Research and analysis

Migrant Journey: research report 57

.Home Office Research Report 57 presents findings from further analysis of the cohort of migrants reported in The Migrant Journey.

Documents

Migrant Journey: Second Report summary (PDF file - 485kb)

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Migrant Journey: Second Report (PDF file - 2mb - Warning: large file)

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Migrant Journey: Second Report data tables (Microsoft Excel file - 518kb)

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Detail

Home Office Research Report 57 presents findings from further analysis of the cohort of migrants reported in ‘The Migrant Journey’ (Achato, Eaton & Jones, 2010). UK Border Agency records of migrants granted non visitor visas in 2004 and settlement in 2009 were analysed to identify the most common nationalities seeking entry and settlement, their immigration statuses after five years and their pathways to settlement.

Results showed that for the family, work (leading to settlement) and study route cohorts, the countries studied had notably different outcomes in terms of the proportion with valid leave to remain or granted settlement after five years.

Migrants from the top countries for settlement in 2009 used a variety of routes to enter the UK, however settlement was most commonly achieved via the family route and work (leading to settlement) route without switching categories. A case file analysis of a sample migrants granted spousal visas in 2009 found that most were married to British Citizens and applied to come to the UK less than a year after marriage.