Press release

Common sense rules protect British pubs from the crippling cost of keeping the peace

This news article was published under the 2010 to 2015 Conservative and Liberal Democrat coalition government

The government is intervening to protect landlords and music promoters from crippling costs associated with soundproofing their venues.

British bands from the Beatles to the Stones and the Clash to the Smiths all started out playing gigs in Great British pubs. But in recent times pubs and live music venues have come under threat of closure over noise complaints.

The government is intervening to protect landlords and music promoters from crippling costs associated with soundproofing their historic venues.

Community Pubs Minister Kris Hopkins wants councils to call time on a practice where pubs are penalised when new homes are built nearby. He has issued common sense guidance for councils telling them they must defend established music venues and pubs from having to bear the costs of keeping the peace with new neighbours.

The guide puts developers building new homes near live music venues or pubs in the frame to include sound-proofing in the homes. This will protect landlords from having to shell out thousands of pounds in sound-proofing to prevent battles over noise.

Community Pubs Minister Kris Hopkins said:

It is absolutely right that we protect the link between the Great British Pub and our national culture of live musical entertainment.

This country has given the world the sounds of the Beatles and the Stones, who started their careers playing shows in the backrooms and basements of our pubs. Thanks to this common sense guidance council killjoys will not be calling time on this great British tradition.

He added:

Councils should be able to take action against the small minority of irresponsible licensed premises who cause nuisance for nearby neighbours, as well as being able to vet and control applications to extend licensing hours or open new licensed premises.

But well-run, long-standing pubs and clubs shouldn’t be penalised for continued to run their venue like they always have, in a responsible way.

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