Research and analysis

Hospital tooth extractions of 0 to 19 year olds

Episodes of children being admitted to hospital for tooth extractions from 2011 to 2018.

Documents

Hospital tooth extractions 0 to 19 year olds 2011 to 2018

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Hospital tooth extractions 0 to 19 year olds 2011 to 2018

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology. Request an accessible format.

If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email publications@phe.gov.uk. Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use.

Details

This spreadsheet provides data from the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) dataset starting from 2011 to 2018. This includes inpatient care figures from National Health Service (NHS) hospitals across England.

The latest data from the financial year 2017 to 2018 shows:

  • 7% (59,314) of hospital episodes of 0 to 19 year olds involved dental extractions
  • Dental extraction is the most common reason for 6 to 10 year olds to be admitted to hospital
  • 65% of these extractions are recorded as being required because of decay

Dental decay has reduced in recent years but is still a problem that causes pain, infection, lack of sleep and time off work or school. It also costs a lot to treat in general dental practices and hospitals. Some communities are far more affected than others.

Children have extractions carried out in hospital mainly because they need general anaesthetic for the procedure. They may be very young or uncooperative, have multiple teeth requiring extraction or have very broken down teeth or infection.

Please note:

  • The data is organised by local authority of child’s residence and grouped by region.
  • From 2014 to 2015 onwards, episodes are split by primary diagnosis of caries or non-caries.
  • Detailed information on methods and definitions are in the introduction and indicator alignment worksheets.
Published 6 March 2019