Research and analysis

COVID-19 mental health and wellbeing surveillance: report

This is a routinely updated report about population mental health and wellbeing in England during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Applies to England

Documents

Details

This report is about population mental health and wellbeing in England during the COVID-19 pandemic. It includes up-to-date information to inform policy, planning and commissioning in health and social care. It is designed to assist stakeholders at national and local level, in both government and non-government sectors.

The report is regularly updated with the most recent information available.

After taking feedback from stakeholders in May and June 2021, the format and frequency of the report has been revised. It will now be updated quarterly, and the report now concentrates on:

  • important findings

  • measures of anxiety, loneliness, depression and life satisfaction

  • children and young people

The Spotlight section has been retained. It includes a series of reports describing different aspects of inequality. New reports will be added regularly. The previously published Spotlights remain available.

Some data on mental health and wellbeing during the pandemic is updated more often than quarterly. The latest available data can be found in the Wider Impacts of COVID-19 on Health (WICH) tool. Information which was in the discontinued chapters can also be viewed there.

The previous version of this report was archived.

We would like to express our thanks to our various partners, without whom this work would not have been possible.

Published 8 September 2020
Last updated 29 July 2021 + show all updates
  1. Revised format following user survey. Updated data to 14 June 2021.

  2. Added link to survey.

  3. Updated to include data up to week 7, 2021 (15 February) and new link added to 'Spotlights: variation within the population'.

  4. Updated to include latest data. New Spotlight also added on employment and income.

  5. Updated data to week 46 and new pre-existing mental health conditions spotlight.

  6. All relevant chapters updated. Academic studies included up to 4 September 2020; weekly data may be more recent.

  7. First published.