Research and analysis

Improving teaching standards through listening to learners

Four Ofsted good practice examples of providers who involve, listen carefully to and work effectively with their learners to improve teaching, learning and assessment.

Documents

Chichester College: good practice example

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Chichester College: good practice example

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HMP Wymott: good practice example

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HMP Wymott: good practice example

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New College Pontefract: good practice example

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New College Pontefract: good practice example

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Nova Training: good practice example

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Nova Training: good practice example

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Details

This is a selection of four case studies of providers who involve, listen carefully to and work effectively with their learners to improve teaching, learning and assessment. The case studies cover providers in 4 areas of the further education and skills sector: a general further education college, an independent learning provider, a prison and a sixth form college.

The Ofsted survey report, Teaching, learning and assessment in further education and skills – what works and why, September 2014, recommends that for providers to improve their teaching, learning and assessment, leaders should ‘draw fully on learners’ views about the teaching, learning and assessment that they receive to inform self-assessment and improvement actions’.

Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector’s Annual Report for further education and skills in 2012/13 identified that ‘where procedures were ineffective at improving teaching, the systems for monitoring the quality of teaching frequently failed to identify where and why teaching was not effectively supporting all the learners… all too often, these weaker providers either failed to listen to their learners or took too much notice of positive satisfaction surveys without checking whether their questions were analytical enough’.

Inspectors found 4 providers’ use of learners’ views to be instrumental in ensuring that the standard of teaching, learning and assessment was of outstanding or good quality. The term ‘learner’ refers to all people enrolled on publicly-funded learning and skills provision, including apprentices, prisoners and adults on workplace learning.