Guidance

Radiation doses to the public from nuclear installations: guidance

This report (HPA-RPD-019) gives guidance on all aspects of dose assessment to reference groups from the routine operations of nuclear sites.

Document

HPA-RPD-019: guidance on the assessment of radiation doses to members of the public due to the operation of nuclear installations under normal conditions

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Detail

The assessment of radiation doses to individuals in the population is an important part of the system of radiation protection. A significant concept in such assessments is the identification of groups in the population likely to receive the highest doses; so-called reference or critical groups. Member States of the European Union (EU) use different approaches both to identify reference groups and to calculate their doses. The European Commission, therefore, identified the need for a common methodology to assist in harmonisation of the approach for calculating such doses and to the application of standards throughout the EU.

This report gives guidance on all aspects of the assessment of doses to reference groups from the routine operations of nuclear installations. The work was developed in consultation with a working party on realistic assessment of the impact of nuclear installations on members of the public (RAIN) of the standing group of experts under Article 31 of the Euratom directive. This work was the main basis of the European Commission document, RP129, Guidance on the realistic assessment of radiation doses to members of the public due to the operation of nuclear installations under normal conditions.

This report was originally made available on the website of the European Commission Radiation Protection Unit in 2002. The work therein was undertaken by the then National Radiological Protection Board. Copyright is held by the European Commission.