Guidance

National Cancer Patient Experience Survey Programme - 2010: national survey report

This national report provides insights into the care experienced by cancer patients across England who were treated as day cases or inpatients during the first three months of 2010.

Documents

National Cancer Patient Experience Survey Programme - 2010 survey report

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One to one support for cancer patients - a report prepared for DH by Frontier Economics Ltd

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Detail

The 2010 survey builds on a previous survey undertaken in 2000 involving over 65,000 cancer patients and a smaller survey undertaken in 2004 involving 4,300 patients. Importantly the 2010 survey is the first to involve patients with all types of cancer. It is also the first national survey in this country in which the word cancer has been explicitly used.

Each of the 158 NHS Trusts taking part in the survey have been provided with a bespoke report which enables them to compare their provision of cancer patient experience with other Trusts, and to drive quality improvements and better outcomes locally. 

The 2010 Cancer Patient Experience Survey demonstrates a compelling link between access to one to one support through a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) and improved patient experience. The Department of Health commissioned Frontier Economics to provide an independent analysis of the cost effectiveness of one to one support roles provided by CNS and other staff for cancer patients.

The report shows that in many scenarios, the costs of additional one to one support roles are likely to be outweighed by the potential savings that can be achieved through improved coordination of care.

To support this work the Centre for Workforce Intelligence has provided advice on workforce issues and risks that should be considered when looking to implement one to one support. The Centre for Workforce Intelligence will be publishing this advice on their website.