Foreign travel advice

India

Health

Visit your health professional at least 4 to 6 weeks before your trip to check whether you need any vaccinations or other preventive measures. Country specific information and advice is published by the National Travel Health Network and Centre on the TravelHealthPro website and by NHS (Scotland) on the fitfortravel website. Useful information and advice about healthcare abroad is also available on the NHS Choices website.

If you’re travelling to India for organ transplant surgery, check in advance with the hospital to find out what proof they require of your circumstances in the UK. You may need to submit evidence of your marriage and birth of your children before the operation can take place. You can get copies of marriage and birth certificates from the General Register Office in the UK. You may wish to consider having them legalised by the FCO Legalisation office before travelling. The British High Commission can’t provide guarantees and certificates on your behalf.

Local medical facilities are not comparable to those in the UK, especially in more remote areas. In major cities private medical care is available, but expensive. A list of the most commonly used hospitals can be found on the British High Commission website.

Severe air pollution is a major hazard to public health in Delhi, and a serious concern in many Indian cities. Children, the elderly and those with pre-existing medical conditions may be especially affected. You can follow further advice at the WHO website

Mosquito-borne diseases like Dengue Fever occur all year round. There’s been an increase in the number of cases of dengue fever, including in New Delhi.

Cases of Chikungunya Virus have been confirmed in India, including in New Delhi. You should take steps to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes.

There has been a reported increase in the number of cases of seasonal flu in 2015 - including H1N1 (swine flu). For information and advice, visit the website of the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) and consult your GP before travel.

For psychiatric illness, specialised treatment may not be available outside major cities.

If you need emergency medical assistance during your trip, dial 102 and ask for an ambulance. You should contact your insurance/medical assistance company promptly if you are referred to a medical facility for treatment.