Press release

Green light for North Yorkshire coastal path

New coastal paths have been approved from Filey Brigg to Newport Bridge and Dunball Wharf to and St Audries Bay.

Robin Hood's Bay, North Yorkshire
Robin Hood's Bay, North Yorkshire

The longest single section of coastal path ever to be approved has been given the green light by Environment Secretary Elizabeth Truss today, giving walkers access to nearly 70 miles of stunning sea views between Filey Brigg in North Yorkshire and Middlesbrough’s Newport Bridge.

Once works are complete, the new path will stretch around the coast of North-East England along the edge of the North York Moors National Park, passing through Scarborough, Robin Hood’s Bay and Whitby before ending at Middlesbrough’s iconic bridge across the River Tees.

Coastal paths play an important role in attracting visitors to explore rural and coastal communities, meaning more trade for local shops, pubs and hotels which contributes to the UK’s booming £11billion tourism industry.

Commenting on the approval, Rural Affairs Minister Rory Stewart said:

We have already opened miles of coastal paths across the country, enabling thousands of people to enjoy our spectacular coastline. We are an island nation, and the coast and the sea is a central part of what it means to be British.

North Yorkshire features breath-taking scenery, wild, windswept clifftop walks and vast expanses of sandy shore, incredible places for residents and visitors.

The new paths announced today will give people easy access to our outstanding coastline as a place to simply rest, relax and admire the view—something that’s crucial for our health and well-being – but also for some of the most testing, energetic walks in Britain.

Along the new path walkers will be able to enjoy historic sites including the spectacular gothic ruins of Whitby Abbey, a stroll to the end of Yorkshire’s only Victorian pier in Saltburn, and picturesque harbour views in the village of Staithes, home of the explorer Captain Cook.

The Environment Secretary also approved plans to alter the route at Dunball Wharf and St Audries Bay, part of the Somerset coastal path covering the stretch between Brean Down and Minehead, to provide in one place an alternative route so that walkers can avoid the need for a descent from the clifftop to the beach.

The approval of plans for further coastal paths follow the latest milestone in the delivery of one of the world’s longest walkways in December, when Minister Stewart announced the half-way point in government plans to complete a path around the whole of the English coast. Set for completion in 2020, the England Coast Path will stretch across 2700 miles of walking routes, covering 100% of the country.

Notes to Editors:

  1. Work will now begin to prepare this new stretch of coast path in North Yorkshire for public use. The new access rights will commence once the route has been established and works have been completed.

  2. Two variations to the coastal path at Dunball Wharf and St Audries Bay in Somerset have been approved. The new access rights for the 58 mile stretch between Brean Down and Minehead will commence once the route has been established and works have been completed.

  3. For more details on this press release please call Natural England’s press office on 0300 060 1155.

Image: Craig Fast / VisitEngland

Published 15 January 2016