Press release

Act FAST adverts return to air to highlight symptoms of stroke

TV adverts are returning to further promote stroke awareness.

An image from the ACT FAST campaign

The ads describe what happens when someone is having a stroke and encourages people to call 999 as soon as they notice any of the symptoms in others or experience symptoms themselves.

The return of the adverts on 19 October is part of the national Act FAST campaign.

The adverts show people having a stroke in everyday circumstances.

In one a woman has a stroke while applying her make-up and in another a man suffers one while at the barbers.

Further activity with the Stroke Association, as part of the Act FAST campaign, will be unveiled to coincide with World Stroke Day on 29 October.

Public Health England is once again urging people to ‘Act FAST’ at the first sign of a stroke by highlighting the common symptoms to be aware of:

  • Face - has their face fallen on one side? Can they smile?
  • Arms - can they raise both their arms and keep them there?
  • Speech - is their speech slurred?

If they notice any of these symptoms it is:

  • Time - time to call 999 if you see any single one of these signs.

Background

The Act FAST campaign will run nationally from 19 October to 15 November. The campaign will consist of TV and video on demand advertising supported by digital search. A separate strand of activity including TV, radio and press advertising will specifically target South Asian, Black Caribbean and Black African BME audiences

On World Stroke Day on 29 October, video content, an infographic, case studies, and campaign spokespeople will be available.

The Act FAST campaign:

  • Face - has their face fallen on one side? Can they smile?
  • Arms - can they raise both their arms and keep them there?
  • Speech - is their speech slurred?
  • Time - time to call 999 if you see any single one of these signs

Additional symptoms of stroke and mini stroke include:

  • sudden loss of vision or blurred vision in one or both eyes
  • sudden weakness or numbness on one side of the body
  • sudden memory loss or confusion
  • sudden dizziness, unsteadiness or a sudden fall, especially with any of the other symptoms

A mini stroke is also known as a transient ischaemic attack (TIA). It is caused by a temporary disruption in the blood supply to part of the brain. A mini stroke has similar symptoms to a full stroke, except that these symptoms last for a much shorter amount of time. Without immediate treatment, around one in five of those who experience a mini stroke will go on to have a full stroke within a few days.

Public Health England exists to protect and improve the nation’s health and wellbeing, and reduce health inequalities. It does this through world-class science, knowledge and intelligence, advocacy, partnerships and the delivery of specialist public health services. PHE is an operationally autonomous executive agency of the Department of Health. Website: www.gov.uk/phe. Twitter: @PHE_uk, Facebook: www.facebook.com/PublicHealthEngland.

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Published 19 October 2015