2 in 2019/20.

For schools with at least 1 pupil who received a permanent exclusion, a sentence states the total number of permanent exclusions and the reasons for these, with their frequency.

Example sentence

Of the 2 permanent exclusions at 16 to 18 in 2021/22, both were for unspecified reasons.

Pupil movement

The pupil movement section presents 2 different measures of pupil movement:

  • pupils who were present in Year 10 in the first census, but not in Year 11 in the second census, at the same school

  • pupils who were present in the first census in Years 7, 8, 9 or 10, but did not appear in the second census, at the same school

We have used pupil-level data from the DfE’s spring school census to identify pupils who were in a given year in each school in January of 1 year, and whether they were still in the same school in January of the following year.

The pupil movement section of the IDSR only covers pupil movement for secondary Years 7, 8, 9 or 10.

We do not use the census data from other school terms for this analysis, for example the autumn term census. This may mean that the figures do not match those produced by some schools or local authorities.

We developed a logistic multi-level model that uses contextual factors to estimate what proportion of pupils we might expect to leave each school. This is for movements between Years 10 and 11 only. Our analysis shows that these contextual factors are associated with higher levels of pupil movement. The contextual factors that the model takes into account are pupils’ and schools’ characteristics. Pupil movement between Years 10 and 11 may be highlighted as ‘significant’ if pupil movement was higher than estimated by the model.

The following are the pupils’ characteristics:

  • gender

  • eligibility for free school meals in the past 6 years

  • speaking English as an additional language

  • key stage 2 attainment (low, middle, high or not present in key stage 2)

  • having SEND, especially social, emotional or mental health issues

  • being in either the White Irish Traveller or White Roma ethnic group

  • being looked after by a local authority

  • IDACI of home postcode

The model also takes into account whether the school area is urban.

This section of the IDSR also provides information about pupils who have left the school and then do not appear in the subsequent January school census in one of the following school types:

  • maintained nursery

  • primary

  • middle deemed primary

  • middle deemed secondary

  • secondary

  • all-through

  • special schools (including non-maintained special schools)

  • pupil referral units/alternative provision (PRU/AP)

  • academies (including free schools, university technical colleges (UTCs) and studio schools)

  • city technology colleges (CTCs)

There are destinations outside of the census that the pupil may have moved to, which schools may have information about that they can share with inspectors.

Progress and attainment at key stages 1 and 2

The ‘progress and attainment at key stages 1 and 2’ table displays where measures are significantly above or below national, alongside the associated percentile. The cohort, value and national value are also displayed.

Arrows indicate whether the school value, when compared with the national value, has changed. A dark shaded upward arrow indicates that the school difference from national has improved from the comparator year (difference of at least 2 standard deviations). A lighter shade upward arrow indicates that the school difference from national has improved slightly from the comparator year (difference of at least 1 standard deviation). Arrows pointing downwards indicate that the difference to national has become worse, with the same shading rules. A horizontal line means the school is similar to the comparator year (difference was less than 1 standard deviation or there were 10 or fewer pupils).

In the ‘1 year’ column we compare 2023 and 2022 data. In the ‘4 year’ column we compare 2023 and 2019.

A standard deviation is a measure of how dispersed the data is in relation to the mean. Low, or small, standard deviation indicates data is clustered tightly around the mean, and high, or large, standard deviation indicates data is more spread out.

The following measures are contained in this section:

  • phonics Year 1 meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 1 reading meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 1 writing meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 1 mathematics meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 2 reading progress

  • key stage 2 writing progress

  • key stage 2 mathematics progress

  • key stage 2 reading meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 2 reading achieving the higher standard

  • key stage 2 writing meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 2 writing achieving greater depth

  • key stage 2 mathematics meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 2 mathematics achieving the higher standard

  • key stage 2 reading, writing and mathematics (RWM) meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 2 English grammar, punctuation and spelling (EGPS) meeting the expected standard

  • key stage 2 EGPS achieving the higher standard

  • key stage 2 multiplication tables check (MTC)

Please note for MTC measure it is not possible to compare performance against 2019 because the assessment only became statutory in 2022. Hence the ‘4 year’ column will show ‘no data’ for all schools for this measure.

Additional sentences will be displayed below the table showing:

  • the total number of Year 1 phonics pupils and how many of them did not meet the expected standard. Where the number of pupils who did not meet the expected standard is greater than 10, the average mark for those pupils is given. The sentence also provides details of how many pupils did not sit the test, where applicable.

  • the total number of Year 2 phonics pupils and how many of them did meet the expected standard.

Example sentence

Of the 63 year 1 pupils, 12 did not meet the phonics expected standard, with an average mark of 23, and 8 did not sit the test. There were 17 pupil(s) that were screened for phonics in year 2 in 2023; 14 of those met the expected standard.

The initial release of the IDSR will not include the MTC dataset as this is received later than other primary measures.

Key stage 4 subjects

English Baccalaureate entry

The English Baccalaureate (EBacc) is a set of subjects at GCSE that keeps young people’s options open for further study and future careers. The EBacc requires pupils to have studied English language and literature, mathematics, science, geography or history, and a language. The DfE has published further guidance about the EBacc.

The EBacc entry data is calculated using early entry and discounting rules. This means that pupils who entered EBacc subjects in 2022 will have those entries counted towards their EBacc entry rate in 2023.

A sentence is shown for every school where there were at least 11 pupils. This describes the EBacc entry rate for the school in 2023. Another sentence shows the subject cluster with the lowest rate of EBacc entry (if the entry rate is below 75%). This could be either English, mathematics, science, humanities or languages.

Example sentence

The EBacc entry rate in this school in 2023 was 52%. Languages had the lowest entry rate of EBacc subject areas (56%).

Subject entries at key stage 4

This section shows the subjects that this school entered for in 2023, 2022 and 2021.

The entries figure represents the number of exam entries in a given subject, rather than the number of pupils entered. Therefore, if a pupil was entered for the same qualification in 2 different exam seasons, this would count as 2 entries. Discounting has not been applied to this table and it includes entries that may not have counted in performance measures. Early entries were not included in 2021.

The purple shading is darker where there was a greater number of entries. Subjects are grouped by EBacc, sector subject area and then listed alphabetically by subject. EBacc subjects are presented at the top by default. The sector subject areas are based on those listed in the qualification descriptions.

A shaded box and corresponding text will appear if the average point score for pupils in a particular subject is in the highest or lowest 20% of all schools and only if entry levels were at or above national entries. Cohorts of 10 or fewer will not be highlighted.

Qualification type is also included, which covers the following:

  • AS

  • EBacc AS

  • EBacc GCSE

  • EBacc L1/L2 cert

  • Free-Standing Maths level 3

  • GCSE

  • Graded music

  • L1/L2 cert

  • Level 1

  • Level 1/2

  • Level 2

  • Other at level 1

  • Other at level 2

Please note that for technical awards, any entries for a level 1 qualification may be grouped with those for the level 2 qualification in the same subject. Such figures will be represented as a single row where the ‘Qualification type’ is listed as ‘Level 1/2.’

The cohorts above the section represent total pupils at the end of key stage 4.

Progress and attainment at key stage 4

The ‘progress and attainment at key stage 4’ table displays where measures are significantly above or below national alongside the associated percentile. The cohort, value and national value are also displayed.

Arrows indicate whether the school value, when compared with the national value, has changed. A dark shaded upward arrow indicates that the school difference from national has improved from the comparator year (difference of at least 2 standard deviations). A lighter shade upward arrow indicates the school difference from national has improved slightly from the comparator year (difference of at least 1 standard deviation). Arrows pointing downwards indicate that the difference to national has become worse, with the same shading rules. A horizontal line means the school is similar to the comparator year (difference was less than 1 standard deviation or there were 10 or fewer pupils).

In the ‘1 year’ column we compare 2023 and 2022 data. In the ‘4 year’ column we compare 2023 and 2019.

A standard deviation is a measure of how dispersed the data is in relation to the mean. Low, or small, standard deviation indicates data is clustered tightly around the mean, and high, or large, standard deviation indicates data is more spread out.

The following measures are contained in this section:

  • Overall Progress 8

  • English element of Progress 8

  • Mathematics element of Progress 8

  • EBacc element of Progress 8

  • Open element of Progress 8

  • Overall Attainment 8

  • English element of Attainment 8

  • Mathematics element of Attainment 8

  • EBacc element of Attainment 8

  • Open element of Attainment 8

  • Science value added

  • Languages value added

  • Humanities value added

  • Science % at grade 4 or above

  • Languages at grade 4 or above

  • Humanities % at grade 4 or above

Destinations at key stage 4

This table displays the proportion of pupils that continued to complete specified destinations. This data is publicly available and comes from the DfE’s destinations collection.

The data for the latest year relates to the pupils who ‘sustained destinations’ in 2021/22. This means those pupils who reached the end of key stage 4 in 2020/21. The row header displays the year of completed education as the latest year.

For a destination to count, pupils must sustain participation for a 6-month period.

Blue boxes will indicate if a figure was, statistically, significantly above the national average. Orange boxes will indicate when a figure was, statistically, significantly below the national average.

If data has been suppressed due to small cohorts, ‘small cohort’ will be shown in the table. Cohort suppression in this table follows the rules used by the DfE.

Service children’s education provider IDSRs will only have the destinations for the latest year due to data availability.

16 to 18 qualification types and retention

The qualification type table is based on provisional data for 2023. The retention table is based on final data for 2022.

Qualification types

This table lists the number of students undertaking each type of qualification.

Students may be working towards more than 1 type of qualification and so may be counted more than once. Students taking courses that are not full qualifications are not included. Students taking academic qualifications other than A levels are not included in the table under individual qualification types but are included in the cohort information. Therefore, the numbers in each column may not add up to the total number of students and percentages may not add up to 100.

Below the table is a sentence which is presented when there is something significant or exceptional to highlight for the proportion of students not taking any level 3 or level 2 DfE-approved qualification in 2023. This highlights when a school is in the highest or lowest 20% nationally for the latest year or the latest 2 years.

A sentence will also be shown if the school is delivering T levels in 2023/24, as shown in published DfE data.

Retention on main study programmes

This section provides data on the extent to which a provider retains students to the end of the main learning aim of their study programme. The measure used in this section is retained and assessed.

Students are counted in the retained and assessed measure if they are retained to the end of their course and are assessed. The assessment may not necessarily be in the same subject or type of qualification they were aiming for when their studies began. However, the assessment must be at the same level and at least the same size as the main aim. For example, a student with an original main aim of tech level at size 1 would be considered as retained and assessed with an applied general exam result of at least size 1.

Data is presented for 4 study programmes:

  • A levels (including AS level)

  • level 3 applied general

  • level 3 tech level

  • level 2 technical certificate

From 2019, only technical certificates will be recognised as level 2 vocational qualifications in the 16 to 18 performance tables. In 2018, the DfE reported a broader range of qualifications. The DfE’s guidance on technical and vocational qualifications contains the lists of qualifications that count in 2019 performance tables.

A student’s study programme is defined based on their main aim. The DfE’s 16 to 18 accountability measures technical guide provides further information on how this is defined.

16 to 18 subjects – level 3

This section shows the subjects entered for by this school in 2023, 2022 and 2021.

The entries figure represents the number of exam entries in a given subject, rather than the number of pupils entered. Therefore, if a pupil was entered for the same qualification in 2 different exam seasons, this would count as 2 entries. Discounting has not been applied to this table and this includes entries that may not have counted in performance measures.

The purple shading is darker where there was a greater number of entries. Subjects are grouped by subject cluster and listed alphabetically first by cluster then by subject.

Qualification type is also included, which covers the following:

  • A level

  • applied single award

  • applied double award

  • pre-U principal

  • international baccalaureate

Please note that, where the ‘Qualification type’ is listed as ‘A level’, the entries figure is the total of any entries into the AS level qualification for that subject, plus any entries into the A2 level qualification. Similarly, where the ‘Qualification type’ is ‘Applied general’, the entries figure is the total of any entries into certificates in that subject, plus any entries into diplomas in that subject.

The cohorts above the section represent total students at the end of 16 to 18.

Attainment at 16 to 18

The ‘attainment at 16 to 18’ table displays where measures are significantly above or below national alongside the associated percentile. The cohort, value and national value are also displayed.

Arrows indicate whether the school value, when compared to the national value, has changed. A dark shaded upward arrow indicates that the school difference from national has improved from the comparator year (difference of at least 2 standard deviations). A lighter shade upward arrow indicates the school difference from national has improved slightly from the comparator year (difference of at least 1 standard deviation). Arrows pointing downwards indicate that the difference to national has become worse, with the same shading rules. A horizontal line means the school is similar to the comparator year (difference was less than 1 standard deviation or there were 10 or fewer pupils).

In the ‘1 year’ column we compare 2023 and 2022 data. In the ‘4 year’ column we compare 2023 and 2019.

A standard deviation is a measure of how dispersed the data is in relation to the mean. Low, or small, standard deviation indicates data is clustered tightly around the mean, and high, or large, standard deviation indicates data is more spread out.

The following measures are contained in this section:

  • A level average point score

  • Tech level average point score

  • Best 3 A levels average point score

  • Applied general average point score

  • A level AAB %

Destinations 16 to 18

This table displays the proportion of students who completed their study programme at the provider who went on to sustained education or employment, who went on to a destination not sustained or whose activity was not captured. It further shows what proportion of all students went on to an apprenticeship, to any education and to higher education.

The data for the latest year relates to the pupils who ‘sustained destinations’ in 2021/22. This means those pupils who reached the end of key stage 4 in 2020/21. The row header displays the year of completed education as the latest year.

Blue boxes will indicate if a figure was, statistically, significantly above the national average. Orange boxes will indicate when a figure was, statistically, significantly below the national average.

If data has been suppressed due to small cohorts, ‘small cohort’ will be shown in the table. Cohort suppression in this table follows the rules used by the DfE.

For the destinations, the DfE uses a flexible end year to determine which students are included in the measure. The DfE’s 16 to 18 accountability measures technical guide contains further information on the methodology.

This data is taken from the DfE source ‘Destinations of KS4 and 16 to 18 (KS5) students: 2022’, which includes full definitions of the measures used and further breakdowns of the data.

Pupil groups

Pupil group differences can be meaningless when analysed at school level, particularly when groups relate to small cohorts. The conversation should be about meeting the needs of all pupils.

This section may contain up to 3 tables of measures, depending on the school phase. The ‘Primary’ and/or ‘Secondary’ tables display the performance of pupil groups at the corresponding phase of education. Measures are generated for the pupil groups FSM and/or M (CLA) and low/middle/high prior attainers. The ‘Absence’ table displays if the school absence percentage is in the highest or lowest 20% of pupils eligible for FSM, pupils with SEND and pupils with English as an additional language. Only the latest year’s data is assessed in this section. Cohorts of less than 11 will not be included in this section.

For the tables of performance measures, shaded boxes and text will appear for a pupil group measure (such as Progress 8 average for low prior attainers) where the following 2 conditions are both met:

  1. The pupil group measure shows a significant difference to the national comparator for that pupil group. It may be either significantly above or significantly below

  2. The national comparison for the pupil group measure differs to that of the national comparison for the whole school (all pupils), that is, Progress 8 average for all pupils

For example, if Progress 8 for all pupils was not significantly different to national but Progress 8 for low prior attainers was significantly above national, the low attainers group will be highlighted. If Progress 8 for all pupils and Progress 8 for low prior attainers were both significantly above national, then the group will not be highlighted. All possible combinations of national comparisons for a pupil group measure and national comparisons for the whole school are illustrated in the table below, along with whether that combination will result in the measure appearing in this section.

Comparison to national for whole school Comparison to national for pupil group Will the measure appear?
Significantly above national Significantly above national No
Significantly above national In line with national No
Significantly above national Significantly below national Yes
In line with national Significantly above national Yes
In line with national In line with national No
In line with national Significantly below national  Yes
Significantly below national Significantly above national Yes
Significantly below national In line with national No
Significantly below national Significantly below national No

The text and shading are based on significance when compared with the corresponding national value for each measure, except for the FSM and/or CLA pupil group which is compared with the national for pupils who are not FSM and/or CLA.

Primary

We no longer include prior attainment groups for key stage 1 in this section of the IDSR due to lack of prior attainment data.

For key stage 2, prior attainment groups are based on overall key stage 1 prior attainment, which is calculated using an average of the English and mathematics components.

Pupil groups measures are based on the expected standard and do not appear for the high standard.

It was not possible to flag group measures for phonics attainment; this is due to the spread of the data.

It was not possible to flag group measures for attainment in MTC; this is because we do not receive details of pupil prior attainment or characteristics in the MTC results data.

Secondary

Prior attainment groups are based on overall key stage 2 prior attainment, which is calculated using reading and mathematics.

Absence

Absence measures are generated for pupils eligible for FSM, pupils with SEND and pupils with English as an additional language (EAL) and are based on 2022/23 data (2-term absence).

For the ‘Absence’ table, the shading and text generally follow the same rules as for the tables of performance measures, except that for absence the text and shading are based on quintile (highest/lowest 20%). For example, if the school percentage of persistent absentees for all pupils was not in the highest 20% nationally, but the school percentage of persistent absentees for pupils with SEND was in the highest 20% nationally, the SEND pupil group will be highlighted. If the school percentage of persistent absentees for all pupils and for pupils with SEND were both in the highest 20% nationally, then the group will not be highlighted.

Further notes

Note that:

  • due to small cohorts of low and high prior attainment groups, it is much less likely for measures to appear

  • pupil group measures for suspensions and exclusions will not be shown

  • pupil group measures for performance for 16 to 18 will not be shown – it was not possible to calculate pupil group measures for 16 to 18 in 2023, because no value-added or completion and attainment data was available as a result of COVID-19.

Understanding the data in the IDSR

Statistical significance

Assessment data and information are starting points for inspectors’ discussion with schools. Statistical significance testing is used in the IDSR to draw attention to noteworthy values. These values show when differences in school’s performance may be due to more than chance variation. The IDSR uses percentile ranking as well as statistical significance testing. This allows us to look at relative performance across time while also highlighting noteworthy changes.

For progress measures, the DfE provides Ofsted with the 95% confidence intervals, enabling the statistical significance to be calculated. The DfE publishes guidance about the Progress 8 data and confidence intervals.

Statistical significance calculations use cohort size, or number of pupils, in the calculation. Therefore, a large cohort is much more likely to show a statistically significant difference to national averages than a small cohort.

Significance calculation for threshold measures

A normal approximation to the binomial distribution is used to identify statistically significant differences between proportions of pupils.

Before applying the test, we check that:

nP

and

n(1-P)

are greater than or equal to 5.

When:

  • P represents the national average of pupils reaching the expected standard

  • n represents the total number of pupils

The calculation is as follows:

Significance calculation for threshold measures

Otherwise not statistically significant.

When:

Significance calculation for threshold measures

This methodology is applied to the following performance measures:

  • key stage 2 expected standard and high standard/greater depth thresholds

  • key stage 1 expected standard and greater depth thresholds

  • Year 1 phonics

  • destinations

One-year and 4-year arrows – worked example

School A’s data for the last 2 years is shown below:

Data year % expected standard National % expected standard National standard deviation Difference from national Difference in standard deviation
2022 54% 75% 20% -21 percentage points -1
2023 96% 75% 20% +21 percentage points +1

When we compare the difference in standard deviation from 2022 to 2023, the school has moved up by 2 standard deviations (from -1 to +1), therefore the IDSR will show a dark upward arrow.

Absence and exclusions

Absence data is usually in all IDSRs by December each year. This is because data is only provided to Ofsted after the primary IDSR release.

The permanent exclusions and suspensions data is 1 year behind. For example, 2017/18 exclusions data was published in July 2019. Exclusions data is for cohorts before the 1 shown on the context page and the number on roll may have changed.

For absence and suspensions, special schools are compared with the national value for secondary schools. For permanent exclusions, special schools are compared with the national average for special schools.

Data sources

All data in the IDSR is from the DfE. We use the data to calculate school-, local-authority- and national-level data. Pupil-level data is anonymous and does not contain names or addresses. It is not shared with inspectors at any point.

We receive the following data sets from the DfE to produce the IDSR.

National pupil database:

  • key stage 1 and phonics

  • school census to populate contextual sections

  • ASP all key stages

Performance tables:

  • school and college database (SCDB) primary and secondary

  • key stage 2

  • key stage 4

  • 16 to 18

  • level 3 value added

Absence and exclusions data:

  • school-level exclusions

  • 2-term absence

  • 3-term absence

You can find more information on the accountability measures in these DfE guidance documents:

Special schools and pupils with SEND

An IDSR is produced for special schools. However, it may contain very little information about the performance of pupils.

Pupils with SEND are a diverse group with differing needs and expectations. Therefore, the IDSR will no longer display any averages for this group.

Contextual information is provided for the group, including the breakdown of the number of pupils with SEND by primary special educational need.

Junior and middle schools

A standard sentence appears to explain that junior and middle schools have lower progress scores on average. Also, due to the age range of pupils at middle schools, pupils will have only attended a middle school for a short time before they take their key stage 2 tests.

Inspectors should be aware of this and, as with any inspection, carefully consider a range of information and data.

Missing data

There are a few possible reasons why data for some years is not shown for a particular measure.

In charts and tables, data may not be shown for some years because:

  • the measure did not exist, was defined differently or was not available to Ofsted for that year; if this is the case, the data is shown as a dash

  • the school had no pupils for a particular measure in that year; if this is the case, the cohort will be shown as a 0 and a dash will be shown for the measure

  • if the school recently changed legal status, for example from a local authority maintained school to a sponsor-led academy, the data may be shown under the predecessor school name or unique reference number (URN) in ASP

National figures

The national figures may differ from the figures published in the DfE’s performance tables and ASP. This is due to the varying decimal precisions used between organisations.

The FSM and/or CLA pupil group is compared with the national for pupils who are not FSM and/or CLA.

Prior attainment pupil groups are compared with their respective pupil group nationally.

Service children’s education providers have been assigned a phase based on the ages of pupils in the school.

Cohorts and numbers of pupils included

Cohorts display the total number of pupils based on the group and year of the measure presented.

For measures when all pupils were entered, the cohort shows the number of pupils the measure is based on. For some measures, it is used as the denominator for percentages.

If there have been any leavers and joiners, then the cohort number shown on progress and attainment data may not match the context section. The context section is a snapshot of the day the school census is taken in January of that year.

The ‘number of pupils included’ on progress pages only includes pupils with prior attainment information.

16 to 18 cohorts

There are different rules that DfE uses to allocate students to the different measures. The year group characteristics is based on the census data so there may be students that are no longer on roll but still allocated to the provider for accountability purposes. The qualification type table is based on revised data, whereas retention is from final.

For the destinations, the DfE uses a flexible end year to determine which students are included in the measure. There are more details in the accountability guide.

Conditions of use

The IDSR conditions of use and storage are that:

  • the IDSR is to be used only for educational and analytical purposes and for informing inspection, not for any other purpose

  • data presented in the IDSR is to be shared only with those who need and are authorised to have access to the information

  • only nominated users may access the IDSR and these users must be made aware that they cannot share the IDSR without permission from the data owner

  • the IDSR should be saved in a secure location with limited access

16 to 18 student groups

Prior attainment student groups are shown for some measures. These groups are based on students’ average points score at key stage 4, which is calculated by giving a point score to each grade and taking an average across all the student’s grades.

The DfE’s secondary accountability measures guidance contains further details on how these scores are calculated.

In the IDSR, we use groups of scores. For level 3 students, these are as follows:

  • students with prior attainment grades 7–9 (equivalent to grades A*–A under the old grading structure)

  • students with prior attainment grades 4–6 (equivalent to grades B–C under the old grading structure)

  • students with prior attainment grades 3 and under (equivalent to grades D–G under the old grading structure)

Comparison to national for whole school Comparison to national for pupil group Will the measure appear?
Significantly above national Significantly above national No
In line with national No  
Significantly below national Yes  
In line with national Significantly above national Yes
In line with national No  
Significantly below national Yes  
Significantly below national Significantly above national Yes
In line with national No  
Significantly below national No  

To align students’ average points scores to these groups, we calculate an upper bound and lower bound for each group.

To calculate the upper bound for each group, we calculate the midpoint between the maximum points score within the group and the minimum points score within the next highest group.

For example, to calculate the upper bound for the 4–6 group, we take the midpoint between the maximum points score for the 4–6 group (5.5) and the minimum points score for the 7–9 group (7):

Upper bound = (5.5 + 7) / 2 = 6.25

Similarly, to calculate the lower bound for each group, we calculate the midpoint between the minimum points score for the group and the maximum points score for the next lowest group.

For example, to calculate the lower bound for the 4–6 group, we take the midpoint between the minimum points score for the 4–6 group (4) and the maximum points score for the 3 and under group (3):

Upper bound = (3 + 4) / 2 = 3.5

These calculations produce the following average points score boundaries.

GCSE grade group Average points score boundaries
7–9 6.25 and above
4–6 3.5–6.25
3 and under 0–3.5

For level 2 students, we follow an equivalent process to calculate average points score boundaries for the following groups.

GCSE grade group Average points score boundaries
3-9 2.5 and above
2 1.25–2.5
1 and under 0–1.25

For value added data relating to A level, AS level and applied general qualifications, and completion and attainment data relating to tech level qualifications, the following groups based on prior attainment for level 3 students are shown:

  • students with prior attainment grades 7–9 (average points score of 6.25 or higher)

  • students with prior attainment grades 4–6 (average points score of 3.5 or above up to, but not including, 6.25)

  • students with prior attainment of 3 and under GCSE point score (average points score below 3.5)

For completion and attainment data relating to technical certificate qualifications, FSM and/or CLA students and the following groups based on prior attainment for level 2 students are shown:

  • students with prior attainment grades 3–9 (average points score of 2.5 or higher)

  • students with prior attainment grade 2 (average points score of 1.25 or above up to, but not including, 2.5)

  • students with prior attainment grade 1 and under (average points score below 1.25)

If performance does not differ from that of the provider, no sentences will appear.

Data protection

When accessing the data in the Ofsted IDSR service, you must recognise the privacy of that data and always comply with the Data Protection Act 2018. The Data Protection Act 2018 is the UK’s implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). You must ensure that you use the data that you have access to for the purpose for which the service was set up and that you do not use the data for any other purpose. You must ensure that the data is processed securely and that it is not subject to any unauthorised use or disclosure.

Published 8 October 2019
Last updated 7 February 2024 + show all updates
  1. We have updated the IDSR for all schools including schools with a sixth form with the latest pupil movement data for 2022/23 and revised key stage 2 data. We have updated the IDSR for all schools including schools with a sixth form, with the latest pupil movement data for 2022/23, and revised key stage 2 data. The guidance has been updated to reflect these changes.

  2. We have updated the IDSR for all schools including schools with a sixth form with the latest absence data for 2022/23 (autumn and spring terms), final key stage 1 and final multiplication tables data. The guidance has been updated to reflect these changes.

  3. We have updated the IDSR for secondary schools and schools with a sixth form, with the latest provisional 2023 key stage 4 and 16 to 18 data. The guidance has also been updated to reflect these changes.

  4. We have released the 2023 primary IDSR with IDSR developments for all schools, as highlighted in our last newsletter. The main data updates are latest 2023 key stage 2, key stage 1, phonics, contextual data and 2021/22 suspensions and permanent exclusions.

  5. We have updated the inspection data summary report (IDSR) for all schools. The main changes includes the 16 to 18 final 2022 data, including the updated retention measure. We also updated the trust/local authority level information section to include the most recent inspection outcome (graded or ungraded) based on latest URN for trusts only.

  6. We have updated the inspection data summary report (IDSR) for all schools. The following data has been updated: Key stage 4 - final, Key stage 2 – final (including the multiplication tables check) and absence data – 3 terms.

  7. Updated the secondary inspection data summary report (IDSR). The main changes are revisions to key stage 4, 16-18 data, pupil movement between 2021 and 2022 and destinations data. Also included are changes to the way we calculate key stage 4 subject entries.

  8. Updated the primary inspection data summary report (IDSR). The main changes are revised key stage 2, final key stage 1 and final phonics data. Also included are minor changes to the pupil movement section of the secondary school IDSR.

  9. Updated with absence data.

  10. Ofsted has released the 2022 secondary IDSR and the guidance has been updated to reflect this. The main changes include the release of 2022 key stage 4 attainment and progress data, key stage 5 attainment and developments to the pupil movement section.

  11. Ofsted has released the 2022 primary IDSR and the guidance has been updated to reflect this. The main changes are latest 2022 key stage 2, key stage 1, phonics, contextual data and 2020/21 suspensions and permanent exclusions. Also included are updates on the new functionality to remove sentences highlighted in grey.

  12. Guidance updated to reflect that EYFS profile data is no longer included in the inspection data summary report (IDSR).

  13. Updated with absence and finance data.

  14. The guidance has been updated to reflect the new web-based IDSR format, new data received since their last release and the integration of school sixth form guidance.

  15. Guidance updated in response to user queries, including information on what ‘not authorised’ means, clarification on average number of qualifications for 2021 and further details about the stability measure.

  16. Ofsted have released a November 2021 IDSR and the guidance has been updated to reflect this. The main changes are latest 2021 contextual data, a new section for 2021 subject entries and new terminology for suspensions. Supporting tables spreadsheet updated: 2021 prior attainment national averages, autumn 2020 absence bounds, suspensions bounds have been updated or added to for 2021. No performance bounds have been updated. Sentence master list updated to reflect minor improvements/changes/combinations to current area of interest sentences and incorporating 2020 and 2021 figures where applicable.

  17. New section of guidance added for the release of autumn 2020 absence data. This data is based on the DfE census collection and has been provided as a new section within the IDSR.

  18. Added two spreadsheets: sentence master list and supporting data tables.

  19. Guidance amended to reflect the latest version of the IDSR, including example reports.

  20. Updated guidance to incorporate the addition of 'service children education providers' and the supporting tables have been updated to reflect the release of revised key stage 4 data.

  21. Updated to include final 2019 EYFS, supporting tables updated with revised KS2, data for disadvantaged pupils and final 2019 EYFS and a new master list of all 2019 areas of interest sentences.

  22. Updated the guidance to enhance users understanding of the ‘grey’ area of interest sentences and added more direct links for ease of use.

  23. Updated supporting data tables to include key stage 1 attainment of the expected standard by Early Years Foundation Stage prior outcome.

  24. Updates the 'English Baccalaureate entry' section.

  25. Updated guide and data tables following further releases of data.

  26. Added IDSR guidance for secondary schools.

  27. Added a link to the DfE Sign-in for users to log into Analyse School Performance to view and download their schools' IDSR. Also added an example secondary school IDSR.

  28. Added 2019 supporting data tables.

  29. Added an example inspection data summary report.

  30. First published.