Official Statistics

Oral health survey of 5-year-old children 2017

Results of the National Dental Epidemiology Programme for England’s biennial survey, which took place in the academic year 2016 to 2017.

Documents

Oral health survey of 5-year-old children: 2017

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Results of 5-year-old oral health survey 2017

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Details

The results of the oral health survey of 5-year-old children 2017 show:

  • wide variation at both regional and local authority level for both prevalence and severity of dental decay
  • overall 76.7% of 5-year-old children in England had no experience of obvious dental decay
  • this is the fourth consecutive survey which has shown improvement in the proportion of children free from obvious dental decay

The oral health survey of 5-year-old children takes place every two years to collect dental health information for children aged 5 years old who attend mainstream, state-funded schools across England. It is carried out as part of the PHE National Dental Epidemiology Programme for England.

The aim of the survey is to measure the prevalence and severity of dental caries among 5-year-old children within each lower-tier local authority. This is to provide information to local authorities, the NHS and other partners on the dental health of children in their local areas and highlight any inequalities.

Published 15 May 2018