Foreign travel advice

Uganda

Important COVID-19 travel guidance

The Foreign & Commonwealth Office currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel. Travel to some countries and territories is currently exempted.

This advice is being kept under constant review. Travel disruption is still possible and national control measures may be brought in with little notice, so check our travel guidance.

Health

Coronavirus (COVID-19)

The Ugandan authorities have introduced new measures in relation to coronavirus. If you cannot return to the UK at this time see Staying during coronavirus.

Healthcare

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the latest country-specific health advice from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) on the TravelHealthPro website. Each country-specific page has information on vaccine recommendations, any current health risks or outbreaks, and factsheets with information on staying healthy abroad. Guidance is also available from NHS (Scotland) on the FitForTravel website.

General information on travel vaccinations and a travel health checklist is available on the NHS website. You may then wish to contact your health adviser or pharmacy for advice on other preventive measures and managing any pre-existing medical conditions while you’re abroad.

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or purchased in the UK can be different in other countries. If you’re travelling with prescription or over-the-counter medicine, read this guidance from NaTHNaC on best practice when travelling with medicines. For further information on the legal status of a specific medicine, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

While travel can be enjoyable, it can sometimes be challenging. There are clear links between mental and physical health, so looking after yourself during travel and when abroad is important. Information on travelling with mental health conditions is available in our guidance page. Further information is also available from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC).

On 17 July 2019, the World Health Organisation declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) following an outbreak of the Ebola virus in Eastern DRC. Outbreaks of Ebola were reported in Kasese District in Western Uganda in June and August 2019. There have been no confirmed active cases in Uganda since 30 August 2019 and the outbreak was officially declared over by the Ugandan Ministry of Health on 8 November 2019. The latest updates can be found on World Health Organisation website.

Medical facilities in Uganda are limited especially outside Kampala. Medical help at the scene of an accident is likely to be limited. In the case of serious accident or illness, evacuation by air ambulance may be required. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation.

Malaria and Schistosomiasis (bilharzia) are common in Uganda. There are regular outbreaks of cholera in Uganda. You should follow the health advice issued by the National Travel Health Network and Centre

UK health authorities have classified Uganda as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For information and advice about the risks associated with Zika virus, visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website

Only use boiled or bottled water, and avoid ice in drinks. Don’t eat food prepared by unlicensed vendors or where you have concerns about kitchen hygiene.

Particularly for longer periods of residence in Uganda, it’s good practice to keep spare basic provisions (eg, drinking water and non-perishable foods) at your accommodation, as there can be supply problems from time to time.

In the 2016 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic the UNAIDS/WHO Working Group estimated that around 1,300,000 adults aged 15 or over in Uganda were living with HIV. You should exercise normal precautions to avoid exposure to HIV or AIDS.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 999 and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.