Guidance

Botulism: infection in people who inject drugs

Advice for people who inject drugs (PWID) on reducing the risk of wound botulism.

Documents

Alert poster: botulism in people who inject drugs

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Information for those giving advice on botulism in people who inject drugs

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Details

Wound botulism is a rare and very serious bacterial infection that is acquired when spores of the botulism bacterium get into the body. The spores can be found in soil but may also be present in contaminated supplies of street drugs such as heroin.

Drug users may become infected through injecting the contaminated drugs into the skin and muscles. This document provides advice on how to reduce the risk of infection.

Published 16 September 2013