Guidance

Teschen disease: how to spot and report it

How to spot Teschen disease, what to do if you suspect it and measures to prevent it.

Teschen disease affects pigs.

It doesn’t affect humans.

There have been no outbreaks of Teschen disease in western Europe since 1980. A less severe form of the disease called Talfan has occurred in Great Britain.

Teschen disease is a notifiable disease. That means if you suspect it you must tell the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) immediately. Failure to do so is an offence.

How to spot Teschen disease

The disease can affect pigs of all ages.

The early clinical signs are:

  • fever
  • loss of appetite
  • lack of energy
  • lack of co-ordination

Affected pigs may also:

  • grind their teeth
  • suffer convulsions
  • lose their voice
  • smack their lips
  • suffer paralysis

The disease affects pigs suddenly. Many lose the ability to move and may die within 3 or 4 days. It is often fatal, though mildly affected animals may survive.

How Teschen disease is spread

Teschen disease is spread by:

  • contact with infected pigs or their faeces
  • contact with anything that’s contaminated, eg equipment, vehicles or people

Preventing and controlling Teschen disease

You can help to prevent Teschen disease by practising strict biosecurity on your premises.

If you report suspicion of Teschen disease, APHA vets will investigate.

If Teschen disease is confirmed, the outbreak will be controlled in line with the contingency plan for exotic notifiable diseases.

Further information on prevention and control

Controls to prevent disease

What happens when a notifiable disease is suspected or confirmed

Legislation relating to Teschen disease

The main domestic legislation on Teschen disease is the Teschen Disease Order 1974.

Further information on prevention and control

Controls to prevent disease

What happens when a notifiable disease is suspected

What happens when a notifiable disease is confirmed

Published 26 August 2014
Last updated 1 October 2014 + show all updates
  1. AHVLA documents have been re-assigned to the new Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA).
  2. First published.