Guidance

Dementia in older age: barriers to primary prevention and factors

Evidence review showing that changing some behaviours in midlife can reduce the chances of getting dementia in older age.

Documents

Primary prevention of dementia: barriers and facilitators

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The effect of midlife risk factors on dementia in older age

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The effect of mid-life risk factors on dementia in older age: key messages

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Why no reliable estimate can be produced for the rate of return on investment in primary prevention of dementia

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Details

These documents help commissioners and researchers make decisions about prioritisation of primary prevention measures relevant to dementia.

This review, by the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the London School of Economics and Political Science (2016), shows that there is evidence that the risk of dementia is increased by:

  • physical inactivity
  • current smoking
  • diabetes
  • hypertension in mid-life
  • obesity in mid-life and depression

It also shows that mental activity can reduce the risk of dementia.

To promote primary prevention of dementia, it is important to understand both the barriers to primary prevention and factors which facilitate primary prevention.

Published 28 July 2017