Policy paper

National Proton Beam Therapy Service Development Programme

The strategic outline case and accompanying value for money addendum

Documents

National Proton Beam Therapy Service Development Programme: Strategic outline case

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National Proton Beam Therapy Service Development Programme: Value for money addendum to strategic outline case

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If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format please email publications@dh.gsi.gov.uk quoting your address, telephone number along with the title of the publication ("National Proton Beam Therapy Service Development Programme: Value for money addendum to strategic outline case").

Detail

Access to high quality modern radiotherapy techniques such as Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) will support improved outcomes, increase cure rates and improve patient experience by minimising long-term side effects of treatment. PBT is currently not available in this country and patients travel overseas for treatment.

These documents demonstrate how the proposals for the NHS to invest £250m public capital in building Proton Beam Therapy facilities at The Christie Hospital in Manchester and University College London Hospital and the development of a National PBT service in this country will not only benefit patients but will also provide value for money for the taxpayer.

The programme is being nationally lead to ensure that services are developed as part of a fully integrated network of care, providing access for patients from all parts of the country. These are large and technically complex facilities and the first one plans to be operational from the end of 2017. While facilities in England are being developed, patients with high priority cancer types will continue to be sent overseas for this treatment.

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