Compensation for victims of modern slavery and human trafficking

Modern slavery and human trafficking involve being forced to do something you do not want to do, usually through being hurt or threatened.

It can include being forced to work, get married or move into or around a country against your will.

Modern slavery and human trafficking are crimes. Contact the police if you or someone you know is in immediate danger or a victim of human trafficking or modern slavery.

You can get free help and advice from:

Claim compensation for injuries

You could claim compensation through a court claim or through the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority.

Talk to a legal adviser about your options - you can get legal aid to cover costs.

Make a court claim

You can ask your legal adviser to help you make a ‘civil claim’ through the court for the injuries you’ve suffered (including psychological pain and suffering). You’ll usually need to claim within 3 years.

You can claim yourself without a legal adviser by filling in claim form N1.

Apply to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority

You can apply to the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority if you’ve been the victim of a violent crime or if a friend or family member died as a result of the crime.

You’ll need to report the crime to the police and get a Crime Reference Number before you apply.

You have to claim within 2 years of the incident.

You can make the application yourself without a legal adviser.

Claim compensation because of unfair working conditions

You can claim compensation if you were forced to work for free or for less than the National Minimum Wage. You’ll usually have to make your claim within 3 months of stopping work or the incident happening.

You can also claim compensation if your employer didn’t give you rest breaks, made illegal deductions from your pay or discriminated against you.

Talk to a legal adviser about how to claim - you can get legal aid to help pay for any costs.

You’ll need to:

  1. Tell Acas that you’re planning on making a claim and get a ‘conciliation certificate’ from them.

  2. Make a claim online or by post.