Health

At least 8 weeks before your trip, check the latest country-specific health advice from the National Travel Health Network and Centre (NaTHNaC) on the TravelHealthPro website. Each country-specific page has information on vaccine recommendations, any current health risks or outbreaks, and factsheets with information on staying healthy abroad. Guidance is also available from NHS (Scotland) on the FitForTravel website.

General information on travel vaccinations and a travel health checklist is available on the NHS website. You may then wish to contact your health adviser or pharmacy for advice on other preventive measures and managing any pre-existing medical conditions while you’re abroad.

The legal status and regulation of some medicines prescribed or purchased in the UK can be different in other countries. If you’re travelling with prescription or over-the-counter medicine, read this guidance from NaTHNaC on best practice when travelling with medicines. For further information on the legal status of a specific medicine, you’ll need to contact the embassy, high commission or consulate of the country or territory you’re travelling to.

Competent medical advice and treatment may not be available outside Rangoon and Mandalay, and any services provided will not be to the standard of those in the UK. Avoid intrusive examinations, including emergency dental work, due to irregular hygiene standards and the danger of infection, particularly by hepatitis B and C and HIV/AIDS.

Cash payment is often required prior to receiving medical treatment in Burma. Make sure you have adequate travel health insurance and accessible funds to cover the cost of any medical treatment abroad and/or repatriation. The UK Government can’t pay for medical expenses overseas.

Cases of cholera have been reported in some areas of Burma. Poor sanitation and eating contaminated food can increase the risk of diarrhoeal illnesses. Drink or use only boiled or bottled water and avoid ice in drinks.

Dengue fever is present in Burma, including in the regions of Rangoon and Mandalay. You should take appropriate precautions to avoid being bitten by mosquitos.

Japanese Encephalitis is present in Burma. The virus is spread by mosquitoes and can be fatal.

There have been outbreaks of Avian Influenza (Bird Flu) in domestic poultry in Burma. While the risk to humans from Avian Influenza is believed to be very low, you should avoid any contact with domestic, caged or wild birds, and ensure poultry and egg dishes are thoroughly cooked.

Cases of Schistosomiasis, a parasitic infection, reported in Burma. There is no vaccine or medication to prevent Schistosomiasis. All travellers should avoid wading, swimming or bathing in freshwater. As the infection may cause no symptoms, all travellers who may have been exposed to Schistosomiasis should have a medical assessment.