Foreign travel advice

Indonesia

Health

Visit your health professional at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and by NHS (Scotland) on the fitfortravel website. Useful information and advice about healthcare abroad is also available on the NHS Choices website.

The standard of local medical care can be poor and some medical tests can’t be done reliably. Good medical care can be very expensive and in remote areas attention for serious injuries or illness is likely to be unavailable. You may require expensive medical evacuation costing up to tens of thousands of pounds. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and repatriation.

There’s a risk of dengue fever in Bali and elsewhere which is heightened during the rainy season (usually from around October to April).

UK health authorities have classified Indonesia as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For more information and advice visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website for travel to Indonesia - including Bali, for travel to Indonesia - Borneo.

Rabies exists in domestic and wild animals. There are many street dogs in Bali and elsewhere. You should avoid direct contact with all dogs and cats (including pets), monkeys and other animals and seek immediate help if you’re bitten or scratched.

During the dry season (May-November), widespread forest fires can cause smoke haze resulting in poor air quality across parts of Indonesia, particularly Riau Islands, central Sumatra and Kalimantan. The haze can cause disruption to local and regional air travel, and the air pollution may have an impact on public health. Keep up to date with local information and seek medical advice on appropriate precautions. A regional haze map is available from the Singapore Meteorological Service.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 118 and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.

Avian Influenza (bird flu)

Avian flu has led to over 150 confirmed human fatalities in Indonesia since 2003, although the annual rate appears to be declining. All cases so far have been linked to close contact with poultry.

Although the risk to humans from Avian Influenza is low, you should avoid visiting live animal markets, poultry farms and other places where you may come into close contact with domestic, caged or wild birds, and make sure poultry and egg dishes are thoroughly cooked.