3. Eligibility

You could get a payment if you’re severely disabled and your disability was caused by vaccination against any of the following diseases:

  • diphtheria
  • tetanus
  • pertussis (whooping cough)
  • poliomyelitis
  • measles
  • mumps
  • rubella (German measles)
  • tuberculosis (TB)
  • haemophilus influenzae type B (HIB)
  • meningococcal group C (meningitis C)
  • pneumococcal infection
  • human papillomavirus
  • pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 (swine flu) - up to 31 August 2010
  • smallpox - up to 1 August 1971

You may have had a combined vaccination against a number of the diseases listed. For example, you might have been vaccinated against DTP (diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis) or MMR (measles, mumps and rubella).

You may also be able to get a payment if you’re severely disabled because either:

  • your mother was vaccinated against one of the diseases in the list while she was pregnant
  • you’ve been in close physical contact with someone who’s had an oral vaccine against poliomyelitis

What counts as ‘severely disabled’

Disablement is worked out as a percentage, and ‘severe disablement’ means at least 60% disabled.

This could be a mental or physical disablement and will be based on medical evidence from the doctors or hospitals involved in your treatment.

When and where the vaccination must have taken place

You must normally have been vaccinated before your 18th birthday unless the vaccination was during an outbreak of disease in the UK or the Isle of Man, or it was against:

  • poliomyelitis
  • rubella
  • Meningococcal Group C
  • human papillomavirus
  • pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 (swine flu)

The vaccination must have been given in the UK or the Isle of Man, unless you were vaccinated as part of Armed Forces medical treatment.

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