Foreign travel advice

Jamaica

Important COVID-19 travel guidance

The Foreign & Commonwealth Office currently advises British nationals against all but essential international travel. Travel to some countries and territories is currently exempted.

This advice is being kept under constant review. Travel disruption is still possible and national control measures may be brought in with little notice, so check our travel guidance.

Summary

From 4 July, Jamaica is exempt from the FCO advice against all non-essential international travel. This is based on the current assessment of COVID-19 risks.

Travel is subject to entry restrictions

  • Prior to checking in for a flight to Jamaica, you must get authorisation to enter from the Visit Jamaica website
  • All travellers arriving in Jamaica will be tested for Covid-19 and screened for symptoms at the airport

See Entry requirements for more information before you plan to travel.

Check our advice on foreign travel during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and sign up for email alerts for this travel advice.

If you’re planning travel to Jamaica, find out what you need to know about coronavirus there in the Coronavirus section.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to get travel insurance and check it provides sufficient cover. See the FCO’s guidance on foreign travel insurance.

Over 216,000 British nationals visited Jamaica in 2018. Most visits are trouble-free.

There are high levels of crime and violence, particularly in the capital Kingston. See Crime

There are currently States of Emergency (SOEs) and Zones of Special Operations (ZOSOs) in place in a number of areas. These measures allow the military to support the police in joint security operations in response to recent violence and shooting incidents. See Security operations

The hurricane season in Jamaica normally runs from June to November. See Natural disasters

Public order incidents and demonstrations can occur across Jamaica, and may cause significant disruption to traffic and public transportation. You should avoid all demonstrations; they have the potential to turn violent and are often used by criminals as cover for robbery and theft. See Demonstrations

UK health authorities have classified Jamaica as having a risk of Zika virus transmission. For more information and advice, visit the National Travel Health Network and Centre website.

Although there’s no recent history of terrorism in Jamaica, attacks can’t be ruled out. See Terrorism

You can contact the emergency services by calling 119 for police, ambulance and fire.

If you’re abroad and you need emergency help from the UK government, contact the nearest British embassy, consulate or high commission.

The Overseas Business Risk service offers information and advice for British companies operating overseas on how to manage political, economic, and business security-related risks.