Hazard perception test

Before you start the hazard perception test, you’ll be shown a video about how it works.

You’ll then watch 14 video clips. The clips:

  • feature everyday road scenes
  • contain at least one ‘developing hazard’ - but one of the clips features 2 developing hazards

You get points for spotting the developing hazards as soon as they start to happen.

What a ‘developing hazard’ is

A developing hazard is something that would cause you to take action, like changing speed or direction.

Example A car is parked at the side of the road and isn’t doing anything. It wouldn’t cause you to take action, so it’s not a developing hazard.

When you get closer, the car’s right-hand indicator starts to flash and it starts to move away. You’d need to slow down, so it’s now a developing hazard.

How the scoring works

You can score up to 5 points for each developing hazard.

To get a high score, click the mouse as soon as you see the hazard starting to develop.

You don’t lose points if you click and get it wrong. However, you won’t score anything if you click continuously or in a pattern.

You only get one attempt at each clip. You can’t review or change your responses.

  1. Step 1 Check you're allowed to drive

    Most people can start learning to drive when they’re 17.

    1. Check what age you can drive
    2. Requirements for driving legally
    3. Driving eyesight rules
  2. Step 2 Get a provisional licence

  3. Step 3 Driving lessons and practice

  4. and Prepare for your theory test

  5. Step 4 Book and manage your theory test

  6. Step 5 Book and manage your driving test

  7. Step 6 When you pass

    You can start driving as soon as you pass your driving test.

    You must have an insurance policy that allows you to drive without supervision.

    1. Find out about Pass Plus training courses