Guidance

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefits: technical guidance

Updated 30 March 2017

1. About this guide

This is one of several guides that give detailed information about social security benefits.

It is intended for professional advisers and members of the public who want to know more about benefits for people who are disabled as a result of injuries or diseases arising from work.

1.1 This guide and the law

The guide gives a detailed explanation about benefits for people who are disabled as a result of accidents or diseases arising from work. It cannot cover every situation or problem, or provide a full interpretation of the rules in all cases. So it must not be treated as a complete and authoritative statement of the law.

The basis of the law for these benefits is contained in the Social Security Act 1998, the Social Security Contributions and Benefits Act 1992 and the Social Security Administration Act 1992. These Acts provide the framework for the detailed rules contained in regulations and orders made by the Secretary of State and approved by Parliament.

In the text there are references to the relevant Acts, Regulations or Schedules to allow you to consult the legislation. These documents are listed in further information which tells you where you can consult them.

2. Introduction to the Industrial Injuries Scheme

The Industrial Injuries Scheme provides non-contributory no-fault benefits for disablement because of an accident at work, or because of one of over 70 prescribed diseases known to be a risk from certain jobs. The scheme also covers people working on approved employment training schemes or courses. (See Appendix 1 for a list of the prescribed diseases.) The benefits payable under the scheme are known as Industrial Injuries Scheme Benefits (IISB).

Benefits are paid to employees who were employed earners at the time of the accident or when they contracted a prescribed disease, or to people who were working on an approved employment training scheme or course. (Legislation (1) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 2(1)(a))

Accidents or diseases which arise out of self-employment or service in HM forces are not included in the scheme. (Legislation (2) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 2(1)(b)) (Legislation (3) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 115)

The Home Office has a similar scheme for prisoners.

All Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefits, except Industrial Death Benefit, are tax free.

They are payable in addition to other incapacity and disability benefits but taken into account against income-related benefits.

The Industrial Injuries Scheme Benefits are:

  • Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit
  • Constant Attendance Allowance
  • Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance
  • Reduced Earnings Allowance
  • Retirement Allowance

2.1 If you cannot act for yourself

If you wish to claim for any of these benefits but you are unable to act for yourself because of physical or mental incapacity, the Secretary of State can appoint someone to act on your behalf. If this happens, the person appointed is responsible for dealing with all your social security affairs, including claiming and receiving benefits. They are also responsible for notifying any changes of circumstances which may affect your benefit. (Legislation (4) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 33)

If you are able to handle your own affairs but want someone else to collect your benefit for you regularly, you may be able to make arrangements with your bank, building society or the Post Office®. Please ask them to help you with this. (Legislation (5) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 20A(4)(b))

2.2 If someone who was disabled because of an accident at work or a prescribed disease dies

If someone who has not claimed Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit dies, but they would have qualified for this benefit, a claim can be made on their behalf, for example by a widow or surviving civil partner. (Legislation (6) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 30(5))

If someone who has claimed Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit dies, any outstanding benefit can be paid to a third party, for example an executor or next of kin. (Legislation (7) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 30(2))

3. Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

3.1 Eligibility

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is a weekly benefit paid to people who become disabled because of an accident at work or due to certain prescribed diseases caused by their job, or whilst working on an approved employment training scheme or course. See Appendix 1 for a list of prescribed diseases.

The amount you get depends on how badly you are disabled as a result of the industrial injury or disease.

Employed earner’s employment

Only employed earners, or people who can be treated as employed earners, are covered by the Industrial Injuries Scheme, or people who were on an approved employment training scheme or course when the accident or event happened. (Legislation (8) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 94 –accidents) (Legislation (9) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 108 –prescribed diseases)

An employed earner is a person who is gainfully employed in Great Britain either under a contract of service or is an office holder (for example, a company director). (Legislation (10) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 2(1)(a))

Some people who are not employed earners are treated as though they were for the purposes of the scheme, for example:

  • special constables, who are not paid and so cannot be said to be working for reward
  • agency staff who are self-employed under a contract for services but are still liable to pay Class 1 National Insurance (NI) contributions in respect of their earnings. Legislation (11) - SS (Employed Earners Employment for Industrial Injuries Purposes) Regs 1975 Sched 1 Part 1 & Sched 3)
  • people who were on an approved employment training scheme or course when the accident or event happened

3.2 How to claim Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

You do not need to have paid any NI contributions in order to claim Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit.

If your accident or disease is caused by self-employed work or employment not treated as employed earner’s employment, you are not covered by the scheme.

You cannot get industrial injuries benefits for accidents which occur or diseases contracted while serving in HM forces. You may be able to get compensation through the War Pensions Scheme or Armed Forces Compensation Scheme. (Legislation (12) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 115(2))

If you are not sure whether you are covered you can contact Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre on 0345 758 5433.

The decision maker will give an informal opinion on employed earner’s employment and if it is accepted that the employment is as an employed earner no further question on employment status arises.

If it is not accepted that the employment is as an employed earner, any claim to benefit will be disallowed. If you dispute a disallowance, your papers will be sent to the Inland Revenue for a formal decision on employed earner’s employment.

Residence in Great Britain

You must normally have had the accident or got the disease in Great Britain, but you may still get benefit if:

  • you were a mariner, airman, worked on the continental shelf of the United Kingdom, or worked in another European Union (EU) country or Norway (Legislation (13) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 117) (Legislation (14) - SSB (PA) Regs 1975 reg 10c & 11)
  • your employer was paying Class 1 NI contributions for you while you (Legislation (15) - SS Contributions Regs 1979 reg 120) were working out of the country
  • you were paying special Class 2 contributions as a volunteer (Legislation (16) - SSB (PA) Regs 1975 reg 10(c)5 & 6) development worker
  • you worked in one of the countries with which Great Britain has an agreement covering industrial injuries

Obtaining a claim form

Obtain a claim form from Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre. They can be contacted on 0345 758 5433. You can also download the forms from the Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit guide.

The claim packs are:

  • BI 100A, Industrial Accidents
  • BI 100PD, Prescribed Industrial Diseases

When to claim

If you think you have a disease caused by your job or whilst working on an approved employment training scheme or course claim Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit straight away.

If you have an accident, claim 2 months after the accident. This is because you cannot get benefit for the first 15 weeks (90 days not including Sundays) after your accident and you will not normally be medically examined until after this time.

If you have any relevant medical evidence, or a copy of your accident report, send it with your claim form but do not delay claiming by trying to get a fresh report.

Do not delay claiming. If you do you may lose some benefits. This is because Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit cannot be paid:

  • for a period more than 3 months before the date of your claim (Legislation (17) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 19(1) & Sched 4)
  • more than 1 month before the date of claim, if you are already receiving Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit for other accidents or diseases. (Legislation (18) - SS&CS (D&A) Regs 1999 reg 7(2))
  • different rules apply to claims for occupational deafness - you cannot get benefit for any period before the date of claim, see ‘Prescribed diseases’.

The date of your claim is the date your fully completed claim form is received by an office of the DWP. It is very important that you fill in all the details on the form carefully and return it to us as soon as possible. Details of where to send your claim form are in the BI100A Notes. (Legislation (19) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 6)

If you want help filling in your claim form, contact Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre on 0345 758 5433.

4. Industrial accidents

An ‘accident’ for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit purposes means any unintended happening or incident at work that has arisen out of and in the course of your employment, or whilst on an approved employment training scheme or course and has resulted in a personal injury.

It must have arisen from employed earner’s employment, or whilst on an approved employment training scheme or course. (Legislation (20) - SS Act 1998 sec 29 6(b))

You can only get benefit if the accident results in personal injury (also described as loss of faculty). It does not matter if the effect of the injury is immediate (for example, if you break your leg in a fall) or is delayed (for example, a blow to the knee which leads to impaired mobility at a later time). Generally an accident which happens when you are at work is accepted as having happened as a result of your work, unless there is some evidence that this is not so. Whether or not you are considered to be at work at a particular time depends on the circumstances in each case. For example, you cannot normally be regarded as being at work when you are travelling to or from work, but you may be if you are in transport provided by your employer. (Legislation (21) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 99)

An accident can be treated as having happened when you were at work and as a result of your work if it occurred in any of the situations below:

  • because you were doing something you were employed to do
  • because your work put you at special risk
  • while you were helping in an emergency, for instance in rescue work at any premises used for your employer’s business. (Legislation (22) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 100)

If you were doing something which your employer does not allow you to do, or the rules for your job do not allow you to do, the accident may still be treated as having happened during, and as a result of your work, if what you were doing was done for the purpose of your employer’s business and was within the scope of your job.

In some other unusual cases, such as ‘skylarking’ by workmates, an accident can be covered if it happens through no fault of your own while you are at work.

4.1 Making a benefit claim for an industrial accident

When to claim

Do not delay in making a claim if you think you may be entitled to Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit as a result of your accident.

If you have any relevant medical evidence send it with your claim form but do not delay claiming by trying to get a fresh report.

Do not delay claiming. If you do you may lose some benefits. This is because Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit cannot be paid:

  • for a period more than 3 months before the date of your claim
  • if you are already in receipt of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit for other accidents or diseases, more than 1 month before the date of claim (Legislation (27) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 19(1) & Sched 4)

How to claim

Obtain a claim form BI100A from Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre. You can also download the forms from the Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit guide.

The date of your claim is the date your fully completed claim form is received in an office of the DWP. It is very important that you carefully fill in all the details on the form and return it to us as soon as possible. Details of where to send your claim form are in the BI100 Notes. (Legislation (28) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 6)

Once we have received your application, you will be sent a written acknowledgement. They will normally write to your employer/training scheme provider to verify the accident.

Confirmation is needed of the following:

  • the time, date and place of the accident
  • that the accident arose out of and in the course of your employment or whilst on an approved employment training scheme or course
  • that your employment was employed earner’s employment or on an approved employment training scheme or course
  • that the employment was in Great Britain or was covered by special provisions

The accident must have happened in the course of your employment while you were doing anything which: (Legislation (25) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 94–101)

  • you were authorised, expressly or by implication, to do by your employer
  • was so closely related to your employment that it was reasonable for you to be doing it
  • is covered by the special provisions regarding actions in an emergency, transport provided by the employer, breach of the rules or accident caused by another person’s behaviour

Once the decision maker has accepted that you have suffered an industrial accident, you will then be asked to attend a medical examination. (Legislation (29) - SS Act 1998 sec 19(1))

If you are asked to attend a medical examination and you fail to turn up without good cause, your claim will be disallowed. (Legislation (30) - SS Act 1998 sec 19(3))

About the medical examination

Your medical examination will be carried out by 1 or possibly 2 experienced medical practitioners.

These doctors are specially trained in industrial injuries disablement matters.

If you can travel, you will be told when and where to go for the examination. You will be told what out-of-pocket expenses you can claim. If you are not fit to travel alone, someone can travel with you. (Legislation (31) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 26)

If you are not fit to travel, you can also request an examination at home. You should give full details of why you are unable to attend at a Medical Boarding Centre.

The medical examination will be held in private but you may be able to take a companion if the doctor allows it. Occasionally you may be asked if an observer can be present.

You can give the doctor any evidence which was not included with your claim form, if you think it will help them to give an opinion on your disablement.

If you have attended a hospital following an industrial accident, the doctor may seek further information from the hospital. Hospital case notes may be requested by the doctor to assist in giving an opinion.

The doctor could also ask for a report from your GP.

The doctor will take a statement from you and send a written report to the decision maker based upon the examination and any other medical evidence. The doctor will give an opinion on whether you have suffered a loss of faculty as a result of the accident and, if so, advise on the level of your disablement and how long it is expected to last. The doctor will also provide an explanation for the decision maker about how they arrived at that opinion.

What is a loss of faculty?

Loss of physical or mental faculty means some loss of power or function of an organ of the body. Loss of faculty can include disfigurement even when this causes no bodily handicap. Whether a loss of faculty results in disability is decided by comparing your condition as a result of the accident with the condition of a normal healthy person of the same age and sex. (Legislation (32) - Commissioners Decisions R(I)7/67 and R(I)1/81)

Degree of disablement

Your disablement is assessed as a percentage up to 100%.

The degree of disablement for certain defined injuries is laid down in the Regulations. For example, for serious disablement such as loss of both hands or loss of sight the degree of disablement is 100%, for the loss of one hand it is normally 60%, and for the loss of an index finger it is usually 14%. The percentages listed in Regulations for different disablements is in Appendix 2. (Legislation (33) - SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 Sched 2)

The degree of disablement for injuries not listed in the Regulations is arrived at by comparing them with these standards.

The medical advice or assessment takes account of all disabilities resulting from the industrial accident. Where your disability also results from some other cause which arose before the accident, the degree of disablement which would in any event be present due to that other cause is not counted, but the interaction between the 2 causes is included in the assessment.

For example, a miner who has had considerable trouble with his back for many years and who is known to have lumbar spondylosis, injures his back lifting a heavy weight at work.

The doctor considers a gross assessment of disablement for injury to the spine and deducts an amount for the disablement already present due to the earlier back problems. (Legislation (34) - SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 reg 11)

If your disablement is 11% or more, and some other condition arises after the accident but is not directly caused by it, any increase in your disablement due to the accident as a result of that other cause is also used to work out your disablement.

For example, a man fractured his left forearm in a fall at work. After the industrial accident he was involved in a traffic accident and fractured his left collar bone.

The doctor considers an assessment of disablement for injury to the forearm and if that assessment is over 11% the doctor adds a further assessment for the extent that the later fracture increases the man’s disability.

You may be given a ‘final’ assessment of disablement for life if your disability is assessed as permanent and is unlikely to change. Or where you are likely to make a full recovery the assessment may be final but for a limited period. Or you may be given a provisional assessment for a limited period at the end of which you will be re-examined and your disablement assessed again. (Legislation (35) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 6(2))

4.2 The decision on your claim

After the medical examination, your claim will be decided by a decision maker. The decision maker will look at the doctor’s advice and any other available evidence.

We will write to tell you the decision on your claim, the amount of any benefit you will get and the period for which you will receive benefit.

The decision only takes account of your physical or mental condition. Basic Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is not affected by what type of job you do or any loss of earnings. It can be paid whether or not you have returned to work and it does not depend on your earnings.

Loss of earnings and other circumstances may, however, mean you can get one or more of the other benefits described later in this guide.

If you disagree with the decision on your claim

See NI260 – A guide to Revision, Supersession and Appeal.

4.3 Payment of benefit

How much benefit you will get

The amount of benefit you get depends on how badly you are disabled by the accident.

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit cannot be paid for the first 15 weeks (90 days not including Sundays) after the date of your accident. (Legislation (36) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(6))

You will not get benefit if your disablement is assessed at less than 14%. (Legislation (37) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(1))

But you may be able to get benefit if you have had more than one accident or disease and the total disablement, when the effects of all the accidents and diseases are added together, is 14% or more. This is known as aggregation. (Legislation (38) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(2))

If your disablement is at least 14% your benefit will be paid as a weekly pension.

If your disablement is:

  • between 14% and 19% you will get a pension at the 20% rate
  • 20% or over it will be rounded up or down to the nearest 10%. (Legislation (39) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(3))

The following table provides a breakdown of the percentage assessment and percentage payable:

Percentage assessment Percentage payable
14 – 24% 20%
25 – 34% 30%
35 – 44% 40%
45 – 54% 50%
55 – 64% 60%
65 – 74% 70%
75 – 84% 80%
85 – 94% 90%
95 – 100% 100%

The maximum rate payable for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is 100% even if you have several assessments which add up to over 100%.

For current rates see benefit and pension rates (PDF, 210KB).

How you are paid

Our policy is to pay all benefits directly into an account.

This is the safest way to pay you and lets you choose how and when you get your money. You can use a bank or building society.

You may be able to use a cash machine, which will usually mean you can get your money at any time of the day or night.

There are arrangements with banks and building societies so that you can collect cash from some of their accounts at your Post Office® branch.

The Post Office® also provides a bank account that we can pay benefits into. With this account you can only collect your money in cash from Post Office® branches.

The other advantages of having your money paid into an account are:

  • you can get your money from many different places
  • from some accounts you could have regular bills paid - this could save you money, but you will need to make sure that there is enough money in your account to pay the bills, if not, you may be charged a fee
  • using an account may help you save

The account can be in:

  • your name
  • the name of your partner - we use partner to mean a person you are married to or a person you live with as if you were married to them, or a civil partner or a person you live with as if you are civil partners
  • the names of both yourself and your partner
  • the name of the person acting on your behalf
  • the names of both yourself and the person acting on your behalf

Benefit is paid either every 4 weeks, every 13 weeks or every week.

If you have a bank or building society account but you do not wish to use it, for example a joint account, any bank or building society will help you open an account that suits you better. Remember to ask whether their accounts allow you to get your money from the Post Office®, if this is important to you.

Basic bank account

If you have had problems opening a current account, or if you are worried about being overdrawn, you could ask any bank or building society about opening a basic bank account.

These are sometimes called introductory or starter accounts and are available from all major banks.

These accounts offer free banking but overdrafts are not available.

You can use these accounts to pay money in, pay bills automatically and get cash out.

Many basic bank accounts also allow you to get cash from Post Offices®.

If your circumstances change

A decision can be looked at again at any time if your condition has changed.

If the condition improves you must tell us straight away.

If you feel your condition has got worse and you want us to have another look at the decision, complete and return form BI168, which you can get from Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre.

If you are receiving Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit you must also tell us if you:

  • marry, remarry or form a civil partnership and change your name
  • change your address
  • leave the country
  • go into prison

(Legislation (40) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 32)

If you leave the country

If you leave the country, Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is payable while you are away.

For further details please read the how you are paid paragraphs of this guide. (Legislation (41) - SSB (PA) Regs 1975 reg 9)

If you intend to be away for more than 3 months, payment of your benefit will be made by the International Pensions Centre (IPC).

You will be asked how you want your payments to be made while you are away. You can choose between:

  • Direct Payment to a United Kingdom (UK) bank or building society account every 4 or 13 weeks
  • payable orders sent directly to you every 4 or 13 weeks while you are away
  • Transcontinental Automated Payments (TAPS), if the country has this arrangement with Jobcentre Plus
  • payment to a nominee
  • payment when you return to the UK

You must let us know when you return to the UK.

If you go to prison

If you go into prison, you must let us know the date you were admitted.

Payment of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is suspended during any period of imprisonment.

When you are released let us know the date. Arrears of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit may be paid for the period of imprisonment subject to a maximum of one year’s benefit. (Legislation (42) - SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1987 reg 2(6) & 2(7))

If you die

If you die, someone should let us know straight away.

4.4 Effects of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit on other benefits

Your basic Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit does not affect any other National Insurance benefits such as:

  • Incapacity Benefit
  • Employment and Support Allowance (contribution-based)
  • Contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Retirement Pension

But Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit may affect income-related benefits that you or your partner receive such as:

  • Income Support
  • Employment and Support Allowance (income-related)
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Pension Credit
  • Housing Benefit
  • Working Tax Credit
  • Child Tax Credit
  • Universal Credit

You will have to contact your local authority to confirm if any reduction you or your partner receive in your council tax bill is affected.

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit may also affect how much War Pension you get, if you are entitled to both.

5. Prescribed diseases

5.1 Introduction

The law provides for payment of benefits to people who are suffering from certain diseases contracted in the course of certain types of employment or whilst working on an approved employment training scheme or course. These diseases are referred to as prescribed diseases (PDs) and are listed in Regulations. (Legislation (43) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 108(1)) (Legislation (44) - SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 Sched 1)

A disease or injury is prescribed when it is a risk arising from a person’s occupation and not a risk common to everybody. The Industrial Injuries Advisory Council (IIAC) makes recommendations to the Secretary of State on what diseases the Industrial Injuries Scheme covers. (Legislation (45) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 108(2))

IIAC will only recommend that a disease be added to the list of diseases covered if it finds that the disease is a risk of nature of the occupation. There is no entitlement to benefit in respect of a disease if it is not listed in the Regulations, or if the person’s job is not listed against the particular disease. But there may be entitlement to benefit under the industrial accident provisions if a disease has been caused as a result of an accident.

If you are told that you are not entitled to benefit for a certain disease, it does not necessarily mean you do not have the disease for which you claimed. What you are being told is that you do not meet the criteria laid down in law for receiving benefit for that disease.

For example, a coal miner may be refused benefit for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-COPD even though he has the disease. However, unless his actual work history satisfied the occupational criteria set out in regulations, he will not be entitled to benefit.

This is especially important for diseases common in the population at large, where some workers would have got the disease whatever job they did.

5.2 Which diseases are prescribed

Prescribed diseases are grouped according to their causes. There are four groups of causes, each identified by a letter, and each prescribed disease has a number. The groups are:

  • A for a physical cause
  • B for a biological cause
  • C for a chemical cause
  • D for any other cause

A full list of the prescribed diseases and types of occupation which are covered by the scheme is set out in Appendix 1. (Legislation (47) - SS(II) (PD) Regs 1985 Sched 1)

5.3 Questions arising on a prescribed diseases claim

The primary questions arising on a prescribed disease claim are:

  • is the disease a prescribed disease?
  • is the disease prescribed in relation to your occupation and work history - this involves considering whether your employment could have caused the disease, and whether the employment was employed earner’s employment or was whilst on an approved employment training scheme or course?
  • are you suffering from the disease, or have you suffered from the disease - this is called the diagnosis question?
  • is the disease due to the nature of your employment or the nature of your approved training scheme or course?
  • when was the date of onset of the disease?
  • have you suffered a relevant loss of faculty due to the disease?

5.4 Making a benefit claim for a prescribed disease

When to claim

You can make a claim at any time on or after the date you think you contracted the prescribed disease.

If you have any relevant medical evidence send it with your claim form but do not delay claiming by trying to get a fresh report.

Do not delay claiming. If you do you may lose some benefits. This is because Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit cannot be paid:

  • for a period more than 3 months before the date of your claim
  • if you are already in receipt of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit for other accidents or diseases, more than 1 month before the date of claim. (Legislation (51) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 19(1) & Sched 4)

How to claim

Obtain a claim form from Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre. They can be contacted on 0345 758 5433. You can also download the form from the Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit guide.

The date of your claim is the date your fully completed claim form is received in an office of the DWP. It is very important that you fill in all the details on the form carefully and return it to us as soon as possible. There is one claim pack BI100PD for claiming Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit for all prescribed diseases.

How claims are decided

When you have completed the claim form, return it to us as soon as possible. If you have any medical evidence relevant to your claim, you should send it with the claim form. Details of where to send your claim form are in the BI00PD Notes.

You will be sent a written acknowledgement that the claim form has been received.

We may have to contact your employer(s)/training scheme provider to confirm:

  • your periods of employment
  • that your employment was employed earner’s employment or on an approved employment training scheme or course
  • that you worked with any of the listed tools or in conditions which are relevant for your claim

If you satisfy the prescription question

Your papers will be referred to medical services and you may be asked to attend a medical examination. (Legislation (52) - SS Act 1998 sec 19(1))

If you are asked to attend a medical examination and you fail to turn up without good cause, your claim will be disallowed. (Legislation (53) - SS Act 1998 sec 19(3))

If you do not satisfy the prescription question

Your claim will be disallowed and we will write to tell you this.

Fast track cases

Claims for prescribed disease D3 and for all other diseases where the person is terminally ill, are treated as fast track cases. These cases are given priority at all times.

Specific criteria

Details of the diseases and the qualifying conditions can be found at Appendix 1

About the medical examination

Your medical examination will be carried out by one or possibly two experienced medical practitioners. These doctors are specially trained in industrial injuries disablement matters.

If you can travel, you will be told when and where to go for the examination. You will be told what out-of-pocket expenses you can claim. If you are not fit to travel alone, someone can travel with you. If you are not fit to travel, you can also request an examination at home but you should give full details of why you are unable to attend a Medical Boarding Centre.

The medical examination will be held in private but you may be able to take a companion if the doctor allows it. Occasionally you may be asked if an observer can be present. You can give the doctor any evidence which was not included with your claim form, if you think it will help them to give an opinion on your disablement.

If you have attended a hospital in connection with the disease you are claiming for, the doctor may seek further information from the hospital. Hospital case notes may be requested by the doctor to assist in giving an opinion. The doctor could also ask for a report from your GP.

The doctor will take a statement from you and send a written report to the decision maker based upon the examination and any other medical evidence.

The doctor will advise on:

  • whether you are suffering from a prescribed disease, and if so
  • whether you have suffered a loss of faculty from the disease, and if so
  • the level of your disablement and how long it is expected to last

If the doctor has advised that you are suffering from a prescribed disease he will also advise on the date of onset of the disease.

The doctor will also provide an explanation for the decision maker as to how they arrived at their opinion.

The doctor will also advise if, in their opinion, the disease is due to the nature of your employed earner’s employment. This is called causation.

Special arrangements

For some prescribed diseases you will need to have tests before the medical examination.

Occupational deafness

In claims for occupational deafness, we will arrange for you to have a hearing test to see if you have an average hearing loss of at least 50 decibels in both ears due to damage to the inner ear. In at least one ear this must be due to noise at work. If the doctor advises that you satisfy this test you will then have a medical examination. If not, your claim will be sent back to the decision maker who will consider whether to disallow it.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – COPD (previously known as Chronic bronchitis and emphysema)

In claims for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – COPD, it may be necessary for you to have a breathing test. If the doctor advises that you satisfy this test you will then have a medical examination. If not, your claim will be sent back to the decision maker who will consider whether to disallow it.

Pneumoconiosis

In claims for pneumoconiosis, we will normally arrange for you to have an X-ray of your chest. If the X-ray and other evidence shows that you may have the disease you will then have a medical examination. If the X-ray shows no trace of the disease your claim will be sent back to the decision maker who will consider whether to disallow it.

What is a loss of faculty?

Loss of physical or mental faculty means some loss of power or function of an organ of the body. Loss of faculty can include disfigurement even when this causes no bodily handicap. Whether a loss of faculty results in disability is decided by comparing your condition as a result of the disease with the condition of a normal healthy person of the same age and sex. (Legislation (58) - Commissioners Decisions R(I)7/67 and R(I)1/81)

What is the date of onset?

The date of onset of a disease is the date you first suffered a loss of faculty from the disease. The date of onset may be earlier than the date that benefit is actually paid from. This is because the date benefit is paid from is governed by time limits for claiming and other criteria. (Legislation (59) - SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 6(2)(b))

Degree of disablement

The medical advice or assessment takes account of all disabilities resulting from the disease. Where your disability also results from some other cause which arose before you got the disease, the degree of disablement which would in any event be present due to that other cause is not counted, but the interaction between the two causes is included in the assessment.

For example, an assembly worker who had previously fractured her right arm in a road accident is diagnosed as having prescribed disease A4 (cramp of the hand or forearm) in the same arm.

The doctor considers a gross assessment of disablement for upper limb dysfunction and deducts an amount for the disablement that remains due to the earlier accident.

If your disablement is 11% or more, and some other condition arises after the accident or disease but is not directly caused by it, any increase in your disablement due to the disease as a result of that other cause is also used to work out your disablement.

For example, a man who is diagnosed as having prescribed disease A11 (vibration white finger) has also developed osteoarthritis in one of his fingers at a later date.

The doctor considers an assessment of disablement for upper limb dysfunction and if that assessment is over 11% the doctor adds a further assessment for the extent that the osteoarthritis increases the man’s disability. (Legislation (60) - SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 reg 11)

Different types of assessment

You may be given a ‘final’ assessment of disablement for life if your disability is assessed as permanent and is unlikely to change. Or where you are likely to make a full recovery the assessment may be final but for a limited period. Or you may be given a provisional assessment for a limited period at the end of which you will be re-examined and your disablement assessed again. (Legislation (61) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 6(2))

5.5 The decision on your claim

After the medical examination your claim will be decided by a decision maker. The decision maker will look at the doctor’s advice and any other available evidence.

We will write to tell you the decision on your claim, the amount of any benefit you will get and the period for which you will get benefit.

The decision only takes account of your physical or mental condition it is not related to whether or not you are capable of work. It can be paid whether or not you have returned to work and it does not depend on your earnings.

Loss of earnings and other circumstances may, however, mean you can get one or more of the other benefits described later in this guide.

If you disagree with the decision

See NI260 – A guide to Revision, Supersession and Appeal.

5.6 Payment of benefit

How much benefit you will get

The amount of benefit you get depends on how badly you are disabled by the disease.

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit cannot be paid for the first 15 weeks (90 days not including Sundays), after the date of onset of the disease. (Legislation (62) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(6))

The exception to this is in claims for occupational deafness, when payment can only be made from the date the claim form is received in an office of the DWP, and in claims for diffuse mesothelioma and asbestos-related lung cancer, when payment can be made from the date you were first disabled by the disease but not for more than 3 months before the date of your claim. (Legislation (63) - SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 6(2)(c), SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 20(4)(a), SS (C&P) Regs 1987 Sched 4)

You will not normally get benefit if your disablement is less than 14%. (Legislation (64) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(1), SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(2))

But you may be able to get benefit if you have had more than 1 accident or disease and the total disablement, when the effects of all the accidents and diseases are added together, is 14% or more. This is known as aggregation.

If your disablement is at least 14% your benefit will be paid as a weekly pension. (Legislation (65) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(2), SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 22)

If your disablement is:

  • between 14% and 19% you will get a pension at the 20% rate
  • 20% or over it will be rounded up or down to the nearest 10%. (Legislation (66) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 103(3), SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 15)

The following table provides a breakdown of the percentage assessment and percentage payable:

Percentage assessment Percentage payable
14 – 24 % 20%
25 – 34 % 30%
35 – 44 % 40%
45 – 54 % 50%
55 – 64 % 60%
65 – 74 % 70%
75 – 84 % 80%
85 – 94 % 90%
95 – 100% 100%

The maximum rate payable for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is 100% even if you have several assessments which add up to more than 100%.

For current rates see benefit and pension rates (PDF, 210KB).

5.7 Rules for specific diseases

Pneumoconiosis and byssinosis

For the respiratory diseases pneumoconiosis, byssinosis you can get benefit if your disablement is assessed as at least 1%. (Legislation (67) - SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 20A(1))

Diffuse mesothelioma

For the respiratory disease diffuse mesothelioma your disablement will be assessed as being 100%. (Legislation (67) - SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 20A(1))

For this respiratory disease your disablement will be assessed as being 100%.

Occupational deafness

To get benefit for occupational deafness, your disablement must be assessed as 20% or more. (Legislation (68) - SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 29(a))

If the assessment is less than 20% for occupational deafness it cannot be aggregated with any other assessment of disablement. (Legislation (69) - SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 15(3))

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – COPD

If you claim for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – COPD you must not already be getting any benefit which takes full account of this condition.

For example, if you have been awarded Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit for pneumoconiosis and your disablement from pneumoconiosis, or pneumoconiosis with tuberculosis, has been assessed at 50% or more you may have already had your benefit increased to take full account of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – COPD.

If so you will not qualify separately for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – COPD but if you think your COPD has got worse, you should apply to have your assessment for pneumoconiosis looked at again in case it can be increased.

5.8 How you are paid

Our policy is to pay all benefits directly into an account.

This is the safest way to pay you and lets you choose how and when you get your money. You can use a bank or building society.

You may be able to use a cash machine, which will usually mean you can get your money at any time of the day or night.

There are arrangements with banks and building societies so that you can collect cash from some of their accounts at your Post Office® branch.

The other advantages of having your money paid into an account are:

  • you can get your money from many different places
  • from some accounts you could have regular bills paid - this could save you money but you will need to make sure that there is enough money in your account to pay the bills, if not, you may be charged a fee
  • using an account may help you save

The account can be in:

  • your name
  • the name of your partner. We use partner to mean a person you are married to or a person you live with as if you were married to them, or a civil partner or a person you live with as if you are civil partners
  • the names of both yourself and your partner
  • the name of the person acting on your behalf
  • the names of both yourself and the person acting on your behalf

Benefit is paid either every 4 weeks, every 13 weeks or every week.

If you have a bank or building society account but you do not wish to use it, for example a joint account, any bank or building society will help you open an account that suits you better. Remember to ask whether their accounts allow you to get your money from the Post Office®, if this is important to you.

Basic bank account

If you have had problems opening a current account, or if you are worried about being overdrawn, you could ask any bank or building society about opening a basic bank account.

These are sometimes called introductory or starter accounts and are available from all major banks.

These accounts offer free banking but overdrafts are not available.

You can use these accounts to pay money in, pay bills automatically and get cash out.

Many basic bank accounts also allow you to get cash from Post Offices®.

If your circumstances change

A decision can be looked at again at any time if your condition has changed.

If you feel your condition has got worse and you want us to have another look at the decision, complete and return form BI168, which you can get from Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre.

If the condition for which you are getting benefit improves you must tell us straight away.

If you are receiving Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit you must also tell us if you:

  • marry, remarry, or form a civil partnership and change your name
  • change your address
  • leave the country
  • go into prison

If any of these apply, you must tell Barnsley Industrial Injuries Benefit Delivery Centre straight away. You can contact them on 0345 758 5433. (Legislation (70) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 3)

If you leave the country

If you leave the country, Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is payable while you are away. For further details please read the how you are paid paragraphs of this guide.

If you intend to be away for more than 3 months, payment of your benefit will be made by the International Pensions Centre (IPC).

You will be asked how you want your payments to be made while you are away. You can choose between:

  • Direct Payment to a United Kingdom (UK) bank, building society or Post Office® card account every 4 or 13 weeks
  • payable orders sent directly to you every 4 or 13 weeks while you are away
  • Transcontinental Automated Payments (TAPS), if the country has this arrangement with Jobcentre Plus
  • payment to a nominee
  • payment when you return to the UK

You must let us know when you return to the UK.

If you go to prison

If you go into prison, you must let us know the date you were admitted.

Payment of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is suspended during any period of imprisonment.

When you are released let us know the date. Arrears of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit may be paid for the period of imprisonment subject to a maximum of one year’s benefit.

If you die

If you die, someone should let us know straight away.

5.9 Effects of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit on other benefits

Your basic Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit does not affect any other National Insurance (NI) benefits such as:

  • Incapacity Benefit
  • Employment and Support Allowance (contribution-based)
  • Contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Retirement Pension

But Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit may affect income-related benefits that you or your partner receive such as:

  • Income Support
  • Employment and Support Allowance (income-related)
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Pension Credit
  • Housing Benefit
  • Working Tax Credit
  • Child Tax Credit
  • Universal Credit

You will have to contact your local authority to confirm if any reduction you or your partner receive in your council tax bill is affected.

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit may also affect how much War Pension you get, if you are entitled to both.

6. Constant Attendance Allowance

6.1 Conditions of entitlement

Constant Attendance Allowance (CAA) can be paid if you need constant care and attention as a result of your injury or disease. (Legislation (71) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 104)

You can get CAA if:

  • you are dependent on attendance for the necessities of life
  • the attendance is needed as a result of the relevant loss of faculty and attendance will be needed for a prolonged period

CAA cannot be paid for help with ordinary housework or for similar domestic purposes, and it is not paid simply for help with dressing and undressing

To be entitled to CAA, you have to show that you need daily attendance and are likely to need it for a long time. Although you must show that you need daily attendance, the attendance need not last throughout the day and you may not actually receive it.

Attendance need not be provided on a paid basis and CAA can still be paid when attendance is provided by a relative.

Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit must be the 100% rate payable for you to be considered for CAA. (Legislation (72) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 104(1))

But you may also receive it if you get Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit of less than 100% and payments for disablement under the War Pension scheme which bring your total disablement to at least 100% (Legislation (73) - SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 reg 20).

6.2 How and when to claim

If Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit is payable at the 100% rate, an opinion will automatically be given for CAA at the time of your medical examination.

You only need apply for CAA if you are already receiving Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit at the 100% rate, did not have any attendance needs at the time of your award, but your condition means that you now need constant attendance. If you are already in receipt of CAA, but your condition has worsened since the award, you may be entitled to an increase. You should claim on form BI107 which you can get from Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre. You can contact them on 0345 758 5433.

6.3 How claims are decided

Medical services carry out an examination at the same time as giving an opinion on the extent of your disablement for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit. The doctor will complete a report and advise on your need for attendance. They will look at and consider:

  • the nature and amount of attendance you need
  • if you are dependent on attendance for the necessities of life
  • if you need attendance as a result of the relevant loss of faculty

The decision maker will consider the doctors report and any other evidence and will decide the rate, amount and period of the award. The award will be renewed if you continue to satisfy the conditions.

6.4 The decision on your claim

You will be notified of the decision in writing. It will explain how the decision was arrived at and if there is any entitlement to benefit.

6.5 If you disagree with the decision

There is no right of appeal against a decision on CAA. If you disagree with the decision you can ask for it to be reconsidered if you consider you have good reason. (Legislation (75) - SS&CS (D&A) Regs 1999 Sched 2 para 14(a))

See NI260 – A guide to Revision, Supersession and Appeal.

6.6 How much benefit you will get

How much benefit you get depends on how much looking after you need. For current rates see benefit and pension rates (PDF, 210KB).

There are 4 rates of CAA based on the amount of attendance you need.

These are:

  • part-time
  • normal maximum
  • intermediate
  • exceptional (Legislation (74) - SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 reg 19, SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 4 para 2)

6.7 How you are paid

Payment of your CAA will be made with your Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit direct into an account.

6.8 If your circumstances change

If you are getting CAA you must tell us straight away if you are admitted to hospital or similar institution.

CAA is payable for the first 4 weeks of free in-patient treatment if:

  • you are already receiving CAA at the date of admission or
  • CAA is subsequently granted for a period which includes the date of admission. (Legislation (76) - SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 reg 21(2))

If you are in hospital longer than 4 weeks and payment has stopped, you can receive payment for certain periods when you are allowed to leave hospital. Payment will start again when you are discharged.

If you go abroad, CAA can be paid for 6 months from the date you go, or for a longer period as the Secretary of State may allow. (Legislation (77) - SSB (PA) Regs 1975 reg 9(4))

6.9 Effects of CAA on other benefits

If you qualify for CAA, you cannot also get Attendance Allowance (AA), the care component of Disability Living Allowance (DLA), or the daily living component of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) unless it is higher than the CAA. In that case you will get CAA and may get the balance of the other benefit.

Receipt of CAA is not taken into account as income in some other benefits such as:

  • Incapacity Benefit
  • Employment and Support Allowance (contribution-based)
  • Contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Retirement Pension
  • Income Support
  • Employment and Support Allowance (income-related)
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Pension Credit
  • Housing Benefit
  • Working Tax Credit
  • Child Tax Credit
  • Universal Credit

You will have to contact your local authority to confirm if any reduction you or your partner receive in your council tax bill is affected.

While you are getting CAA, the person looking after you may be able to get Carer’s Allowance (CA) or may have their rights to a state pension protected. Although CA is not income related itself - it is taken into account as income related benefits. So if the person you are caring for is in receipt of income related benefits they should seek advice before claiming CA.

7. Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance

This is an extra allowance if you are exceptionally severely disabled and already entitled to CAA at the intermediate or exceptional rate, and your need for the attendance is likely to be permanent. (Legislation (78) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 105(1)(a)(b), SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 reg 43 & 44)

You do not have to make a separate claim. Your entitlement will be considered at the same time as your CAA.

7.1 How claims are decided

When CAA is granted at the intermediate or exceptional rate, entitlement to Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance is automatically considered at the same time.

The decision maker looks at the doctor’s advice and decides the period of the award. Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance is usually awarded for the same period as CAA. The allowance may be reconsidered from time to time depending on your circumstances.

7.2 The decision on your claim

You will be notified of the decision in writing. It will explain how the decision was arrived at and if there is any entitlement to benefit.

7.3 If you disagree with the decision

There is no right of appeal against a decision on Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance. If you disagree with the decision you can ask for it to be reconsidered if you think you have good reason. (Legislation (79) - SS&CS (D&A) Regs 1999 Sched 2 para 14(a))

See NI260 – A guide to Revision, Supersession and Appeal.

7.4 How you are paid

Payment of your Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance will be made with your Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit and Constant Attendance Allowance direct into an account.

7.5 If your circumstances change

If you are absent abroad, Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance can be paid for 6 months from the date of absence from the United Kingdom, or for such longer period as the Secretary of State may allow. (Legislation (80) - SSB (PA) Regs 1975 9(4))

If you are admitted to hospital or a similar institution for medical treatment you can continue to receive Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance.

7.6 Effects on other benefits

Your Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance does not affect any other National Insurance benefits such as:

  • Incapacity Benefit
  • Employment and Support Allowance (contribution-based)
  • Contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Retirement Pension

However, Exceptionally Severe Disablement Allowance may affect income-related benefits you or your partner receive such as:

  • Income Support
  • Employment and Support Allowance (income-related)
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Pension Credit
  • Housing Benefit
  • Working Tax Credit
  • Child Tax Credit
  • Universal Credit

You will have to contact your local authority to confirm if any reduction you or your partner receive in your council tax bill is affected.

8. Reduced Earnings Allowance

8.1 Conditions of entitlement

Reduced Earnings Allowance (REA) is a separate benefit to Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit. It can be paid on its own or in addition to Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit. REA was introduced from 1 October 1986 and replaced Special Hardship Allowance (SHA). (Legislation (81) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 11(1))

REA can be paid on top of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit. If you do not get Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit because your disablement is less than 14% you can still get REA as long as your disablement is assessed at 1% or more.

REA compensates for the loss of earnings’ capacity where, as a result of an industrial accident or disease, you are unable to either:

  • return to your regular occupation
  • carry out other work producing the same level of earnings

There is no entitlement to REA for an accident:

  • which occurred on or after 1 October 1990 (Legislation (81) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 11(1)) or
  • a prescribed disease with a date of onset on or after 1 October 1990 or
  • prescribed disease which was added to the list of prescribed diseases on or after 10 October 1994 irrespective of the date of onset or
  • an extension to a prescribed disease made on or after 10 October 1994 irrespective of the date of onset

To be entitled to REA you must satisfy the following conditions:

  • have an assessment of disablement of at least 1%
  • be incapable of following your regular occupation as a result of the relevant loss of faculty
  • be incapable of work of an equivalent standard which is considered suitable in your case and:
  • either are likely to be permanently incapable of following your regular occupation (known as the permanent condition)
  • or at all times since the end of the 90 day period (excluding Sundays) following the date of accident or date of onset of the prescribed disease, have been incapable of your regular occupation or suitable alternative employment (known as the continuous condition)

A regular occupation must be gainful employment, but it does not have to be employed earner‘s employment. This will occur when the work done at the time of the accident was employed earner‘s employment but it was not your regular occupation.

A regular occupation for a prescribed disease is normally the occupation which caused the disease.

Whether other employment is of an equivalent standard depends mainly on whether the pay is comparable. But your chances of promotion to higher paid work in your regular occupation can also be taken into account in some circumstances.

Only employed earner’s employment can be considered as employment of an equivalent standard. (Legislation (82) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 11(5)(b))

If you gave up an occupation because of the relevant loss of faculty due to the prescribed disease for which you have an assessment, that occupation can be your regular occupation even if you stopped following it before the prescribed disease was:

  • added to the list of prescribed diseases
  • altered to include your work

Your occupation may be treated as your regular occupation if you:

  • had to give up an occupation because of the effects of an industrial accident or prescribed disease and
  • subsequently receive a disablement assessment for that accident or disease (Legislation (83) - SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 reg 17)

If you are suffering from pneumoconiosis and the doctor who examined you for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit purposes gave advice about the conditions in which you should work, there are rules which may help you qualify for REA if you leave your regular occupation. You will usually be regarded as unable to continue in that occupation or to do work of an equivalent standard. This will apply even if the doctor advised that you could continue in your occupation in suitable dust conditions.

If you have more than 1 accident or prescribed disease, you can claim REA for each accident or prescribed disease.

8.2 How and when to claim

Contact us on 0345 758 5433 for a claim form BI103.

The date of your claim is the date your fully completed claim form is received in an office of the DWP. It is very important that you carefully fill in all the details on the form and return it to Barrow Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre as soon as possible. The office mailing address is on the claim form. (Legislation (84) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 6)

Claim as soon as you think you meet the rules for the allowance. Do not delay claiming until the result of your Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit claim is determined, as you could lose benefit for any period more than 3 months before the date of claim. (Legislation (85) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 Sched 4 para 5)

If you want help filling in your claim form, contact us on 0345 758 5433.

8.3 How claims are decided

When you have completed the claim form return it to Barrow Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre. Barrow’s mailing address is on the claim form.

Your papers are then sent to medical services for advice on whether:

  • you are capable of following your regular occupation
  • the date from which you are incapable of following your regular occupation
  • you are temporarily or permanently incapable of following your regular occupation
  • you are incapable of alternative remunerative employment
  • if you are not completely incapable of work, what limitations, if any, exist which restrict the type of work you can do

The decision maker will use this advice to determine whether or not you have any entitlement to REA.

8.4 The decision on your claim

We may contact your current or previous employers to obtain employment and earnings information about:

  • your regular occupation
  • your present occupation
  • any occupation you have had since your accident or disease

If your regular occupation no longer exists, your earnings may be calculated by referring to an index based on the changes in the level of earnings as published in the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings.

REA will be awarded for a limited period. At the end of this period, we will invite you to make a renewal REA claim unless your assessment of disablement was final and expires at the same time as the REA award.

We will send you a renewal form before your award ends. If you were entitled to REA on 30 September 1990 and you subsequently cease to be entitled for 1 or more days, you cannot again become entitled to REA for that accident or prescribed disease. You should complete and return the form as soon as possible to avoid any delays in payment or a possible permanent loss of your entitlement to REA. You must still complete a renewal form even if payment is temporarily suspended for any reason. The decision maker will decide:

  • whether up-to-date medical advice is needed
  • if further employment enquiries need to be made

8.5 If you disagree with the decision

See NI260 – A guide to Revision, Supersession and Appeal.

8.6 How much benefit you will get

The amount of REA payable is the difference between your earnings in your regular and alternative occupations. There is a maximum amount of REA payable, even if the difference in earnings between your regular and alternative occupation is greater than this amount.

This maximum is equivalent to the 40% rate of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit. (Legislation (86) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 11(10))

If you receive more than 1 REA award, the maximum amount of REA and any Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit you can receive equates to the 140% rate of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit.

You will be notified of the amount of benefit you are entitled to.

REA under the Industrial Injuries Scheme can be paid as well as an allowance for a lower standard of occupation under the War Pension scheme.

REA, like most social security benefits, goes up from time to time, but your REA will not be increased if before 9 April 1989 you received REA and retired for social security purposes.

If you reach pension age now, your entitlement to REA is transferred to entitlement to Retirement Allowance if you are not in regular employment. (Legislation (87) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 12)

See Retirement Allowance.

8.7 How you are paid

Our policy is to pay all benefits directly into an account.

This is the safest way to pay you and lets you choose how and when you get your money. You can use a bank or building society.

You may be able to use a cash machine, which will usually mean you can get your money at any time of the day or night.

There are arrangements with banks and building societies so that you can collect cash from some of their accounts at your Post Office® branch.

The Post Office® also provides a bank account that we can pay benefits into. With this account you can only collect your money in cash from Post Office® branches.

The other advantages of having your money paid into an account are:

  • you can get your money from many different places
  • from some accounts you could have regular bills paid - this could save you money but you will need to make sure that there is enough money in your account to pay the bills, if not, you may be charged a fee
  • using an account may help you save

The account can be in:

  • your name
  • the name of your partner - we use partner to mean a person you are married to or a person you live with as if you were married to them, or a civil partner or a person you live with as if you are civil partners
  • the names of both yourself and your partner
  • the name of the person acting on your behalf
  • the names of both yourself and the person acting on your behalf

Benefit is paid either every 4 weeks, every 13 weeks or every week.

If you have a bank or building society account but you do not wish to use it, for example a joint account, any bank or building society will help you open an account that suits you better. Remember to ask whether their accounts allow you to get your money from the Post Office® if this is important to you.

8.8 Basic bank account

If you have had problems opening a current account, or if you are worried about being overdrawn, you could ask any bank or building society about opening a basic bank account.

These are sometimes called introductory or starter accounts and are available from all major banks.

These accounts offer free banking but overdrafts are not available.

You can use these accounts to pay money in, pay bills automatically and get cash out.

Many basic bank accounts also allow you to get cash from Post Offices®.

8.9 If your circumstances change

You must tell Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Centre straight away, as your award may be affected, if:

  • you stop or start working
  • your earnings alter
  • you change occupation
  • you are over pension age and stop working an average of ten hours a week
  • you stop or start getting Incapacity Benefit

You must also tell Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Centre straight away if you:

  • marry, remarry or form a civil partnership and change your name
  • change your address
  • leave the country
  • go into prison

8.10 If you leave the country

If you go abroad to a country where there is no reciprocal arrangement and the European Union (EU) regulations do not apply, REA can be paid for the first 3 months abroad if:

  • your stay is temporary
  • your stay is not for business purposes in any way
  • the claim for REA was made before you went abroad

(Legislation (88) - SSB (PA) Regs 1975 reg 9(5))

To qualify for REA when you return to the UK, you must have had title to REA throughout your stay even if REA is not paid during part of the absence. If title to REA is not maintained you may not be able to receive REA again.

8.11 If you go to prison

If you are imprisoned you cannot get REA. You must tell Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre when you are admitted and when you are released. (Legislation (89) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 113(1)(b), SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 reg 2)

8.12 If you die

If you die, someone should let us know straight away.

8.13 Effects of REA on other benefits

Your REA does not affect any other National Insurance benefits such as:

  • Employment and Support Allowance
  • Employment and Support Allowance (contribution-based)
  • Contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Retirement Pension

But REA may affect income-related benefits you or your partner receive such as:

  • Income Support
  • Employment and Support Allowance (income-related)
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Pension Credit
  • Housing Benefit
  • Working Tax Credit
  • Child Tax Credit
  • Universal Credit

You will have to contact your local authority to confirm if any reduction you or your partner receive in your council tax bill is affected.

9. Retirement Allowance

9.1 Conditions of entitlement

Retirement Allowance (RA) replaces REA when you reach state pension age if REA is at least £2 a week and you are not in regular employment. (Legislation (90) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 13(1) & (2))

If REA is paid at less than £2 a week and you are not in regular employment when you reach state pension age you will not be entitled to either REA or RA.

Regular employment means working under a contract of service for an average of 10 hours a week or more over a period of 5 consecutive weeks or more. (Legislation (91) - SS (II) (Regular Employment) Regs 1990 reg 2)

If you are in regular employment when you reach state pension age, you will continue to receive REA for as long as you remain in regular employment. Once you stop regular employment your entitlement to REA will be replaced by entitlement to RA, provided that REA was payable at over £2 a week.

You do not need to claim RA. You will be sent a letter to complete before reaching state pension age. There will be a part of this you have to complete and return before a decision can be made. The letter will ask for details of your employment.

9.2 The decision on your claim

You will be notified of the decision in writing. It will explain the decision and if there is any benefit payable.

9.3 If you disagree with the decision

See NI260 – A guide to Revision, Supersession and Appeal.

9.4 How much benefit you will get

RA is paid for life. (Legislation (92) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 13(3))

The weekly rate of RA is whichever of the following is less (1/2 pence or more being rounded up:

  • 25% of the weekly rate of REA to which you were last entitled
  • 10% of the 100% Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit pension rate. (Legislation (93) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 13(4), (6) & (11))

You can only get one award of RA, regardless of how many REA awards were in payment previously.

9.5 How you are paid

RA will be paid in the same way as your REA direct into an account.

It is paid either every week, every 4 weeks or every 13 weeks.

If you are receiving Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit your RA will be paid together direct into the same account.

9.6 If your circumstances change

If you are imprisoned you cannot get RA. You must tell Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre when you are admitted. When you are released tell Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre straight away so that payment can be considered again. (Legislation (94) - SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 reg 2 & 3)

If you are living abroad and have maintained underlying entitlement to REA whilst abroad, even though disqualified from receiving payment, you can be awarded and paid RA once you are over the minimum pension age and cease regular employment.

If you are entitled to RA and live, or go to live, in any country you will continue to receive RA for life. (Legislation (95) - SSB (PA) Regs 1975 reg 9(7))

9.7 Effects of Retirement Allowance on other benefits

Your Retirement Allowance does not affect any other National Insurance benefits such as:

  • Incapacity Benefit
  • Employment and Support Allowance (contribution-based)
  • Contribution-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Retirement Pension

But Retirement Allowance may affect income-related benefits you or your partner (We use partner to mean a person you are married to or a person you live with as if you were married to them, or a civil partner or a person you live with as if you are civil partners.) receive such as:

  • Income Support
  • Employment and Support Allowance (income-related)
  • Income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance
  • Pension Credit
  • Housing Benefit
  • Working Tax Credit
  • Child Tax Credit
  • Universal Credit

You will have to contact your local authority to confirm if any reduction you or your partner receive in your council tax bill is affected.

10. Unemployability Supplement

10.1 Conditions of entitlement

From 6 April 1987, Unemployability Supplement (UNSUPP) was abolished as an increase of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit. People in receipt of Unemployability Supplement on 6 April 1987 were allowed to continue to receive it providing they satisfied the benefit criteria.

10.2 If your circumstances change

You must also tell us if you:

  • marry, remarry or form a civil partnership and change your name
  • change your address
  • leave the country
  • go into prison
  • go into hospital or similar accommodation

If any of these apply, you must tell Barnsley Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre straight away. They can be contacted on 0345 758 5433. (Legislation (128) - SS (C&P) Regs 1987 reg 32)

If you die, someone should let us know straight away.

You must also tell us if you are claiming an increase for a dependant and their circumstances change.

11. Additional payment for people whose employer has gone out of business

11.1 Pneumoconiosis etc (Workers’ Compensation) Act 1979

This is an additional payment which you can claim. It covers people, or dependants of people, who suffer from certain industrial diseases caused by dust.

You can make a claim if you are unable to get damages from your employer who caused or contributed to the disease.

The diseases covered are:

  • diffuse mesothelioma
  • pneumoconiosis (including asbestosis, silicosis and kaolinosis)
  • diffuse pleural thickening
  • primary carcinoma of the lung if accompanied by asbestosis or diffuse pleural thickening
  • byssinosis

11.2 How to claim

If you are suffering from one of the above diseases and you think you may be entitled to a payment, contact the Pneumoconiosis etc (Worker’s Compensation) Act 1979 Section as soon as possible.

Do not wait for the outcome of your claim under the Industrial Injuries scheme before you make a claim for this additional payment.

11.3 The 2008 Diffuse Mesothelioma Scheme

This is a scheme for people suffering from the asbestos-related disease, diffuse mesothelioma.

11.4 Eligibility

You can claim a one-off lump sum payment if you:

  • are unable to claim under the 1979 Pneumoconiosis Act
  • have not received a payment in respect of the disease from an employer, a civil claim or elsewhere and
  • are not entitled to compensation from a Ministry of Defence scheme

The scheme covers people whose exposure to asbestos occurred in the United Kingdom and was not as a result of their work as an employee. For example:

  • you came into contact with asbestos from a relative, eg by washing their clothes
  • you were exposed to asbestos in the environment, eg you lived near a factory using asbestos
  • your exposure to asbestos was while you were self-employed

11.5 How to claim

You should make a claim as soon as possible. Claims must be received within 12 months of your date of diagnosis. You should submit medical evidence with your claim showing that you are suffering from diffuse mesothelioma caused by exposure to asbestos. Your lung cancer nurse may be able to supply this. No further medical examination will be offered.

If the sufferer has died, their dependants may be able to claim. The claim form must be received within 12 months of the date of death.

11.6 Further Information

For further information or to request a claim form, PWC1, phone or write to the Barrow Industrial Injuries Benefit Centre.

PWC Team
Barrow Benefit Centre
Post Handling Site B
Wolverhampton
WV99 1RX

Telephone: 0800 279 2322

12. Simplification changes under the Welfare Reform Act 2012

From 5 December 2012, the following changes were made to the Industrial Injuries Scheme to make it easier for people to understand and for the Department to administer the benefits.

12.1 The Pneumoconiosis, Byssinosis and Miscellaneous Diseases Benefit Scheme, and the Workmen’s Compensation (Supplementation) Scheme

These 2 old schemes that dealt with industrial accidents or disease exposures before 1948 were abolished on 5 December 2012. Those customers in receipt of payments were transferred to the main Industrial Injuries Scheme and received benefits at the corresponding rates of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit.

12.2 Death Benefit

If you were supported by someone formerly entitled under the PB&MD scheme, and who has since died from one of the diseases listed under the PB&MD scheme, you may get a payment of up to £300. (Legislation (125) - PB&MDB Scheme 1983 Article 9) For a claim form write to or phone the PWC team at Barrow Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre at:

PWC Team
Barrow Benefit Centre
Post Handling Site B
Wolverhampton
WV99 1RX

Telephone: 0800 279 2322

Send your completed claim form to this address also. You should normally claim within 3 months of the death.

12.3 The under 18 rates of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

On 5 December 2012, the lower rate of Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit paid to people under the age of 18 was abolished. Everyone with the same level of disability will receive the same rate of benefit.

12.4 Industrial Accident declarations

From 5 December 2012, it will not be possible to request a declaration that an industrial accident occurred without a claim for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit being made.

12.5 Industrial Death Benefit

Industrial Death Benefit was abolished in 1988 for any deaths occurring after 1988. From 5 December 2012, it will not be possible for a new claim to be made for a death before 1988. No claims had been made for many years and any widows or widowers still getting payments will continue to receive them.

12.6 If your circumstances change

Industrial Death Benefit for a widow is usually a pension payable for life following the deceased’s death. It is not payable:

  • if you remarry or form a civil partnership (Legislation (104) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 15(2))
  • for any period when you and a man you are not married to are living together as husband and wife (Legislation (105) - SS C&B Act 1992 Sched 7 para 15(3))
  • if you are in prison (Legislation (106) - SS C&B Act 1992 sec 113(1))

If any of the above apply you must tell the Industrial Death Benefit section at Barrow Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit Centre straight away.

12.7 If you die

If you die, someone should let us know straight away.

13. Further information

13.1 Rates of benefits

Rates of benefits are published each year in the Social Security Benefits Uprating Order, which is debated by Parliament, usually towards the end of the year. Benefits are usually uprated from April, at the beginning of the financial year. For current rates see benefit and pension rates (PDF, 210KB).

13.2 Social security leaflets

You can get copies of the leaflets from:

  • Jobcentre Plus for Jobcentre Plus leaflets and most others
  • Post offices or Jobcentre Plus offices for the main leaflets
  • your local council for leaflets on Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit

13.3 The Acts, Regulations and the ‘Blue Volumes’

The Acts and Regulations which set down the rules explained in this guide are included in a series of loose-leaf books, The Law relating to Social Security (also known as the Blue Volumes) which are published by the Stationery Office. The relevant Acts and Regulations are indexed and kept up to date by regular supplements. You can consult a copy at your Jobcentre Plus office, and many libraries also have a copy. Copies can also be bought from the Stationery Office.

This technical guide is only a guide to Industrial Injuries Benefits. It has no status in law, but it refers you to the Acts and Regulations which cover particular rules. The Regulations may be changed or added to from time to time by Amendment Regulations. Also, each year a set of Uprating Regulations is published changing the benefit rates.

The main Acts and Regulations which govern Industrial Injuries Benefits are currently:

  • Social Security Act 1998
  • Social Security Contributions and Benefits Act 1992
  • Social Security Administration Act 1992
  • Social Security (Claims and Payments) Regulations 1987

13.4 Abbreviations key for legislation

Abbreviation Full version
PB&MDB Scheme 1983 Pneumoconiosis, Byssinosis and Miscellaneous Diseases Benefit Scheme 1983
SS Act 1998 Social Security Act 1998
SS Contributions Regs 1979 Social Security Contributions Regulations 1979
SSB (PA) Regs 1975 Social Security Benefit (Persons Abroad) Regulations 1975
SS (C&P) Regs 1987 Social Security (Claims and Payments) Regulations 1987
SS (II) (PD) Regs 1985 Social Security (Industrial Injuries) Prescribed Diseases) Regulations 1985
SS&CS (D&A) Regs 1999 Social Security and Child Support (Decisions and Appeals) Regulations 1999
SS (WB and RP) Regs 1979 Social Security (Widow’s Benefit & Retirement Pension) Regulations 1979
SS (Hospital In-patients) Regs 1975 Social Security (Hospital In-patients) Regulations 1975
SS Administration Act 1992 Social Security Administration Act 1992
SSP (HR) Regs 1994 Social Security Pensions (Home Responsibilities) Regulations 1994
SS (Overlapping Benefits) Regs 1979 Social Security (Overlapping Benefits) Regulations 1979
SS (II) (Regular Employment) Regs 1990 Social Security (Industrial Injuries) (Regular Employment) Regulations 1990
WC(S) Scheme 1982 Workmen’s Compensation (Supplementation) Scheme 1982
SS C&B Act 1992 Social Security Contributions and Benefits Act 1992
SS (Gen Ben) Regs 1982 Social Security (General Benefits) Regulations 1982

13.5 Useful addresses

Attendance Allowance/Disability Living Allowance

Disability Benefits Unit
Warbreck House
Warbreck Hill Road
Blackpool
Lancashire
FY2 0UZ

Carer’s Allowance Unit

DWP
Palatine House
Lancaster Road
Preston
PR1 1NS

Compensation Recovery

Compensation Recovery Unit
Durham House
Washington
Tyne and Wear
NE38 7SF

Disablement Services Authority

For information about artificial limbs and wheelchairs contact:

Disablement Services Authority:
Government Buildings
Warbreck Hill Road
Blackpool
FY2 0YF

HM Revenue & Customs

HM Revenue & Customs
Contracted-out Employments Group
Longbenton
Newcastle
NE98 1YX

International Pensions Centre (IPC)

General industrial injuries enquiries:

The Pension Service 11
Mail Handling Site A
Wolverhampton
WV98 1LW

Motability

Warwick House
Roydon Road
Harlow
Essex
CM19 5PX

National Insurance contributions enquiries

HM Revenue & Customs
Charity, Assets & Residence, Residency
Room BP1301
Benton Park View
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE98 1ZZ

Service Personnel and Veterans Agency

Service Personnel and Veterans Agency
Tomlinson House
Norcross
Thornton-Cleveleys
Lancashire
FY5 3WP

14. Appendix 1: List of diseases covered by Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit

List of diseases which are covered and the kinds of jobs which are included. It is not a complete list of jobs and you should not be put off claiming just because your job is not listed. If in doubt, claim.

Disease Number Name of disease or injury Type of job
Conditions due to physical agents (physical cause) Any job involving
A1 Leukaemia (other than chronic lymphatic leukaemia) or cancer of the bone, female breast, testis or thyroid, cancers of the colon, liver, lung, stomach, ovary and bladder. Exposure to ionising radiation where the dose is sufficient to double the risk of the occurrence of the condition. For example, people working in the nuclear industry and hospital X-ray departments.
A2 Cataract Frequent or prolonged exposure to radiation from red-hot or white-hot material. For example, glass and metal workers, stokers.
A3(a) A3(b) a) Dysbarism, including decompression sickness, barotrauma. For example, the bends.

b) Osteonecrosis
Subjection to compressed or rarefied air or other respirable gases or gaseous mixtures. For example, underwater or tunnel workers
A4 Task specific focal dystonia of the hand or forearm. For example, writer’s cramp. Prolonged periods of handwriting, typing or other repetitive movements of the fingers, hand or arm.
A5 Subcutaneous cellulitis of the hand. Manual labour causing severe or prolonged friction or pressure on the hand. For example, miners and road workers using picks and shovels.
A6 Bursitis or subcutaneous cellulitis arising at or about the knee due to severe or prolonged external friction or pressure at or about the knee. For example, housemaid’s knee Manual labour causing severe or prolonged external friction or pressure at or about the knee. For example, workers who kneel a lot.
A7 Bursitis or subcutaneous cellulitis arising at or about the elbow due to severe or prolonged external friction or pressure at or about the elbow. Manual labour causing severe or prolonged external friction or pressure at or about the elbow. For example, jobs involving continuous rubbing or pressure on the elbow.
A8 Traumatic inflammation of the tendons of the hand or forearm, or of the associated tendon sheaths. Tenosynovitis. Manual labour, or frequent or repeated movements of the hand or wrist. For example, routine assembly workers.
A10 Occupational deafness. Sensorineural hearing loss amounting to at least 50dB in each ear, being the average of hearing losses at 1, 2 and 3 kHz frequencies, and being due in the case of at least one ear to occupational noise. The use of, or work wholly or mainly in the immediate vicinity of the use of, a:
(a) band saw, circular saw or cutting disc to cut metal in the metal founding or forging industries, circular saw to cut products in the manufacture of steel, powered (other than hand powered) grinding tool on metal (other than sheet metal or plate metal), pneumatic percussive tool on metal, pressurised air arc tool to gouge metal, burner or torch to cut or dress steel-based products, skid transfer bank, knock out and shake out grid in a foundry, machine (other than a power press machine) to forge metal including a machine used to drop stamp metal by means of closed or open dies or drop hammers, machine to cut or shape or clean metal nails, or plasma spray gun to spray molten metal;
(b) pneumatic percussive tool to drill rock in a quarry, on stone in a quarry works, underground, for mining coal, for sinking a shaft, or for tunnelling in civil engineering works;
(c) vibrating metal moulding box in the concrete products industry, or circular saw to cut concrete masonry blocks;
(d) machine in the manufacture of textiles for weaving man-made or natural fibres (including mineral fibres), high speed false twisting of fibres, or the mechanical cleaning of bobbins
(e) multi-cutter moulding machine on wood, planing machine on wood, automatic or semiautomatic lathe on wood, multiple cross-cut machine on wood, automatic shaping machine onwood, double-end tenoning machine on wood, vertical spindle moulding machine (including a high speed routing machine) onwood, edge banding machine on wood, bandsawing machine (with a blade width of not less than 75 millimetres) on wood, circular sawing machine on wood including one operated by moving the blade towards the material being cut, or chain saw on wood;
(f) jet of water (or mixture of water and abrasive material) at a pressure above 680 bar, or jet channelling process to burn stone in a quarry;
(g) machine in a ship’s engine room, or gas turbine for performance testing on a test bed, installation testing of a replacement engine in an aircraft, or acceptance testing of an Armed Service fixed wing combat aircraft;
(h) machine in the manufacture of glass containers or hollow ware for automatic moulding, automatic blow moulding, or automatic glass pressing and forming;
(i) spinning machine using compressed air to produce glass wool or mineral wool;
(j) continuous glass toughening furnace;
(k) firearm by a police firearms training officer; or
(l) shot-blaster to carry abrasives in air for cleaning.
A11 a) Intense blanching of the skin, with a sharp demarcation line between affected and non-affected skin, where the blanching is cold-induced, episodic, occurs throughout the year and affects the skin of the distal with the middle and proximal phalanges, or distal with the middle phalanx (or in the case of a thumb the distal with the proximal phalanx), of –
(i) in the case of a person with 5 fingers (including thumb) on one hand, any 3 of those fingers, or

(ii) in the case of a person with only 4 such fingers, any 2 of those fingers, or

(iii) in the case of a person with less than 4 such fingers, any one of them or, as the case may be, the one remaining finger,

where none of the person's fingers was subject to any degree of cold-induced, episodic blanching of the skin prior to the person's employment in an occupation described in the third column in relation to this paragraph, or

(b) significant, demonstrable reduction in both sensory perception and manipulative dexterity with continuous numbness or continuous tingling all present at the same time in the distal phalanx of any finger (including thumb) where none of the person's fingers was subject to any degree of reduction in sensory perception, manipulative dexterity, numbness or tingling prior to the person's employment in an occupation described in the second column in relation to this paragraph,

where the symptoms in paragraph (a) or paragraph (b) were caused by vibration.
(a) the use of hand-held chain saws on wood; or
(b) the use of hand-held rotary tools in grinding or in the sanding or polishing of metal, or the holding of material being ground, or metal being sanded or polished, by rotary tools; or
(c) the use of hand-held percussive metalworking tools, or the holding of metal being worked upon by percussive tools, in riveting, caulking, chipping, hammering, fettling or swaging; or
(d) the use of hand-held powered percussive drills or hand-held powered percussive hammers in mining, quarrying, demolition, or on roads or footpaths, including road construction; or
(e) the holding of material being worked upon by pounding machines in shoe manufacture.
A12 Carpal tunnel syndrome (a) The use, at the time the symptoms first develop, of hand-held powered tools whose internal parts vibrate so as to transmit that vibration to the hand, but excluding those tools which are solely powered by hand; or
(b) repeated palmar flexion and dorsiflexion of the wrist for at least 20 hours per week for a period or periods amounting in aggregate to at least 12 months in the 24 months prior to the onset of symptoms. We use “repeated” to mean once or more often in every thirty seconds.
A13 Osteoarthritis of the hip Work in agriculture as a farmer or farm worker for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 10 years or more.
A14 Osteoarthritis of the knee Work underground in a coal mine for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, at least 10 years in any one or more of the following occupations:
(a) before 1 January 1986 as a coal miner; or
(b) on or after 1 January 1986 as a:
(i) face worker working on a non-mechanised coal face;
(ii) development worker;
(iii) face salvage worker;
(iv) conveyor belt cleaner; or
(v) conveyor belt attendant.
A "non-mechanised coal face" means a coal face without either powered roof supports or a power loader machine which simultaneously cuts and loads the coal or without both.
Work wholly or mainly fitting or laying carpets or floors, (other than concrete floors) for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 20 years or more.
B
Disease Number Name of disease or injury Type of job
Conditions due to biological agents (caused by animal, plant or other living organism) Any job involving
B1(a) Anthrax-cutaneous (a) Contact with anthrax spores, including contact with animals infected by anthrax; or
B1(b) Anthrax-pulmonary (b) handling, loading, unloading or transport of animals of a type susceptible to infection with anthrax or of the products or residues of such animals
B2 Glanders Contact with equine animals or their carcasses. For example, farm and slaughterhouse workers, and grooms handling horses.
B3 Infection by leptospira. For example, swamp fever, swineherd’s disease, and Weil’s disease. (a) Work in places which are, or are liable to be, infested by rats, field mice or voles, or other small mammals; or
(b) work at dog kennels or the care or handling of dogs; or
(c) contact with bovine animals or their meat products or pigs or their meat products. For example, farm, veterinary, sewerage and slaughterhouse workers.
B4(a) Ankylostomiasis-cutaneous larva migrans Contact with a source of ankylostomiasis
B4(b) Ankylostomiasis-iron deficiency anaemia Anaemia caused by hookworm infestation
B5 Tuberculosis. TB infection. Contact with a source of tuberculous infection.
For example, doctors, nurses, ambulance crews, pathology technicians and social workers.
B6 Extrinsic allergic alveolitis. Exposure to moulds or fungal spores or heterologous proteins or another biological substance thay causes extrinsic allergic alveolitis by reason of employment in:
(a) agriculture, horticulture, forestry, cultivation of edible fungi or malt-working; or
(b) loading or unloading or handling in storage mouldy vegetable matter or edible fungi; or
(c) caring for or handling birds; or
(d) handling bagasse; or
(e) work involving exposure to metalworking fluids mists; or
(f) any other workplace.
B7 Infection by organisms of the genus brucella. Brucellosis. Contact with:
(a) animals infected by brucella, or their carcasses or parts thereof, or their untreated products; or
(b) laboratory specimens or vaccines of, or containing, brucella. For example, farm, veterinary, slaughterhouse, animal laboratory workers.
B8A Infection by hepatitis A virus Contact with raw sewage
B8B Infection by hepatitis B or C virus Contact with:
(a) human blood or human blood products; or
(b) any other source of hepatitis B or C virus
B9 Infection by Streptococcus suis. A very rare form of meningitis from exposure to infected pigs or pork products. Contact with pigs infected by Streptococcus suis, or with the carcasses, products or residues of pigs so infected. For example, pork butchers, pig breeders, slaughterhouse workers.
B10(a) Avian chlamydiosis Contact with birds infected with chlamydia psittaci, or with the remains or untreated products of such birds. For example, duck farm workers, feather processing workers, abattoir workers, poultry meat inspectors, pet shop owners and assistants.
B10(b) Ovine chlamydiosis. Contact with sheep infected with chlamydia psittaci, or with the remains or untreated products of such sheep. For example, sheep farm workers, veterinary surgeons.
B11 Q fever. Contact with animals, their remains or their untreated products. For example, farm workers involved in the rearing of sheep, abattoir workers, veterinary surgeons.
B12 Orf. Contact with sheep or goats, or with the carcasses of sheep or goats. For example, farm workers, abattoir workers, meat inspectors.
B13 Hydatidosis. Contact with dogs. For example, shepherds, veterinarians and people who care for dogs.
B14 Lyme disease Exposure to deer or other mammals of a type liable to harbour ticks harbouring Borrelia bacteria
B15 Anaphylaxis Employment as a healthcare worker having contact with products made with natural rubber latex
C
Disease Number Name of disease or injury Type of job
Conditions due to chemical agents (chemical cause) Any job involving
C1(a) Anaemia with a haemoglobin concentration of 9g/dL or less, and a blood film showing punctate basophilia; The use or handling of, and exposure to the fumes, dust or vapour of, lead or a compound of lead, or a substance containing lead.
C1(b) peripheral neuropathy For example, plumbers, painters, enamellers, pottery glazing workers.
C1(c) central nervous system toxicity.
C2 Central nervous system toxicity characterised by parkinsonism. The use or handling of, or exposure to the fumes, dust or vapour of, manganese or a compound of manganese, or a substance containing manganese. For example, dry battery, pottery glazing and soap workers.
C3(a) Phossy Jaw Work involving the use or handling of, or exposure to, white phosphorous.
C3(b) Peripheral polyneuropathy or peripheral polyneuropathy with pyramidal involvement of the central nervous system, caused by organic compounds of phosphorous which inhibit the enzyme neuropathy target esterase. Work involving the use or handling of, or exposure to, organic compounds of phosphorous.
C4 Primary carcinoma of the bronchus or lung. Exposure to the fumes, dust or vapour of arsenic, a compound of arsenic or a substance containing arsenic.
C5(a) Central nervous system toxicity characterised by tremor and neuropsychiatric disease. Exposure to mercury or inorganic compounds of mercury for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 10 years or more.
C5(b) Central nervous system toxicity characterised by combined cerebellar and cortical degeneration. Exposure to methylmercury.
C6 Peripheral neuropathy The use or handling of, or exposure to the fumes or vapour of, carbon disulphide (also called carbon disulfide)
C7 Acute non-lymphatic leukaemia Exposure to benzene
C12(a) Peripheral neuropathy; Exposure to methyl bromide (also called bromomethane).
C12(b) Central nervous system toxicity
C13 Cirrhosis of the liver Exposure to chlorinated naphthalenes
C16(a) Neurotoxicity; Exposure to the dust of gonioma kamassi
C16(b) cardiotoxicity
C17 Chronic beryllium disease Inhalation of beryllium or a beryllium compound
C18 Emphysema Inhalation of cadmium fumes for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 20 years or more.
C19(a) Peripheral neuropathy; Exposure to acrylamide
C19(b) central nervous system toxicity
C20 Dystrophy of the cornea (including ulceration of the corneal surface) of the eye. Wasting and ulceration of the corneal surface of the eye Exposure to quinone or hydroquinone
C21 Primary carcinoma of the skin Exposure to arsenic or arsenic compounds, tar, pitch, bitumen, mineral oil (including paraffin) or soot
C22(a) Primary carcinoma of the mucous membrane of the nose or paranasal sinuses; Work before 1950 in the refining of nickel involving exposure to oxides, sulphides or water-soluble compounds of nickel.
C22(b) primary carcinoma of the bronchus or lung
C23 Primary neoplasm of the epithelial lining of the urinary tract. (a) The manufacture of 1-naphthylamine, 2-naphthylamine, benzidine, auramine, magenta or 4-aminobiphenyl (also called biphenyl-4-ylamine);
(b) work in the process of manufacturing methylene-bisorthochloroaniline (also called
MbOCA) for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 12 months or more;
(c) exposure to 2-naphthylamine, benzidine, 4-aminobiphenyl (also called biphenyl-4-ylamine) or salts of those compounds otherwise than in the manufacture of those compounds;
(d) exposure to orthotoluidine, 4-chloro-2-methylaniline or salts of those compounds; or
(e) exposure for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 5 years or more, to coal tar pitch volatiles produced in aluminium smelting involving the Soderberg process (that is to say, the method of producing aluminium by electrolysis in which the anode consists of a paste of petroleum coke and mineral oil which is baked in situ).
C24 (a) Angiosarcoma of the liver; or
(b) osteolysis of the terminal phalanges of the fingers; or
(c) Sclerodermatous thickening of the skin of the hands; or
(d) Liver fibrosis due to exposure to vinyl chloride monomer
Exposure to vinyl chloride monomer in the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride
C24A Raynaud’s phenomenon due to exposure to vinyl chloride monomer Exposure to vinyl chloride monomer in the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride before 1 January 1984
C25 Vitiligo. The use or handling of, or exposure to, paratertiarybutylphenol(also called 4-tertbutylphenol), paratertiarybutylcatechol (also called 4-tertbutylcatechol), para-amylphenol (also called p-pentyl phenol isomers), hydroquinone, monobenzyl ether of hydroquinone (also called 4-benzyloxyphenol) or mono-butyl ether of hydroquinone (also called 4-butoxyphenol).
C26(a) Liver toxicity; The use or handling of, or exposure to, carbon tetrachloride (also called tetrachloromethane).
C26(b) kidney toxicity.
C27 Liver toxicity. The use or handling of, or exposure to, trichloromethane (also called chloroform).
C29 Peripheral neuropathy The use or handling of, or exposure to, n-hexane or n-butyl methyl ketone
C30(a) Dermatitis; The use or handling of, or exposure to, chromic acid, chromates or dichromates.
C30(b) ulceration of the mucous membrane or the epidermis.
C31 Bronchiolitis obliterans The use or handling of, or exposure to, diacetyl (also called butanedione or 2,3-butanedione) in the manufacture of:
(a) diacetyl; or
(b) food flavouring containing diacetyl; or
(c) food to which flavouring containing diacetyl is added.
C32 Carcinoma of the nasal cavity or associated air sinuses (a) the manufacture of inorganic chromates; or
(b) work in hexavalent chrome plating.
C33 Chloracne Exposure to substances known as chloracnegens
C34 Extrinsic allergic alveolitis Exposure to airborne isocyanates: or to another chemical substance that causes extrinsic alveolitis
D
Disease Number name of disease or injury Type of job
Miscellaneous conditions not included elsewhere in the list Any job involving
D1 Pneumoconiosis. Includes silicosis and asbestosis. (1) (a) The mining, quarrying or working of silica rock or the working of dried quartzose sand or any dry deposit or dry residue of silica or any dry admixture containing such materials (including any occupation in which any of the aforesaid operations are carried out incidentally to the mining or quarrying of other minerals or to the manufacture of articles containing crushed or ground silica rock);
(b) the handling of any of the materials specified in the foregoing subparagraph in or incidental to any of the operations mentioned therein, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from such operations.
(2) The breaking, crushing or grinding of flint or the working or handling of broken, crushed or ground flint or materials containing such flint, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from any such operations.
(3) Sand blasting by means of compressed air with the use of quartzose sand or crushed silica rock or flint, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from sand and blasting.
(4) Work in a foundry or the performance of, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from, any of the following operations:
(a) the freeing of steel castings from adherent siliceous substance;
(b) the freeing of metal castings from adherent siliceous substance:
(i) by blasting with an abrasive propelled by compressed air, by steam or by a wheel, or
(ii) by the use of powerdriven tools.
(5) The manufacture of china or earthenware (including sanitary earthenware, electrical earthenware and earthenware tiles), and any occupation involving substantial exposure to the dust arising therefrom.
(6) The grinding of mineral graphite, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from such grinding.
(7) The dressing of granite or any igneous rock by masons or the crushing of such materials, or substantial exposure to the dust arising from such operations.
(8) The use, or preparation for use, of a grindstone, or substantial exposure to the dust arising therefrom.
(9) (a) The working or handling of asbestos or any admixture of asbestos;
(b) the manufacture or repair of asbestos textiles or other articles containing or composed of asbestos;
(c) the cleaning of any machinery or plant used in any foregoing operations and of any chambers, fixtures and appliances for the collection of asbestos dust;
(d) substantial exposure to the dust arising from any of the foregoing operations.
(10)(a) Work underground in any mine in which one of the objects of the mining operations is the getting of any mineral;
(b) the working or handling above ground at any coal or tin mine of any minerals extracted therefrom, or any operation incidental thereto;
(c) the trimming of coal in any ship, barge, or lighter, or in any dock or harbour or at any wharf or quay;
(d) the sawing, splitting or dressing of slate, or any operation incidental thereto.
(11) The manufacture of carbon electrodes by an industrial undertaking for use in the electrolytic extraction of aluminium from aluminium oxide, and any occupation involving substantial exposure to the dust arising therefrom.
(12) Boiler scaling or substantial exposure to the dust arising therefrom.
(13) Exposure to dust if the person employed in it has never at any time worked in any of the other occupations listed.
D2 Byssinosis. A respiratory condition. Work in any room where any process up to and including the weaving process is performed in a factory in which the spinning or manipulation of raw or waste cotton or of flax, or the weaving of cotton or flax, is carried on. For example, cotton or flax workers.
D3 Diffuse mesothelioma (primary neoplasm of the mesothelium of the pleura or of the pericardium or of the peritoneum). A cancer starting in the covering of the lungs or the lining of the abdomen. Exposure to asbestos, asbestos dust or any admixture of asbestos at a level above that commonly found in the environment at large.
D4 Allergic rhinitis which is due to exposure to any of the following agents: Exposure to any of the agents set out in column 2 of this paragraph. Wide range of occupations for example, metal plating industry, food processing, laboratory workers, grain processing, drug manufacture, washing powder manufacture, hair dressing, electronics industry, welders, dye tea and coffee processing.
(a) isocyanates
(b) platinum salts
(c) fumes of dusts arising from the manufacture, transport or use of hardening agents (including epoxy resin curing agents) based on phthalic anhydride, tetrachlorophthalic anhydride, trimellitic anhydride or triethylenetetramine
(d) fumes arising from the use of rosin as a soldering flux
(e) proteolytic enzymes
(f) animals including insects and other anthropods used for the purposes of research or education or in laboratories
(g) dusts arising from the sowing, cultivation, harvesting, drying, handling, milling, transport or storage of barley, oats, rye, wheat or maize, or the handling,
milling, transport or storage of meal or flour made therefrom  
(h) antibiotics
(i) cimetidine
(j) wood dust
(k) ispaghula
(l) castor bean dust
(m) ipecacuanha
(n) azodicarbonamide
(o) animals including insects and other arthropods or their larval forms used for the purposes of pest control or fruit cultivation, or the larval forms of animals used for the purposes of research, education or in laboratories
(p) glutaraldehyde
(q) persulphate salts or henna
(r) crustaceans or fish or products arising from these in the food processing industry
(s) reactive dyes
(t) soya bean
(u) tea dust
(v) green coffee bean dust
(w) fumes from stainless steel welding. For example, hay fever symptoms.
(x) products made with natural rubber latex
D5 Non-infective dermatitis of external origin (excluding dermatitis due to ionising particles or electromagnetic radiations other than radiant heat). For example, skin rash, dermatitis. Exposure to dust, liquid or vapour or any other external agent except chromic acid, chromates or bi-chromates, capable of irritating the skin (including friction or heat but excluding ionising particles or electromagnetic radiations other than radiant heat). For example, any job involving exposure to a substance which can irritate the skin except for jobs involving exposure to chromium compounds (see C30) and radiation.
D6 Carcinoma of the nasal cavity or associated air sinuses (nasal carcinoma). Cancer of the nose. (a) Attendance for work in or about a building where wooden goods are manufactured or repaired; or
(b) attendance for work in a building used for the manufacture of footwear or components of footwear made wholly or partly of leather or fibreboard; or
(c) attendance for work at a place used wholly or mainly for the repair of footwear made wholly or partly of leather or fibreboard.
D7 Asthma which is due to exposure to any of the following agents: Exposure to any of the agents set out in column 2 of this paragraph.
(a) isocyanates
(b) platinum salts
(c) fumes or dusts arising from the manufacture, transport or use of hardening agents (including epoxy resin curing agents) based on phthalic anhydride, tetrachlorophthalic anhydride, trimellitic anhydride or triethylenetetramine
(d) fumes arising from the use of rosin as a soldering flux
(e) proteolytic enzymes
(f) animals including insects and other arthropods used for the purposes of research or education or in laboratories
(g) dusts arising from the sowing, cultivation, harvesting, drying, handling, milling, transport or storage of barley, oats, rye, wheat or maize, or the handling, milling, transport or storage of meal or flour made therefrom
(h) antibiotics
(i) cimetidine
(j) wood dust
(k) ispaghula
(l) castor bean dust
(m) ipecacuanha
(n) azodicarbonamide
(o) animals including insects and other arthropods or their larval forms, used for the purposes of pest control or fruit cultivation, or the larval forms of animals used for the purposes of research, education or in laboratories
(p) glutaraldehyde  
(q) persulphate salts or henna
(r) crustaceans or fish or products arising from these in the food processing industry
(s) reactive dyes
(t) soya bean
(u) tea dust
(v) green coffee bean dust
(w) fumes from stainless steel welding
(wa) products made with natural rubber latex
(x) any other sensitising agent. (Occupational asthma)
D8 Primary carcinoma of the lung where there is accompanying evidence of asbestosis (a) The working or handling of asbestos or any admixture of asbestos; or
(b) the manufacture or repair of asbestos textiles or other articles containing or composed of asbestos; or
(c) the cleaning of any machinery or plant used in any of the foregoing operations and of any chambers, fixtures and appliances for the collection of asbestos dust; or
(d) substantial exposure to the dust arising from any of the foregoing operations.
D8A Primary carcinoma of the lung Exposure to asbestos, in the course of:
(a) The manufacture of asbestos textiles; or
(b) spraying asbestos; or
(c) asbestos insulation work; or
(d) applying or removing materials containing asbestos in the course of ship building,
where all or any of the exposure occurs before 1 January 1975, for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, five years or more, or otherwise, for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, ten years or more.
D9 Unilateral or bilateral diffuse pleural thickening As D8 above
D10 Primary carcinoma of the lung. (a) Work underground in a tin mine; or
(b) exposure to bis (chloromethyl) ether produced during the manufacture of chloromethyl methyl ether; or
(c) exposure to zinc chromate, calcium chromate or strontium chromate in their pure forms; or
(d) employment wholly or mainly as a coke oven worker:
(i) for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 15 years or more; or
(ii) in top oven work, for a period of, or periods which amount in aggregate to, 5 years or more; or
(iii) in a combination of top oven work and other coke oven work for a total aggregate period of 15 years or more, where one year working in top oven work is treated as equivalent to 3 years in other coke oven work.
D11 Primary carcinoma of the lung where there is accompanying silicosis. Exposure to silica dust in the course of:
(a) the manufacture of glass or pottery
(b) tunnelling in, or quarrying sandstone or granite
(c) mining metal ores
(d) slate quarrying or the manufacturing of artefacts from slate.
(e) mining clay
(f) using siliceous materials as abrasives
(g) cutting stone
(h) stonemasonry
(i) work in a foundry.
D12 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease – COPD where, with maximum effort, where there is evidence of a forced expiratory volume in one second which is:

(i) at least one litre below the appropriate mean value predicted, obtained from the following prediction formulae which give the mean values predicted in litres:

1. For a man, where the measurement is made without back-extrapolation, (3.62 x Height in metres) minus (0.031 x Age in years) minus 1.41; or, where the measurement is made with back-extrapolation, (3.71 x Height in metres) minus (0.032 x Age in years) minus 1.44

2. For a woman, where the measurement is made without back-extrapolation, (3.29 x Height in metres) minus (0.029 x Age in years) minus 1.42; or, where the measurement is made with back-extrapolation, (3.37 x Height in metres) minus (0.030 x Age in years) minus 1.46 or

(ii) less than one litre.
Exposure to coal dust (whether before or after 5th July 1948) by reason of working–
(a) underground in a coal mine for a period or periods amounting in aggregate to at least 20 years;
(b) on the surface of a coal mine as a screen worker for a period or periods amounting in aggregate to at least 40 years before 1st January 1983; or
(c) both underground in a coal mine, and on the surface as a screen worker before 1st January 1983, where 2 years working as a surface screen worker is equivalent to 1 year working underground, amounting in aggregate to at least the equivalent of 20 years underground.
Any such period or periods shall include a period or periods of incapacity while engaged in such an occupation.
D13 Primary carcinoma of the nasopharynx Exposure to wood dust in the course of the processing of wood or the manufacture or repair of wood products, for a period or periods which amount in aggregate to at least 10 years.”.

15. Appendix 2: Prescribed degrees of disablement

Description of injury (Legislation (129)) Degree of disablement
1. Loss of both hands or amputation at higher sites 100
2. Loss of a hand and a foot 100
3. Double amputation through leg or thigh, or amputation through leg or thigh on one side and loss of other foot 100
4. Loss of sight to such an extent as to render the claimant unable to perform any work for which eyesight is essential 100
5. Very severe facial disfiguration 100
6. Absolute deafness 100
7. Forequarter or hindquarter amputation 100
Amputation cases – upper limbs (either arm)  
8. Amputation through shoulder joint 90
9. Amputation below shoulder with stump less than 20.5 centimetres from tip of acromion 80
10. Amputation from 20.5 centimetres from tip of acromion to less than 11.5 centimetres below tip of olecranon 70
11. Loss of a hand or of the thumb and four fingers of one hand or amputation from 11.5 centimetres below tip of olecranon 60
12. Loss of thumb 30
13. Loss of thumb and its metacarpal bone 40
14. Loss of four fingers of one hand 50
15. Loss of three fingers of one hand 30
16. Loss of two fingers of one hand 20
17. Loss of terminal phalanx of thumb 20
Amputation cases – lower limbs  
18. Amputation of both feet resulting in end-bearing stumps 90
19. Amputation through feet proximal to the metatarso-phalangeal joint 80
20. Loss of all toes of both feet through the metatarso-phalangeal joint 40
21. Loss of all toes of both feet proximal to the proximal inter-phalangeal joint 30
22. Loss of all toes of both feet distal to the proximal inter-phalangeal joint 20
23. Amputation at hip 90
24. Amputation below hip with stump not exceeding 13 centimetres in length measured from tip of great trochanter 80
25. Amputation below hip and above knee with stump exceeding 13 centimetres in length measured from tip of great trochanter, or at knee not resulting in end-bearing stump 20
26. Amputation at knee resulting in end-bearing stump or below knee with stump not exceeding 9 centimetres 60
27. Amputation below knee with stump exceeding 9 centimetres but not exceeding 13 centimetres 50
28. Amputation below knee with stump exceeding 13 centimetres 40
29. Amputation of one foot resulting in an end-bearing stump 30
30. Amputation through one foot proximal to the metatarso-phalangeal joint 30
31. Loss of all toes of one foot through the metatarso-phalangeal joint 20
Other injuries  
32. Loss of one eye, without complications, the other being normal 40
33. Loss of vision of one eye, without complications or disfigurement of the eyeball, the other being normal 30
Loss of fingers of the right or left hand  
Index finger  
34. Whole 14
35. Two phalanges 11
36. One phalanx 9
37. Guillotine amputation of tip without loss of bone 5
Middle finger  
38. Whole 12
39. Two phalanges 9
40. One phalanx 7
41. Guillotine amputation of tip without loss of bone 4
Ring or little finger  
42. Whole 7
43. Two phalanges 6
44. One phalanx 5
45. Guillotine amputation of tip without loss of bone 2
Loss of toes of the right or left foot  
Great toe  
46. Through metatarso-phalangeal joint 14
47. Part, with some loss of bone 3
Any other toe  
48. Through metatarso-phalangeal joint 3
49. Part, with some loss of bone 1
Two toes of one foot, excluding great toe  
50. Through metatarso-phalangeal joint 5
51. Part, with some loss of bone 2
Three toes of one foot, excluding great toe  
52. Through metatarso-phalangeal joint 6
53. Part, with some loss of bone 3
Four toes of one foot, excluding great toe  
54. Through metatarso-phalangeal joint 9
55. Part, with some loss of bone 3