Guidance

Community right to bid: appeal against a listing decision

How to appeal to a tribunal against a council decision to keep your property on its list of local community assets.

What you can appeal against

The council may list your property as a community asset to give local groups the chance to bid for it if you decide to sell.

To disagree with the listing, first write to the council and ask for a review. You have to do this within 8 weeks of receiving the notice about the list.

If the council decides to keep your land or building on the list after the review, you can appeal to the tribunal.

The tribunal

Your case will be dealt with by a tribunal in the General Regulatory Chamber.

The tribunal is independent of the government, and will listen to both sides of the argument before reaching a decision.

Time limits for appealing

You have 28 days to appeal after the council sends you its decision on the review.

If you miss the time limit, you can ask for more time to appeal. Explain why you’re late, and the tribunal will decide if it can still take your case.

How to appeal

Use the notice of appeal form and guidance leaflet.

Include any supporting documents, such as the council’s review decision.

Clearly say why you think the council’s decision was wrong.

Send the form to grc@justice.gov.uk or:

General Regulatory Chamber
HM Courts & Tribunals Service
PO Box 9300
Leicester
LE1 8DJ

Telephone: 0300 123 4504

Tribunal staff can explain how the process works, but they can’t give you legal advice.

What happens next

The tribunal will write to you about the next steps.

Find out more about General Regulatory Chamber hearings and decisions.

Previous decisions

You can find copies of decisions on previous cases on the BAILII website.

Legislation and rules

You have find the right to appeal against a listing decision under the Localism Act 2011 and the Assets of Community Value (England) Regulations 2012.

Read more detailed rules on how your appeal will be handled in the General Regulatory Chamber procedure rules.

Published 18 November 2014