News story

Cumbrian flag flies at Department for Communities and Local Government

This news article was published under the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition government

The Cumbrian flag has been hoisted outside the offices of the Department for Communities and Local Government to celebrate Cumbria Day.

The county of Cumbria was formed in 1974 and it incorporates the old counties of Cumberland and Westmorland, as well as parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire. The area has roots in Roman times, and the name Cumbria is derived from the name the Old Welsh speaking inhabitants gave it: ‘Cymru’ or ‘Cumbri’.

It is predominantly rural and contains the Lake District and Lake District National Park, considered one of England’s most outstanding areas of natural beauty, serving as inspiration for artists, writers, and musicians.

Last year, Mr Pickles relaxed the rules relating to the flying of flags to make it easier for the public to fly a wider range of flags without the need for express consent which could cost up to £335. The changes will increase the number of flags that people can fly, promoting integration and community spirit.

At a ceremony of the hoisting of the Cumbrian flag, Communities Secretary Eric Pickles said:

England’s counties continue to form an important part of our cultural and local identity in this country and many people remain deeply attached to their home county. This sense of pride and shared identity is one of the things that binds communities together.

I’m delighted my department is able to recognise and celebrate Cumbria Day by flying the flag of the county outside its headquarters.

Rory Stewart, MP for Penrith and the Border, said:

It is absolutely wonderful that the Department for Communities and Local Government is raising the county’s flag outside its headquarters to celebrate Cumbria Day here in parliament. In Cumbria Day we have a brilliant opportunity to put Cumbria on the map and showcase the very best of the county to ministers, MPs and the tourism industry.