Local laws and customs

You should respect local traditions, customs, laws and religions at all times and be aware of your actions to ensure that they do not offend other cultures or religious beliefs, especially if you intend to visit religious areas.

Carry a form of photo identification with you at all times, including colour copies to hand over to immigration or traffic police if required.

There are severe penalties for drug trafficking in South Sudan.

All photography including on a camera phone requires a formal permit from the Ministry of Information. Don’t take photographs close to government buildings, military installations, public utilities (including petrol stations), and other sensitive areas (bridges, airports). Many plain clothes public security officers operate across South Sudan. Two foreign nationals were followed, harassed and arrested by the authorities in Juba after photographing a petrol station.

A number of British nationals have been arrested over commercial disputes, even where the individual has no direct link to the ongoing dispute. Some others have been approached with fraudulent commercial scams. There have been credible reports of increased harassment, temporary detention and expulsion of foreign nationals including NGO staff and journalists entering and leaving Juba airport by South Sudan security services linked to visa and work permit issues. You should exercise caution at all times.

Society is socially conservative. Homosexuality and extra marital relations are not culturally accepted.